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Posts Tagged ‘Veteran’

Poetry night in Hanoi for American War veteran

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 9:52 am

American War veteran and poet, Professor Bruce Weigl is in Vietnam for the launch of his Memoir ‘After the Rain Stopped Pounding’ and for literary exchanges during his visit from December 10 to 20.

The memoir “After the Rain Stopped Pounding”

His memoir ‘After the Rain Stopped Pounding’ includes 36 of his poems and 6 articles which have been translated into Vietnamese by Nguyen Phan Que Mai.


As a translator, Nguyen Phan Que Mai was moved to tears as he visualized images of a now 60 year old man who only felt regret and sorrow at the horrible atrocities that his government and the armed forces committed during the Vietnam War.


Literary experts see the poetical world of Bruce Weigl as brimming with love, remorse and sensitivity.

Vietnamese poet Tran Dang Khoa thinks his poems help to relive the heroic and dolorous moments during the war with America and deeply sympathizes with American soldiers who were thrown in the cruel war in the line of duty.

 

American War veteran and poet, Professor Bruce Weigl

Bruce Weigl was born in 1949 in Lorain, Ohio. He served in the Vietnam War from 1967 to 1968. His first full-length collection of poems A Romance, was published in 1979.


Weigl once served as the president of the Associated Writing Programs. He was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 1988 for Song of Napalm and in 2006 he won the Lannan Literary Award in Poetry. He was awarded the 2003 Poetry Panel Chair for the National Book Award.


The poetry night ‘Returning to my Vietnamese home’ and the launch of his memoir will take place in Hanoi on December 16.

Source: SGGP

Pakistani woman, Vietnamese war veteran

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 2:33 pm

Ngo Thi Bi Bi, an 80-year-old Pakistani citizen, made great contributions to Vietnam during its resistance wars against France and the US, thus, the president of Vietnam allowed her to change her citizenship to Vietnamese.

Le Ba Can, Secretary of the District 1 Party Committee, Ho Chi Minh City, presents flowers to Ms Ngo Thi Bi Bi at a congress of the district’s Fatherland Front Committee.

She became an invalid in the anti-French resistance war and then continued to serve during the revolution against the US.
 
She was born Mahamas Bi Bi. Her mother was from Hanoi and her father was a Pakistani merchant who traded in Saigon and Hanoi during the period leading up to the August Revolution of 1945.
 
The daughter of two bloodlines became a revolutionary solider in the anti-French resistance war under sensational circumstances.
 
It was unfortunate when her mother passed away, as she had just turned ten years old.
 
French colonists came back to occupy Saigon and Hanoi from 1945-1946, causing much difficulty for Mr. Mahamas’ business, so he went to Phnom Penh, Cambodia, bringing his daughter along.
 
In the country of temples, he missed his wife and searched for a Vietnamese tutor to bring up Bi Bi, who he loved very much.
 
Ngo Thi Nam, who had just arrived in Cambodia from Vietnam, agreed to work for him and be his daughter’s tutor.
 
Nam was a revolutionary soldier from the Mekong Delta province of Cuu Long, Vietnam, who came to Cambodia to seek shelter because French detectives had sought her.
 
French detectives followed her to Cambodia so she had to return to Chau Doc District in the Mekong Delta An Giang Province.
 
Nam did not have the heart to leave Bi Bi alone in Cambodia, with her father going off to trade in another province, so the tutor brought Bi Bi with her back to Vietnam.
 
At that time, Bi Bi was only 13 years old, apart from her father and live with the tutor, an adoptive mother, and she followed Viet Minh (Vietnam Independence League) from that day.
 
She followed her adoptive mother in conducting revolutionary activities in the vicinity of Gia Dinh.
 
Unluckiness came to her again when her adoptive mother passed away due to a serious illness.
 
Thenceforth, she was reared in a liberated area in Hoc Mon-Ba Diem-Phuc Hoa by many adoptive mothers and sister figures, who were revolutionary soldiers, before reuniting with her father in Saigon
 
She became a messenger of the 15th Platoon and then of the 308th Regiment commanded by Huynh Van Mot when she turned 16 years old.
 
She helped many officers to travel secretly in and out of inner Saigon, and supplied chemicals, foods, clothes and many other goods to revolutionaries.
 
She also gave medicine and information to officers arrested at the Catinat police station.
 
While running errands for the 308th Regiment on Ong Co paddy field, now in Binh Thanh District, in 1948-1949, she was severely injured when enemy airplanes detected revolutionary soldiers, dropping bombs and firing down shots.
 
In the anti-American war, her health was not good but she made her house a place for officers to stay and organize meetings. She also adopted many children of war martyrs.
 
Now she lives alone in Ben Thanh Ward, Ho Chi Minh City’s District 1, and has enjoyed benefits from preferential polices for war invalids since the country’s reunification in 1975.

Source: SGGP

Pakistani woman, Vietnamese war veteran

In Uncategorized on July 29, 2010 at 3:17 pm




Pakistani woman, Vietnamese war veteran


QĐND – Thursday, July 29, 2010, 20:39 (GMT+7)


Ngo Thi Bi Bi, an 80-year-old Pakistani citizen, made great contributions to Vietnam during its resistance wars against France and the US, thus, the president of Vietnam allowed her to change her citizenship to Vietnamese.

She became an invalid in the anti-French resistance war and then continued to serve during the revolution against the US.


She was born Mahamas Bi Bi. Her mother was from Hanoi and her father was a Pakistani merchant who traded in Saigon and Hanoi during the period leading up to the August Revolution of 1945.


The daughter of two bloodlines became a revolutionary solider in the anti-French resistance war under sensational circumstances.


It was unfortunate when her mother passed away, as she had just turned ten years old.


French colonists came back to occupy Saigon and Hanoi from 1945-1946, causing much difficulty for Mr. Mahamas’ business, so he went to Phnom Penh, Cambodia, bringing his daughter along.


In the country of temples, he missed his wife and searched for a Vietnamese tutor to bring up Bi Bi, who he loved very much.


Ngo Thi Nam, who had just arrived in Cambodia from Vietnam, agreed to work for him and be his daughter’s tutor.


Nam was a revolutionary soldier from the Mekong Delta province of Cuu Long, Vietnam, who came to Cambodia to seek shelter because French detectives had sought her.


French detectives followed her to Cambodia so she had to return to Chau Doc District in the Mekong Delta An Giang Province.


Nam did not have the heart to leave Bi Bi alone in Cambodia, with her father going off to trade in another province, so the tutor brought Bi Bi with her back to Vietnam.


At that time, Bi Bi was only 13 years old, apart from her father and live with the tutor, an adoptive mother, and she followed Viet Minh (Vietnam Independence League) from that day.


She followed her adoptive mother in conducting revolutionary activities in the vicinity of Gia Dinh.


Unluckiness came to her again when her adoptive mother passed away due to a serious illness.


Thenceforth, she was reared in a liberated area in Hoc Mon-Ba Diem-Phuc Hoa by many adoptive mothers and sister figures, who were revolutionary soldiers, before reuniting with her father in Saigon.


She became a messenger of the 15th Platoon and then of the 308th Regiment commanded by Huynh Van Mot when she turned 16 years old.


She helped many officers to travel secretly in and out of inner Saigon, and supplied chemicals, foods, clothes and many other goods to revolutionaries.


She also gave medicine and information to officers arrested at the Catinat police station.


While running errands for the 308th Regiment on Ong Co paddy field, now in Binh Thanh District, in 1948-1949, she was severely injured when enemy airplanes detected revolutionary soldiers, dropping bombs and firing down shots.


In the anti-American war, her health was not good but she made her house a place for officers to stay and organize meetings. She also adopted many children of war martyrs.


Now she lives alone in Ben Thanh Ward, Ho Chi Minh City’s District 1, and has enjoyed benefits from preferential polices for war invalids since the country’s reunification in 1975.


Source: SGGP


Source: QDND

Pakistani woman, Vietnamese war veteran

In Uncategorized on July 28, 2010 at 7:18 am

Ngo Thi Bi Bi, an 80-year-old Pakistani citizen, made great contributions to Vietnam during its resistance wars against France and the US, thus, the president of Vietnam allowed her to change her citizenship to Vietnamese.

Le Ba Can, Secretary of the District 1 Party Committee, Ho Chi Minh City, presents flowers to Nguyen Thi Bi Bi at a congress of the district’s Fatherland Front Committee.

She became an invalid in the anti-French resistance war and then continued to serve during the revolution against the US.
 
She was born Mahamas Bi Bi. Her mother was from Hanoi and her father was a Pakistani merchant who traded in Saigon and Hanoi during the period leading up to the August Revolution of 1945.
 
The daughter of two bloodlines became a revolutionary solider in the anti-French resistance war under sensational circumstances.
 
It was unfortunate when her mother passed away, as she had just turned ten years old.
 
French colonists came back to occupy Saigon and Hanoi from 1945-1946, causing much difficulty for Mr. Mahamas’ business, so he went to Phnom Penh, Cambodia, bringing his daughter along.
 
In the country of temples, he missed his wife and searched for a Vietnamese tutor to bring up Bi Bi, who he loved very much.
 
Ngo Thi Nam, who had just arrived in Cambodia from Vietnam, agreed to work for him and be his daughter’s tutor.
 
Nam was a revolutionary soldier from the Mekong Delta province of Cuu Long, Vietnam, who came to Cambodia to seek shelter because French detectives had sought her.
 
French detectives followed her to Cambodia so she had to return to Chau Doc District in the Mekong Delta An Giang Province.
 
Nam did not have the heart to leave Bi Bi alone in Cambodia, with her father going off to trade in another province, so the tutor brought Bi Bi with her back to Vietnam.
 
At that time, Bi Bi was only 13 years old, apart from her father and live with the tutor, an adoptive mother, and she followed Viet Minh (Vietnam Independence League) from that day.
 
She followed her adoptive mother in conducting revolutionary activities in the vicinity of Gia Dinh.
 
Unluckiness came to her again when her adoptive mother passed away due to a serious illness.
 
Thenceforth, she was reared in a liberated area in Hoc Mon-Ba Diem-Phuc Hoa by many adoptive mothers and sister figures, who were revolutionary soldiers, before reuniting with her father in Saigon
 
She became a messenger of the 15th Platoon and then of the 308th Regiment commanded by Huynh Van Mot when she turned 16 years old.
 
She helped many officers to travel secretly in and out of inner Saigon, and supplied chemicals, foods, clothes and many other goods to revolutionaries.
 
She also gave medicine and information to officers arrested at the Catinat police station.
 
While running errands for the 308th Regiment on Ong Co paddy field, now in Binh Thanh District, in 1948-1949, she was severely injured when enemy airplanes detected revolutionary soldiers, dropping bombs and firing down shots.
 
In the anti-American war, her health was not good but she made her house a place for officers to stay and organize meetings. She also adopted many children of war martyrs.
 
Now she lives alone in Ben Thanh Ward, Ho Chi Minh City’s District 1, and has enjoyed benefits from preferential polices for war invalids since the country’s reunification in 1975.

Source: SGGP

War veteran opens his first painting exhibition

In Uncategorized on July 6, 2010 at 12:15 pm

Painter Dr. Trang Phuong’s sketches and paintings illustrating Vietnam’s revolutionary resistance wars and subsequent building of the nation were on display for the first time at the Ho Chi Minh City Fine Arts Museum on July 3.

Painter Trang Phuong’s “Liberation Army come back”

The 68 works were inspired by the war veteran’s memories of the national resistance movement and revolutionary optimism.


Trang Phuong was born in 1939 in Binh Duong Province. He was in the first class to graduate the Binh Duong Practice Fine Art School before he entered the Sai Gon National Fine Arts College.


He left his family to join the revolution in 1961 and was a founding member of the Liberation Painting Room in 1962.


He graduated from Hanoi Fine Arts University in 1973 and traveled to Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, to enroll in a Ph.D. program at Bulgaria’s Academy of the Fine Arts in 1974. He received Ph.D in fine arts in 1979.


Several of his works are displayed at Vietnam Fine Arts Museum, the Bulgarian Fine Arts Museum and HCMC Fine Arts Museum.


At the ripe young age of 71, Phuong still has a passion for art and continues to paint at his workshop in District 3.


The exhibition titled “Vietnam-My Homeland” will run until July 16.

Source: SGGP

Honored veteran journalist passes away

In Uncategorized on July 1, 2010 at 2:34 pm

Veteran journalist Hoang Tung, former member of the Viet Nam Communist Party Central Committee and editor-in-chief of Nhan Dan (People) Newspaper, passed away in Hanoi on June 29 at the age of 91.

                        Veteran journalist Hoang Tung

The journalist whose given name was Tran Khanh Tho was born in the northern province of Ha Nam in 1920.


He was Party Committee Secretary of Hanoi and Hai Phong and held many other important positions.


He was awarded the Order of the Golden Star, the nation’s highest honor, the Ho Chi Minh Order, the First-class Independence Medal and the First-class Resistance War Medal for his contribution to the country’s independence and development.


He was also granted the Freedom Order (Itsala) by the People’s Democratic Republic of Laos (LPDR).


The body of the former member of the Vietnam Communist Party Central Committee is being kept at the National Funeral House at 5 Tran Thanh Tong Street in Hanoi for people to pay their respects, and will be buried at Mai Dich Cemetery on July 2.

Source: SGGP

Paying last tribute to a veteran revolutionary and journalist

In Uncategorized on May 11, 2010 at 12:47 pm

Veteran revolutionary and journalist Ky Phuong (also known by the the alternative pseudonym, Tran Phong) passed away on May 10 in Ho Chi Minh City at the ripe old age of 90.

Veteran revolutionary and journalist Ky Phuong (also known by the the alternative pseudonym, Tran Phong) (L) and journalist Tran Tam Chi of the Giai Phong (Liberation) Newspaper.

The journalist worked in the newspaper industry for over half a century. He served as editor-in-chief of newspapers Cuu Quoc (National Salvation) and Giai Phong (Liberation).

Journalist Ky Phuong (or Tran Phuong), whose real name is Le Van Thom, was born in the Mekong Delta city of My Tho in 1921.

He joined in the revolutionary movement against French colonial rule in 1940 in the My Tho and Ben Tre Provinces.

He was admitted to the Indochinese Communist Party in 1945.

Mr. Phuong undertook an assignment in Hanoi in 1946 and traveled to Beijing, China where he studied at the Marx-Lenin Institute from 1949 to 1952.

He served as editor-in-chief of the newspaper Cuu Quoc (National Salvation) in the North in 1958.
In early 1964, the revolutionist came back the South and founded the newspaper Giai Phong (Liberation)
After the National Reunification Day on April 30, 1975, he became an assistant to the editorial boards of three newspapers including Tin Sang (Morning news) and the Buddhist publications Giac Ngo, and Cong Giao va Dan Toc (Catholicism and Nation).

He also headed the Municipal Party Committee’s Public Relations Board and served as secretary general of the Vietnam Buddhist Institute of  HCM City.

His service to the country is a shining example that modern Vietnamese journalists may follow.

Source: SGGP

Hanoi’s veteran businesses honoured

In Politics-Society on March 10, 2010 at 8:03 am




Hanoi’s veteran businesses honoured


QĐND – Tuesday, March 09, 2010, 20:22 (GMT+7)

The Association of Hanoi’s Veteran Businesses on March 7th held a New Year meeting to honour collectives and individuals with outstanding achievements.


During the recent past, the Hanoi Veteran Business Association has carried out various practical charity activities and campaigns to help its members with special difficulties, making remarkable contributions to the development of the Association.


Also on this occasion, the city’s Association of Veteran Businesses awarded the “Soldiers with integration process” Golden Cup to 14 activists and members and “Golden Heart” Certificates to 21 other collectives and individuals to acknowledge their good deeds.


Source: HNM


Translated by Vu Hung


Source: QDND

UK veteran footballers to play friendly games in Vietnam

In Vietnam Sports on October 20, 2009 at 7:58 am




UK veteran footballers to play friendly games in Vietnam


QĐND – Monday, October 19, 2009, 20:42 (GMT+7)

Former football stars from Manchester United and Liverpool will play friendly games against veteran Vietnamese footballers during the 2009 Masters Vietnam Football Tournament to take place at My Dinh National Stadium on November 19-20.


The news was announced by the Vietnam Football Federation (VFF) and the DC Media Joint Stock Company (DCM) at a press briefing in Hanoi on October 19.


The tourney offers a great chance for Vietnamese football fans to meet former Premier League stars such as Andy Cole, Andrei Kanchelskis and Vivian Anderson of Manchester United FC, and Mark Walters, Dominic Matteo and John Barners of Liverpool FC.


Event organisers will invite Dermott Gallagher and John Underhill who used to referee many Premier League matches to control the Masters Vietnam tourney. Dermott Gallagher refereed the FA Cup final between Manchester United FC and Liverpool FC at Wembley Stadium in 1996.


Source: VOV


Source: QDND Bookmark & Share

Veteran overcomes difficulties

In Vietnam Lifestyle on September 8, 2009 at 5:29 pm

Invalided out from military service in 1983, Tran Van Kiet (Sau Kiet), with an artificial leg, overcame poverty and neighbors have cherished him for his kindness.








Veteran Tran Viet Kiet overcame difficulties to improve his life, as well as help other people and their difficulties. (Photo: SGGP)

In 1993, Kiet borrowed money from the Hunger Eradication and Poverty Alleviation Fund to open a small food shop. However, in the first two years his shop lost money due to the difficult economic situation. He had to borrow money from his friends to pay his debts.


In 1995, he decided to borrow more money to open a catering service for family parties. He mobilized all his family to cook in order to reduce overheads. Customers gradually came to appreciate his culinary skills.


Kiet said he always listens to customers’ opinions to improve his skills. He is always careful to choose quality produce and ensure food hygiene and safety.


Kiet cleared his debt within a short period and has seen his income rise to nearly VND10 million each month.


As such, he has declined welfare payments to which he is entitled.


When his family was stable, he joined social activities in the ward and district where he lives.


He grants an annual scholarship to poor students in the ward and helps an elderly woman who lives by herself at Phap Quang Pagoda, District 8.


On Tet, he visits and gives presents to poor households and has created jobs for 30 workers in his ward.


Kiet feels happy to help other people and share their difficulties, he said.


 


Source: SGGP

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