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Posts Tagged ‘Cambodia’

Vietnam’s tourism to be promoted in Cambodia

In Uncategorized on January 8, 2011 at 4:16 am




Vietnam’s tourism to be promoted in Cambodia


QĐND – Thursday, January 06, 2011, 21:19 (GMT+7)

As part of activities and programs organised by the Vietnam Administration of Tourism to promote Vietnam’s tourism to the world, the agency will take part in the Travex (Travel Exchange) 2011 in Cambodia from January 18th to 22nd.


At the coming event, Vietnamese travel agencies will display images of traditional cultural identities, national traditional festivals, and famous architectures and heritages, such as those recognised by UNESCO, such as Ha Long Bay, Thang Long Citadel, Phong Nha – Ke Bang National Park, Hoi An Ancient Town, Central region’s Gongs.


In particular, big posters, featuring scenes of beaches, landscapes and tourist sites, will be introduced to promote Vietnam’s images of people and lands as well as tourist products to foreign visitors.


Source: HNM


Translated by Duy Minh


Source: QDND

Cambodia revises stampede death toll down to 347

In Uncategorized on November 25, 2010 at 2:19 am

PHNOM PENH, Nov 25, 2010 (AFP) – The official death toll from a festival stampede in the Cambodian capital now stands at 347, the social affairs minister said Thursday, after earlier putting the figure at 456.


“The total number of dead victims is 347,” said a letter signed by Social Affairs Minister Ith Samheng, who sits on a committee investigating the disaster.


It said 221 of the victims were women.

The toll was revised following a late-night meeting between committee members, Prime Minister Hun Sen, Phnom Penh and provincial authorities.

Cambodian First Lady Bun Rany Hun Sen wipes away tears as she attends a mourning ceremony with her husband, Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen, on November 25, 2010 in front of the bridge in Phnom Penh. AFP

“We took out the overlapping figures” from some provinces, senior minister Om Yentieng, who sits on the investigating committee, told reporters at a mourning ceremony for the victims in the capital.

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Source: SGGP

Cambodia holds day of mourning for stampede dead

In Uncategorized on November 25, 2010 at 1:19 am

PHNOM PENH, Nov 25, 2010 (AFP) – Cambodia’s prime minister led a mourning ceremony Thursday at the site of a bridge stampede in the capital that killed over 450 people in the worst national tragedy for decades.


A visibly emotional Hun Sen, dressed in black, wiped away a tear and burnt incense at a small altar erected at the foot of the narrow bridge, now cleared of the shoes, clothing and plastic bottles that were a grim reminder of the disaster that unfolded.

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen (R) and his wife Bun Rany (L) grieve during the mourning ceremony on November 25, 2010 in front of the bridge in Phnom Penh. AFP

His wife Bun Rany, wearing a black skirt and a white shirt, stood at her husband’s side and openly cried.


Other government officials also paid their respects during the short ceremony, as a military band played a sombre tune.


Officials said throngs of revellers celebrating the nation’s annual water festival apparently panicked as rumours rippled through the crowds that the bridge to an island in Phnomh Penh was about to give way.


“The deaths happened because the bridge was overcrowded and there was panic that the bridge was collapsing because it is hung by cables and it was swaying,” said Prum Sokha, who heads a panel investigating the tragedy.


“Some started screaming that the bridge was collapsing, that people were getting electric shocks and that the iron cables were snapping, so the people pushed each other and fell down and the stampede happened.


“The people had nowhere to run,” said Sokha, secretary of state at the interior ministry.


The government admitted it had overlooked issues of crowd control, while the victims’ families expressed growing anger about security at the event, which attracted some three million revellers from all over Cambodia.


“We were concerned about the possibilities of boats capsizing and pick-pocketing. We did well, but we did not think about this kind of incident,” government spokesman Khieu Kanharith told AFP.


He said a private firm had been in charge of security on the island and the bridge where the disaster unfolded.


“The place is private, so they used their own security, and police only helped handle order outside,” Kanharith said.


As the first funerals and cremations took place across the country Wednesday, distressed relatives searched for answers.


“I feel very sad and angry about what happened,” Phea Channara said at a funeral service for his 24-year-old sister on the outskirts of Phnom Penh.


“I wonder if the police really did their job. Why did they allow it to happen in the first place?”


Hun Sen has described the disaster as Cambodia’s worst tragedy since the Khmer Rouge’s 1975-1979 reign of terror, which killed up to a quarter of the population.


The premier said a memorial stupa would be built “to commemorate the souls of the people who lost their lives in the incident… and to remember the serious tragedy for the nation and the Cambodian people.”


Social Affairs Minister Ith Samheng told AFP the toll from the tragedy had jumped to 456 dead and 395 injured.


“Some bodies were transported home straight away and some injured people died at home,” he said, explaining the increase.


Exuberant festival-goers had been crossing the bridge to reach an island hosting concerts, food stalls and ice sculptures when the stampede began, resulting in a deadly crush of bodies.


It marked a tragic end to the boat races, concerts and fireworks that are part of the traditional festival, which celebrates the reversal of the flow between the Tonle Sap and the Mekong river.

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Source: SGGP

Anger and grief as Cambodia mourns stampede dead

In Uncategorized on November 24, 2010 at 6:19 am

 Grieving Cambodian families on Wednesday began paying their last respects to relatives among the nearly 380 victims killed in a festival stampede, as anger built over security at the event.


Authorities were probing why the throngs of revellers had panicked at the annual water festival, crushing and trampling people underfoot on an overcrowded narrow bridge in Phnom Penh.


The government admitted it had overlooked issues of crowd control at the three-day event, which attracted some three million revellers to the capital from all over Cambodia.


“We were concerned about the possibilities of boats capsizing and pick-pocketing. We did well, but we did not think about this kind of incident,” government spokesman Khieu Kanharith told AFP.


Cambodian Buddhist monks gather to pray for victims of the stampede in front of the bridge in Phnom Penh on November 23, 2010

A committee had been set up to investigate the cause of the stampede, he said, adding that a private security firm was in charge of the main festival site Diamond Island and its bridges.


“The place is private, so they used their own security, and police only helped handle order outside,” Kanharith said.


As the first funerals and cremations began taking place across the country, bewildered relatives searched for answers.


“I feel very sad and angry about what happened,” Phea Channara said at a funeral service for his 24-year-old sister on the outskirts of Phnom Penh.


“I wonder if the police really did their job. Why did they allow it to happen in the first place?”


Hun Sangheap — who was on the bridge minutes before the stampede happened and helped pull out victims — said the rescuers were slow to respond to the incident.


“The authorities were very late in saving the victims. The company did not manage the security well,” the 32-year-old said, referring to the island’s private security firm.


Prime Minister Hun Sen has described the disaster as Cambodia’s worst tragedy since the Khmer Rouge’s 1975-1979 reign of terror, which left up to a quarter of the population dead. Thursday will be a national day of mourning.


At least 378 people were killed in the stampede and another 750 were injured, government spokesman Phay Siphan told AFP on Tuesday.


Exuberant festival-goers had been crossing the bridge to reach an island hosting concerts, food stalls and ice sculptures before the crowd turned to a deadly crush of writhing and then lifeless human bodies.


In scenes replicated across the city, the dead were laid out in rows under a white tent erected in Calmette Hospital car park, their uncovered faces showing that many had sustained bloody bruises during the stampede.


Military trucks later began delivering the victims back to their relatives.


It was not immediately clear what had triggered the disaster, but Kanharith said a rumour had spread among revellers celebrating one of Cambodia’s biggest festivals that the bridge was unstable.


He said many of the deaths were caused by suffocation and internal injuries, adding that about two-thirds of those killed were women.

One survivor at Calmette Hospital who suffered serious back injuries recalled the anguish of being unable to help others around him as the surging crowd became a suffocating crush.

“I felt selfish when it happened, but I could not help myself. There was a child trapped under me and I wanted to pull him up but I couldn’t,” he said, asking not to be named.

The stampede marked a tragic end to the boat races, concerts and fireworks that are traditionally part of the annual festival to celebrate the reversal of the flow between the Tonle Sap and Mekong rivers.

The event — which saw hundreds of brightly coloured boats take part in races on the Tonle Sap — is popular with tourists but the government said no foreigners were believed to be among the victims.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who visited Cambodia earlier this month, offered her country’s “thoughts and prayers” following the disaster. Other countries to send their condolences include Russia, and Asian neighbours Thailand and Singapore.

Source: SGGP

US sends ‘deep condolences’ to Cambodia stampede victims

In Uncategorized on November 24, 2010 at 4:50 am

WASHINGTON, Nov 22, 2010 (AFP) – The United States on Monday extended its “deep condolences” for the nearly 350 lives lost during deadly stampede in Cambodia’s capital.


“On behalf of President (Barack) Obama and the people of the United States, I offer our deep condolences for the tragic loss of life and the injuries in Phnom Penh during Cambodia’s annual Water Festival,” said US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the victims and with all the people of the Kingdom of Cambodia,” she added in a statement.


Clinton remarked on the “strength and resilience” of the Cambodian people she observed “first hand” during her recent visit earlier this month to the country.


“I am confident that they will pull together and persevere through this difficult time,” she added.


Cambodia began the grim task Tuesday of identifying 347 people — two thirds of them women — crushed to death in a bridge stampede when revellers panicked at a huge water festival in Phnom Penh.

A Cambodian rescue team carries an unconscious woman near a bridge in Phnom Penh where hundreds of people were crushed during a stampede on November 23, 2010. AFP

More than 400 people were also injured in the disaster, Cambodia’s deadliest in decades, which took place late Monday on an overcrowded narrow bridge as millions celebrated the end of the annual three-day event.

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Source: SGGP

Cambodia festival stampede leaves nearly 380 dead

In Uncategorized on November 24, 2010 at 4:50 am

PHNOM PENH, Nov 23, 2010 (AFP) – Frantic relatives scoured makeshift morgues in the Cambodian capital on Tuesday after nearly 380 revellers perished in a huge stampede on an overcrowded bridge, turning a water festival into tragedy.


Survivors recounted scenes of panic and fear on the narrow bridge as people were trampled underfoot by the surging crowds on Monday, with some reportedly falling or jumping into the river below or grabbing on to electricity cables.

Cambodian Buddhist monks gather to pray for victims of the stampede in front of the bridge in Phnom Penh on November 23, 2010. AFP

Prime Minister Hun Sen described the disaster as Cambodia’s worst tragedy since the Khmer Rouge’s 1975-1979 reign of terror, which left up to a quarter of the population dead. He declared a national day of mourning on Thursday.


The United States offered Cambodia “deep condolences for the tragic loss of life”.


At least 378 people were killed in the crush and some 750 were injured, government spokesman Phay Siphan told AFP.


“The number is still going up,” he said.


Exuberant festival-goers had been crossing the bridge to reach an island hosting concerts, food stalls and ice sculptures before the crowd turned to a desperate crush of human bodies.


It was not immediately clear what had triggered the disaster, but another government spokesman said a rumour had spread among revellers celebrating one of Cambodia’s biggest festivals that the bridge was unstable.


“So panic started. It was too crowded and they had nowhere to run,” Khieu Kanharith said.


Many of the deaths were caused by suffocation and internal injuries, he said, adding that about two-thirds of the dead were women.


At the scene of the tragedy, the bridge to Diamond Island was littered with sunglasses and flip-flops and still decked with lights from the huge annual water festival that drew millions into the streets on Monday night.


“There were so many people and they tried to push me and some people stepped on me. I saw a few jump off the bridge,” Meourn Piseth told AFP.


“I felt like I was going to die, I couldn’t breathe,” said the 15-year-old as he received treatment for his badly bruised legs at Preah Ketomealea hospital.


At the site of the tragedy around 400 Buddhist monks, nuns and government officials laid flowers and lit incense sticks while praying for the souls of the dead.


“They didn’t expect to die here… We feel so miserable,” Cambodia’s chief monk Non Ngeth told AFP.


At the city’s Calmette Hospital a man suffering serious back injuries, who did not want to give his name, recalled the anguish of being unable to help others around him as the surging crowd became a suffocating crush.


“I felt selfish when it happened, but I could not help myself. There was a child trapped under me and I wanted to pull him up but I couldn’t,” he said.


Early Tuesday several hundred worried relatives gathered outside the hospital clutching pictures of family members, trying to identify missing loved ones.


The dead, laid out in rows under a white tent erected in the hospital car park, were photographed and numbered by policemen, their uncovered faces showing that many had sustained bloody bruises during the stampede.


One woman said she recognised her 16-year-old niece in the makeshift morgue.


“I heard she was killed last night, so I came here and I saw her body,” Som Khov, 51, told AFP.


After Hun Sen promised that the bodies of out-of-town visitors would be sent home, 13 military trucks began taking away corpses and by evening most of the dead had been removed from the hospital’s makeshift morgue.


The stampede marked a tragic end to the three days of boat races, concerts and fireworks. The annual festival marks the reversal of the flow between the Tonle Sap and Mekong rivers.


The event — which saw hundreds of brightly coloured boats take part in races on the Tonle Sap — is popular with tourists but there was no confirmation that any foreigners were among the victims.


The last time the festival was marred by tragedy was in 2007 when five Singaporeans were killed after their dragon boat, carrying 22 men, capsized at the end of their race.

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Source: SGGP

Families to pay respects to Cambodia crush victims

In Uncategorized on November 24, 2010 at 4:49 am

PHNOM PENH, Nov 24, 2010 (AFP) – Grieving families in Cambodia were due to pay their last respects Wednesday to relatives among the nearly 380 victims killed in a massive stampede at a water festival in the capital.


The annual three-day celebration ended in tragedy on Monday, with survivors recalling scenes of fear and panic as crowds surged on an overcrowded bridge, crushing and trampling people underfoot.

A policeman walks among clothes, shoes and personal belongings left on the Diamond Gate Bridge by the victims of the stampede in Phnom Penh on November 23, 2010. AFP

Relatives were left with a harrowing search through hospitals and makeshift morgues in the capital Phnom Penh, desperate for news of the missing.


Many were faced with the heartbreak of identifying the bodies of their loved ones.


Hundreds of families are set to hold funerals for the victims in the coming days amid a national outpouring of grief.


Prime Minister Hun Sen described the disaster as Cambodia’s worst tragedy since the Khmer Rouge’s 1975-1979 reign of terror, which left up to a quarter of the population dead. He declared a national day of mourning on Thursday.


At least 378 people were killed in the stampede and some 750 were injured, government spokesman Phay Siphan told AFP, adding that the number could rise further.


Exuberant festival-goers had been crossing the bridge to reach an island hosting concerts, food stalls and ice sculptures before the crowd turned to a desperate crush of human bodies.


The dead, laid out in rows under a white tent erected in the city’s Calmette Hospital car park, were photographed and numbered by policemen, their uncovered faces showing that many had sustained bloody bruises during the stampede.


One woman said she recognised her 16-year-old niece among the dead.


“I heard she was killed last night, so I came here and I saw her body,” Som Khov, 51, told AFP.


After Hun Sen promised that the bodies of out-of-town visitors would be sent home, 13 military trucks began taking away corpses.


By late Tuesday most of the dead had been removed from the hospital’s makeshift morgue, delivered back to their relatives.


It was not immediately clear what had triggered the disaster, but another government spokesman said a rumour had spread among revellers celebrating one of Cambodia’s biggest festivals that the bridge was unstable.


Khieu Kanharith said many of the deaths were caused by suffocation and internal injuries, adding that about two-thirds of those killed were women.


One survivor at Calmette Hospital who suffered serious back injuries recalled the anguish of being unable to help others around him as the surging crowd became a suffocating crush.


“I felt selfish when it happened, but I could not help myself. There was a child trapped under me and I wanted to pull him up but I couldn’t,” he said, asking not to be named.


The stampede marked a tragic end to the boat races, concerts and fireworks that are traditionally part of the annual festival to celebrate the reversal of the flow between the Tonle Sap and Mekong rivers.


The event — which saw hundreds of brightly coloured boats take part in races on the Tonle Sap — is popular with tourists but there was no confirmation that any foreigners were among the victims.

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Source: SGGP

Cambodia festival stampede leaves almost 350 dead

In Uncategorized on November 23, 2010 at 2:02 am

VRG builds school in Cambodia

In Uncategorized on November 11, 2010 at 1:52 pm

Vietnamese trade fair held in Cambodia

In Uncategorized on November 7, 2010 at 1:20 pm