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Posts Tagged ‘Coping’

Mekong Delta should focus on coping with climate change, official says.

In Vietnam Environment on November 14, 2009 at 10:34 am

The Mekong Delta is a “hot spot” for climate change, which is a concern for Vietnam, as well as the world, so relevant agencies should focus on the situation, the Minister of Natural Resources and the Environment, Pham Khoi Nguyen, has said.








Farmers work in a rice paddy in the Mekong Delta. The region has recently seen a rise in problems caused by climate change.

Speaking at the first forum of “Climate change in the Mekong Delta,” which wrapped up November 13 in Can Tho City, Mr. Nguyen said the impacts of climate change have already been seen in the delta, with an increase of high tides, storms, floods, droughts and sea-water infiltration.


Therefore, he said, scientists and relevant agencies should choose the delta as a center for their research and help create solutions to ease those negative impacts.


The result of research in the delta will serve as experiences for other regions around the world to deal with the climate change, he said.


There should be a specific plan of action following the forum to improve the public’s knowledge of climate change and to cope with developments of climate change.


The region’s social and economic development plan should also be re-considered so that it can adapt to climate change, he said.


Source: SGGP Bookmark & Share

Coping with challenges

In Social life on October 11, 2009 at 4:18 am




Coping with challenges


QĐND – Saturday, October 10, 2009, 22:22 (GMT+7)

Many mothers and newborn babies in Vietnam, especially those in remote and mountain areas do not receive due care and attention, therefore, the mortality rate of children at birth accounts for 70 percent of the deaths among children under one.


The statement was made by Deputy Health Minister Dr. Tran Chi Liem at a recent seminar in Hanoi on the strategy for children’s survival in the 2009-2015 period initiated by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).


According to the Health Ministry’s statistics, between 2001 and 2006, the mortality rates in children under one-year old fell from 35 to 16 per 1,000 live births, and for children under five from 42 to 26 per 1,000. In comparison over the last decade, the rate has fallen by half, equivalent to regional countries with per capital incomes 3-4 times higher than Vietnam.


The rate of child malnutrition also fell to 19.9 percent in 2008 from 31.9 percent in 2001.


The expanded national vaccination programme has been recognised as the nation’s most successful programme for children’s health care, with 90 percent of children under one now fully vaccinated.


However, Dr. Liem says that the high infant mortality and child malnutrition rate in mountainous and remote areas remains a burnig issue for communities as existing health services are not providing good health care for people for exercising the rights of the child.


According to the Health Ministry, Vietnam is still on the list of the 36 countries with the highest child mortality rates in the world. This list makes up 90 percent of the global total of malnourished children


The country’s medical network and the quality of healthcare services are still not up to scratch, and its spending on health care is much lower than required, at an average of US$7 per person per year, well below the established minimum level of US$34 US$.


The causes of infant fatalities are mostly due to pneumonia, diarrhoea, measles, premature birth, serious infections, and congenital deformities. Shild malnutrition rates remain high, under 40 percent in Tay Nguyen, Quang Nam, Ha Giang and Lai Chau under 40 percent, 17 percent in Hanoi and nearly 9 percent in HCM City.


To reach its millennium development goals (MDGs), Vietnam must make a greater effort to ensure that children across the country, especially in remote and mountainous areas, have access to health services. Vietnam is striving to reduce the mortality rates among children under five to below 18/1,000, among those under one to 15/1,000, and among newborns to 10/1,000 by 2015. it must also reduce malnutrition rates in children under five to below 15 percent (according to weight) and 10 percent (according to height). To fulfill the target, Vietnam must shore up the pediatric and medical system, and improve the infrastructure and quality of healthcare services.


The Ministry of Health published an action plan for provinces and cities to help them to come up with their own ways of dealing with mother and child care issues. It said that not only the State and medical sector but also the whole of society have the responsibility of improving management capacity to deal with these issues.


The Ministry of Health has approved an action plan for child care in the 2009-2015 period with a focus on strengthening and expanding essential child care services. This will reduce the mortality rate in every part of the country and reach the millennium goals by 2015. 


Source: VOV


Source: QDND

Coping with challenges

In Social life on October 10, 2009 at 2:07 am




Coping with challenges


QĐND – Friday, October 09, 2009, 20:43 (GMT+7)

Many mothers and newborn babies in Vietnam, especially those in remote and mountain areas do not receive due care and attention, therefore, the mortality rate of children at birth accounts for 70 percent of the deaths among children under one.


The statement was made by Deputy Health Minister Dr. Tran Chi Liem at a recent seminar in Hanoi on the strategy for children’s survival in the 2009-2015 period initiated by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).


According to the Health Ministry’s statistics, between 2001 and 2006, the mortality rates in children under one-year old fell from 35 to 16 per 1,000 live births, and for children under five from 42 to 26 per 1,000. In comparison over the last decade, the rate has fallen by half, equivalent to regional countries with per capital incomes 3-4 times higher than Vietnam.


The rate of child malnutrition also fell to 19.9 percent in 2008 from 31.9 percent in 2001.


The expanded national vaccination programme has been recognised as the nation’s most successful programme for children’s health care, with 90 percent of children under one now fully vaccinated.


However, Dr. Liem says that the high infant mortality and child malnutrition rate in mountainous and remote areas remains a burnig issue for communities as existing health services are not providing good health care for people for exercising the rights of the child.


According to the Health Ministry, Vietnam is still on the list of the 36 countries with the highest child mortality rates in the world. This list makes up 90 percent of the global total of malnourished children


The country’s medical network and the quality of healthcare services are still not up to scratch, and its spending on health care is much lower than required, at an average of US$7 per person per year, well below the established minimum level of US$34 US$.


The causes of infant fatalities are mostly due to pneumonia, diarrhoea, measles, premature birth, serious infections, and congenital deformities. Shild malnutrition rates remain high, under 40 percent in Tay Nguyen, Quang Nam, Ha Giang and Lai Chau under 40 percent, 17 percent in Hanoi and nearly 9 percent in HCM City.


To reach its millennium development goals (MDGs), Vietnam must make a greater effort to ensure that children across the country, especially in remote and mountainous areas, have access to health services. Vietnam is striving to reduce the mortality rates among children under five to below 18/1,000, among those under one to 15/1,000, and among newborns to 10/1,000 by 2015. it must also reduce malnutrition rates in children under five to below 15 percent (according to weight) and 10 percent (according to height). To fulfill the target, Vietnam must shore up the pediatric and medical system, and improve the infrastructure and quality of healthcare services.


The Ministry of Health published an action plan for provinces and cities to help them to come up with their own ways of dealing with mother and child care issues. It said that not only the State and medical sector but also the whole of society have the responsibility of improving management capacity to deal with these issues.


The Ministry of Health has approved an action plan for child care in the 2009-2015 period with a focus on strengthening and expanding essential child care services. This will reduce the mortality rate in every part of the country and reach the millennium goals by 2015. 


Source: VOV


Source: QDND