wiki globe

Posts Tagged ‘border’

Sudan border clashes kill 36 as south votes

In Uncategorized on January 12, 2011 at 7:07 am

At least 36 people have died in clashes between Arab nomads and southerners near Sudan’s north- south border, leaders in the contested Abyei region said on Monday, on the second day of a vote on southern independence.


Analysts say the central region of Abyei is the most likely place for north-south tensions to erupt into violence during and after the vote, the climax of a troubled peace deal that ended decades of civil war.


Southerners are expected to vote to split from the mostly Muslim north, depriving Khartoum of most of its oil reserves.


Senior southern official Luka Biong condemned the fighting and told Reuters both sides were still trying to settle their bitter dispute over the ownership of Abyei as part of a package of negotiations, including how the regions will share oil revenues after a split.


In a separate, more positive, development, former President Jimmy Carter told CNN on Monday that Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir had offered to take on all of the country’s crippling debt if the south seceded.


Bashir’s spokesman confirmed the south would not take on any of the debt but said the north, south and the international community had a “joint responsibility” to work toward debt relief.


“A division of the debt between the north and south if the south secedes would not be useful … and if the south secedes it will not be able to service this debt,” a statement from the spokesman said.


The comments are a conciliatory gesture from Bashir and will lift a huge fiscal burden from the south in the early days of its expected independence.


The violence in Abyei followed a warning to both northern and southern leaders from U.S. President Barack Obama not to use proxy forces over the voting period, highlighting international concerns that both sides might be resorting to tactics used in past campaigns.


MORE CLASHES FEARED


Leading members of Abyei’s Dinka Ngok tribe, linked to the south, accused Khartoum of arming the area’s Arab Misseriya militias in clashes on Friday, Saturday and Sunday and said they were expecting more attacks in days to come.


The speaker of the Abyei administration, Charles Abyei, said the Misseriya attacked because they had heard false rumors the Dinka were about to declare themselves part of the south.


“A large number of Misseriya attacked Maker village yesterday (Sunday), backed by government militia … The first day one person died, the second day nine, yesterday 13 … It will continue,” he said.


The south’s Biong warned the Misseriya could provoke the wrath of an independent southern Sudan if the attacks continued.


Misseriya leader Mokhtar Babo Nimr told Reuters 13 of his men had died in Sunday’s clash and accused southerners of starting the fighting.


Residents of the central Abyei region were promised their own referendum on whether to join the north or the south but leaders could not agree on how to run the poll and the vote did not take place as planned on January 9.


A U.N. source, speaking on condition of anonymity, said there had been another clash in the village of Todach on Monday morning.


The source said Misseriya were attacking police posts in the area, suspecting them of being occupied by southern soldiers, and said the death count could be higher. “Both sides are concealing their casualties,” the source said, adding southern police and Dinka youth had been caught up in the fighting.

In another sign of tension, southern army spokesman Philip Aguer said two men — a Ugandan and a northern army soldier — were arrested with four boxes holding 700 rounds of AK-47 ammunition in the southern capital Juba on Sunday night.

The northern army’s spokesman, al-Sawarmi Khaled, on Monday denied any link to the ammunition or the clashes.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised the otherwise peaceful roll-out of the vote in the south. “This could be a great example of a peaceful ending to a longstanding conflict,” she said in Abu Dhabi.

PEACEFUL VOTING

Observers said thousands of voters queued up for a second day of voting that continued peacefully across other areas of the south. The final results are expected by February 15, with preliminary results a week earlier.

“Yesterday I tried my best but it was too much for me. Queues were too long. People were too emotional. Everyone wants to be first to decide his destiny,” said Salah Mohamed, waiting outside a booth on the outskirts of the southern capital Juba.

“Today I could vote but still as you can see the crowds are still there … I think the commission might need to extend the voting days.”

The referendum’s organising commission said 20 percent of registered southerners had already cast their vote. The turnout needs to be 60 percent for the result to be valid.

Source: SGGP

Deadly border ambush clouds south Sudan vote

In Uncategorized on January 12, 2011 at 7:07 am

JUBA, Sudan (AFP) – A deadly ambush targeting south Sudanese returning from the north for a week-long independence vote clouded the mood of enthusiasm across the south that saw polling hours extended from Tuesday.


Misseriya Arab tribesmen killed 10 south Sudanese civilians and wounded 18 near the border as they were returning from the north, southern internal affairs minister Gier Chuang said on Tuesday.


“A convoy of returnees coming from the north to the south were ambushed yesterday (Monday) at about 5:00 pm (1400 GMT) by armed Misseriya. Ten were killed and 18 were wounded,” Chuang told a news conference in the southern regional capital Juba.


The landmark independence referendum, which again saw a big turnout on its third day, has prompted tens of thousands of southerners to return from the north.

AFP file – A pedestrian walks on an unpaved road in Juba, the capital of Southern Sudan.

Chuang called for the Khartoum government to be held to account for the attack by the Arab nomad tribe, which was a key auxiliary militia of the northern army during the 1983-2005 civil war and is involved in a continuing conflict with pro-southern Dinka in the disputed border district of Abyei.


“The Misseriya belong to a state and that state has to be held accountable,” he said.


Misseriya chief Hamid al-Ansari denied the tribe had been involved in any ambush of returning southerners but northern police confirmed they had received reports of an attack.


“How could we have carried out such actions when the United Nations is on the ground between us and the Dinka?” Ansari told AFP.


“On top that, for several days now people returning to the south have been a taking a different route far away from us.”


Sudanese police spokesman Ahmed Tahami said: “We have received reports that a convoy of people returning to Bahr al-Ghazal (in the south) was attacked but we have no other details.”


Misseriya tribesmen have stopped southerners returning to the south through their areas several times in the past as part of their conflict with the Ngok Dinka over Abyei.


There has been an upsurge of violence in the district in recent days in which the two sides reported losses totalling at least 33 dead since Friday.


UN chief Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday condemned the latest violence, and the UN Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) said it had intensified its patrolling activities in Abyei and was on standby to reinforce its peacekeeping presence if needed.


Ban “condemns the reported loss of life and calls upon the National Congress Party and Sudan People’s Liberation Movement leadership to maintain calm and ensure that this issue is resolved through peaceful dialogue,” his spokesman said, refering to the ruling parties in Khartoum and Juba.


The head of UNMIS, Haile Menkerios, was in Abyei on Tuesday for consultations with local leaders, a UN spokesman said, while Western governments continued to voice their concerns over the situation there.


“We are monitoring the situation on the ground very closely and urge the people of Abyei and their leaders to exercise restraint,” British Foreign Secretary William Hague said in a statement.


Tensions in the district have been rising with the launch of the independence vote in the south. Abyei had been due to hold a simultaneous plebiscite on its own future, but it has been indefinitely postponed amid deadlock over who should be eligible to vote.


The Misseriya, who migrate to Abyei each dry season to find water and pasture for their livestock, insist they should have the same right to vote as the Dinka, settled farmers who live in the district all year.


In the south, referendum organisers said the huge turnout seen on Sunday and Monday had been repeated across the region and that polling hours were being extended by an hour for the remaining five days of voting.


The huge crowds still queueing to cast their ballots at the end of the original 8:00 am to 5:00 pm voting hours had left many polling stations struggling to cope over the first two days.


The referendum commission’s number two Chan Reec said figures were only available from less than half of polling stations but that at those centres alone, nearly a million of the 3.75 million people registered in the south had already voted.


The prospect of secession by the south had sparked fears of a wider break-up of Sudan, which has experienced other rebellions in the war-torn western region of Darfur and also in the east, where a 12-year uprising ended with a still-fragile peace agreement in 2006.

d
Source: SGGP

S.Korea readies major military drill near tense border

In Uncategorized on December 24, 2010 at 4:29 am

SEOUL, Dec 22, 2010 (AFP) – South Korea prepared Wednesday for a major live-fire drill involving fighter jets and tanks near the tense North Korean border, as Seoul and Washington reacted warily to overtures from Pyongyang.


South Korea’s military said Thursday’s ground and air firing exercise 20 kilometres (12 miles) south of the mainland border would also involve self-propelled guns and 800 soldiers.

The South Korean Navy MSB (Movement Sea Base) floats off the coast of South Korea-controlled island of Yeonpyeong near the disputed waters of the Yellow Sea on December 22, 2010. AFP

Although similar drills have been held at the same firing range at Pocheon many times before, the latest exercise comes with Seoul on high alert for a possible attack from its wayward neighbour.


South Korea’s navy meanwhile began a four-day firing drill Wednesday off the east coast, a relatively distant 100 kilometres (60 miles) south of the border with the North, mobilising six warships plus helicopters.


The military said it would practise responses to intrusions by North Korean submarines and patrol boats.


And South Korean marines were posted to guard a Christmas tree that was lit up Tuesday near the land border, reflecting fears that the North might fire on the display as a propaganda symbol.


Tensions have been high since the North shelled an island near the contested western maritime border last month in response to a live-fire drill by the South. The bombardment of Yeonpyeong killed four people including civilians.


The South staged a repeat drill on Yeonpyeong Monday but the North did not go through with threats to hit back, saying it “did not feel any need to retaliate against every despicable military provocation”.


A senior South Korean military commander said Thursday’s drill at the Pocheon range would “demonstrate our solid military preparedness”.


“We will retaliate thoroughly if the North commits another provocative act like the shelling of Yeonpyeong,” First Armoured Battalion commander Choo Eun-Sik told Yonhap news agency.


The North’s comments late Monday eased fears of war on the peninsula, and it also reportedly offered nuclear concessions to visiting US politician Bill Richardson.


But Seoul and Washington have expressed scepticism about the apparent overtures, coming after an intense bout of sabre-rattling from Pyongyang, whose hardline communist regime is undergoing a generational power shift.


The United States said that North Korea was not even “remotely ready” to resume six-nation nuclear disarmament talks, despite the apparent concessions offered to New Mexico Governor Richardson on his private trip.


The White House made clear there was no change to US policy, despite Pyongyang’s reported offer to re-admit UN nuclear inspectors and sell off fuel rods which could be used to produce plutonium.


President Barack Obama’s spokesman Robert Gibbs said Pyongyang had, over many years and different US administrations, failed to match its words with actions.


“We’re not going to get a table and a room and have six-party talks just for the feel-good notion of having six-party talks,” he said.


“When and if the North Koreans are ever serious about living up to their obligations, then we can think about restarting six-party talks.”


North Korea pulled out of the nuclear talks — which involve the two Koreas, the United States, Russia, China, and Japan — in April 2009 and ordered UN nuclear inspectors out of the country.


It staged a second nuclear test a month later.


Its disclosure last month of an advanced uranium enrichment plant — purportedly to serve a peaceful nuclear power programme — heightened regional security fears.


Richardson, a veteran troubleshooter with the North who was formerly a US ambassador to the UN, unveiled Pyongyang’s apparent concessions after a visit that the White House stressed was unofficial and independent.

d
Source: SGGP

Mexican border city hits 3,000 dead in drug war

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 9:45 am

This year’s death toll in drug-related violence in the border city of Ciudad Juarez, the hardest hit by Mexico’s drug war, rose to 3,000 Tuesday after two men were shot dead on a street, authorities said.


Ciudad Juarez has seen its homicide rate rise to one of the highest in the world after vicious turf battles broke out between gangs representing the Juarez and Sinaloa drug cartels in 2008.


That year, 1,623 people were killed in drug-related violence, and the toll increased to 2,763 deaths in 2009.


With prosecutors’ spokesman Arturo Sandoval announcing the latest grim milestone, a total of 7,386 people have died in the city of 1.3 million people across the border from El Paso, Texas, in three years. Most were members of rival drug gangs, but civilians, police and recovering drug addicts have also been targeted.

A federal police officer stands on a vehicle as he guards the area near a car where two people lie dead in the heavily guarded ‘safe’ zone, the PRONAF, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Monday Dec. 13, 2010.

More than 28,000 people have died throughout Mexico in the four years since President Felipe Calderon launched an offensive against drug cartels when he took office in December 2006.


The U.S. Embassy touted Mexico’s increased cooperation in anti-drug efforts, noting in a statement that on Tuesday Mexico extradited 14 suspects wanted in the United States on drug, organized crime, money laundering, weapons and homicide charges.


The extraditions “represent another victory in our joint fight against organized crime,” the embassy said.


And touting Mexico’s own successes in the offensive, Calderon said Tuesday that a big party led to the demise of a drug cartel chief, who was killed in a shootout with federal police.


The La Familia gang invited hundreds of people to a party last week in the western city of Apatzingan and didn’t bother to keep it a secret, Calderon said in an interview with W Radio.


Federal police learned about it and the shootout broke out when they arrived to investigate, he said. The government says that La Familia leader Nazario Moreno, nicknamed “The Craziest One,” was killed in battles that lasted two days and spread to key parts of Michoacan state, with gunmen blockading roads with burning vehicles.


“What happened those days is that we gave La Familia cartel the biggest blow in its history,” Calderon said. “With a certain amount of insolence, they organized a party, a gathering of hundreds of their people. … Everyone found out about the party.”


The government says cartel gunmen fled with their dead during the shootouts, and Moreno’s body has not been recovered.


After Calderon spoke, the lower house of Mexico’s Congress voted 384-2, with 21 abstentions, to rescind the congressional immunity from prosecution of a fellow legislator accused of links to La Familia.


Congressman Cesar Godoy Toscano has denied the accusations, although tapes have surfaced in which he allegedly chats with a man identified as a leader of the cartel.


Godoy Toscano already faces federal charges for allegedly protecting La Familia, but congressmen in Mexico are given immunity from arrest while in office. Tuesday’s vote suspended him from Congress, but provided that he can return to office if he is acquitted or the charges are dropped.


While Godoy Toscano had filed an appeal against his arrest on the first set of charges, which is still working its way through the courts, the Attorney General’s Office said Tuesday it will file a second set of charges against him alleging money laundering.


A statement by the office did not give specifics of the new charges, or any indication of whether allegedly laundered money may have been used in Godoy Toscano’s election campaign.


The congressman was not present at the vote, and his whereabouts were unclear.

La Familia has been the most flamboyant of Mexico’s drug cartels. The gang claims it is trying to protect Michoacan — Calderon’s home state — from other cartels and common criminals, a message it touts in banners and even in occasional interviews with the news media.

The gang has not bothered to lower its profile since Moreno’s reported death. Sympathizers — some with small children — have marched repeatedly in Apatzingan and the state capital of Morelia, carrying signs supporting the capo and demanding the withdrawal of federal forces.

On Tuesday, the Interior Department issued a statement saying such demonstrations show only the cartels’ “incipient penetration of some local sectors, but not any social support for crime and its tactics.”

Later, in a rare joint statement, federal police, prosecutors, the army and navy urged all three levels of government — local, state and federal — and all three branches of government to work together against drug cartels.

The statement said La Familia members “are nothing more than criminals whose only intention is to terrorize and attack society.”

“Far from protecting Michoacan residents from crime, they deeply hurt them. They commit murders, extortion and kidnappings,” the statement added.

Moreno, 40, the dead drug lord, was considered the ideological leader of La Familia, setting a code of conduct for members that prohibits using hard drugs or dealing them within Mexican territory.

He reputedly handed out Bibles and money to the poor, and wrote a religiously tinged book of values for the cartel, sometimes known as “The Sayings of the Craziest One.”

The gang, specializing in methamphetamine, is also known as one of Mexico’s most vicious. La Familia emerged as an independent organization in 2006, announcing its split from the Gulf cartel when it rolled five severed heads into a nightclub in the city of Uruapan.

Soon afterward, Calderon deployed thousands of federal troops and soldiers into Michoacan, a crackdown he quickly extended to other cartel strongholds in northern and western Mexico. Several top drug lords have been brought down but gang violence has soared to unprecedented levels, claiming more than 28,000 lives in four years.

“I’m a Michoacano and the situation of the state hurts,” Calderon said. “We cannot allow the law of a cartel to rule a state.”

Also Tuesday, the Mexican navy reported it seized nine go-fast boats and a total of 15 metric tons (16.5 tons) of marijuana during two days of searches in the Gulf of California.

The navy said in a statement that patrol aircraft detected three suspicious boats near an island just off the coast of Baja California state on Dec. 11. The three boats were later found abandoned, with 512 packages of marijuana on board.

Two days later, a search by land, air and sea detected six other boats and six suspects in a nearby town. Those boats were carrying 1,058 packages of marijuana.

Source: SGGP

CLV summit pledges border development

In Uncategorized on November 18, 2010 at 1:57 am

12 more border gates to drop immigration declaration

In Uncategorized on November 5, 2010 at 3:55 pm

California deploys National Guard to Mexico border

In Uncategorized on August 19, 2010 at 11:22 am

LOS ANGELES, Aug 19, 2010 (AFP) – California is deploying a first group of 224 National Guard troops to its southern border with Mexico to assist Border Patrol agents attempting to stem the flow of drugs and illegal immigrants.


“Today, our National Guard has been called to help secure the border and protect the safety of the American people,” said Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.


“I am proud that we are the first state to have our troops operational for this mission,” he added at an event in San Diego, a border town some 200 kilometers south of Los Angeles which neigbhours the Mexican city of Tijuana.


Schwarzenegger stressed the deployment was not an alternative to a legislative solution to deal with illegal immigration, an issue President Barack Obama has been unable to tackle amid widespread opposition to immigration reform and amnesty for the millions of people in America illegally.


“We must find a permanent solution to our broken immigration system,” he said.


“We need the federal government to step up with even more manpower and funding, and I will continue to push President Obama and Congress for action.”


Obama last week signed legislation sending drones and an additional 1,500 new agents to the US border with Mexico, which runs across the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.


The legislation also provides an additional 600 million dollars to combat drug, arms and people trafficking across the border.

d
Source: SGGP

Lang Son border forces seizes VND100 million face-value of fake money

In Uncategorized on August 4, 2010 at 3:19 pm




Lang Son border forces seizes VND100 million face-value of fake money


QĐND – Wednesday, August 04, 2010, 20:41 (GMT+7)

PANO – Border soldiers of the Tan Thanh Border Force Station have just apprehended fake money case, according to Deputy-Commander of the station, Senior-Lieutenant Duong Van Thang.


At 20.30 hours on August 1st, a working group of the Tan Thanh Border Force Station caught red-handed, a man carrying VND100 million of fake Vietnamese currency, which he was trying to bring into Vietnam via a path across the border between Vietnam and China in the northern province of Lang Son.


After initial inquiries, the man was found to be Be Van Trinh, born in 1978 in Chi Lang, Lang Son. He said he was hired to carry the fake money to a person in Bac Giang Province to get VND 5 million.


On August 2nd, the command of the Tan Thanh Station handed over the case to the Lang Son Provincial Command to expand the investigation further.

Translated by Thu Nguyen 

Source: QDND

Venezuela sends troops to Colombian border: Chavez

In Uncategorized on July 31, 2010 at 11:19 am

President Hugo Chavez said Friday that Venezuela has deployed military units and troops to the Colombian border, because outgoing President Alvaro Uribe is “capable of anything,” as a row escalates between the two.


Chavez broke off diplomatic relations with Colombia on July 22, one week after Uribe accused Venezuela of harboring 1,500 leftist Colombian rebels in its territory, a charge Chavez has strongly denied.


“We’ve deployed military units, air force, infantry, but quietly because we don’t want to upset anybody, the population,” Chavez told state-run VTV television in a telephone interview.


The leftist leader did not say how many troops and exactly what military ordnance was involved in the move.


“Uribe is capable of anything in these last days” before he leaves office on August 7, said Chavez, who had also threatened to cut off oil supplies to the United States if it backed an attack by Colombia, its chief ally in the region.


Last Sunday the president cancelled a trip to Cuba, claiming the risk of a Colombian attack had never been greater.


The Colombian Air Force on Friday said it would set up an air base in Yopal, in eastern Casanares department, to keep an eye over the border area with Venezuela and take on Colombian rebel forces in the region.


The air base will also be tasked with protecting crude oil installations in the region and also with “fighting the different drug trafficking groups in that part of the Colombian territory,” the air force statement said.


Uribe and Chavez have often been at loggerheads in the past. In November, Chavez broke off diplomatic relations over a US-Colombian military base agreement he said was a threat to regional stability. Chavez also did some sabre-rattling at the time.


In their latest tussle, Colombia took its accusations to the Washington-based Organization of American States (OAS) on July 22, while Venezuela earlier this week went before a foreign ministers’ meeting of regional body Unasur, the Union of South American Nations, which called for a presidential summit to try to resolve the crisis.


Venezuelan Foreign Minister Nicolas Maduro on Tuesday said there was a possibility things could be patched up between Caracas and Bogota when Colombian president-elect Juan Manuel Santos takes over from Uribe next week.


“If the new Colombian government fully rectifies (its position) and adopts a posture of absolute respect for Venezuela’s government and our country, we are sure we can build a new path,” Maduro said.


But just a day earlier another top Venezuelan official, Electricity Minister Ali Rodriguez had stoked the rising tensions with Colombia, warning that his government does “not fear war if it is imposed on us.”


Rodriquez said Bogota’s accusations that Venezuela is harboring Colombian guerrilla leaders were a “foul, vulgar and offensive pretext to attack Venezuela.”


Uribe on Friday defended his decision last week to have the OAS take up accusations that Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and National Liberation Army guerrillas were using bases in Venezuela to stage their anti-government attacks on Bogota.

File photo shows Venezuelan troops close to the border with Colombia

“You have to be daring to denounce terrorists on the international level. You must be daring and respectful of the international community, but honest in laying out our claims,” Uribe said.


“It has been a difficult step, one that crates problems, diplomatic frictions, but it’s necessary,” the outgoing president added.


Uribe leaves after eight years in office with an 80 percent approval rating chiefly for his crackdown on the FARC, which has roughly halved its fighting strength to some 7,000 combatants, according to official figures.

Source: SGGP

Storm Chanthu heads for Vietnam-China border

In Uncategorized on July 22, 2010 at 7:18 pm




Storm Chanthu heads for Vietnam-China border


QĐND – Thursday, July 22, 2010, 21:15 (GMT+7)

Tropical storm Chanthu – the second to hit the East Sea this year – is moving quickly towards China’s Leizhou peninsula and Vietnam’s border Quang Ninh province.


At 10.00am on July 22, Chanthu was positioned at 21 degrees north latitude and 111.1 degrees east longitude, about 350km south-east of Quang Ninh’s Mong Cai town. It continued to regain its strength with winds gusting between 118-133kph near its center.


In the next 24 hours, the storm is expected to move between north and north-west at a speed of 15kph and directly affect the northern part of the Bac Bo (Tonkin) Gulf.


On July 23, Chanthu is forecast to travel along the Vietnam-China border with sustained winds and then begin to weaken into a low pressure system.


On its way, Chanthu will cause rough seas in the Tonkin Gulf and dump heavy rain on north-eastern provinces. It is likely to cause flash floods and landslides in low-lying mountain localities.


The National Steering Committee on Flood and Storm Control reported on July 22 that more than 50,000 vessels with 203,000 fishermen have been brought ashore or returned to storm shelters.


Coastal provinces from Quang Ngai to Quang Ninh have been asked to keep a close watch on the direction of the storm and guide fishing vessels still operating at sea to storm shelters nearby.


Mountain localities have been requested to put forces on standby and move local residents living in flood-prone areas to safe grounds.


On July 22, floodwaters caused by heavy downpours in northern mountain Ha Giang province washed away a boy walking to school in Be Chieu village, Bac Quang district.


Torrential rains accompanied by whirlwinds have caused huge damage to people’s property and subsidiary crops.


Rescue workers have combed through the area to search for the dead body and help local residents overcome the aftermath of the natural calamities.


Source: VOV


Source: QDND