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Posts Tagged ‘depression’

Tropical depression affects southern waters

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 10:11 am

A tropical low pressure zone is now centered 240 kilometers east off Khanh Hoa – Ba Ria-Vung Tau provinces’ coast, 9.7-10.7 degrees latitude north and 110.1-111.1 degrees longitude east on Monday.

The position of the tropical depression off Vietnam’s southern coast on December 13 (Photo: national weather bureau)

According to the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center, the winds near the system’s eye have peaked to Category 6 (39-49 kilometers an hour).


In the next 24 hours, the tropical depression will move westward at a speed of 5-10 kilometers an hour, the center stated.


Consequently, the system will move closer to the southern coast. That is, 110 kilometer east off Ninh Thuan to Ba Ria-Vung Tau provinces.


Because of this tropical depression, the waters off Binh Dinh to Ca Mau will become rough, as strong winds affect costal areas.


Meanwhile, a cold front will move south and will affect northern Vietnam by tomorrow morning.


The cold front will cause scattered rains to develop in the north and medium to heavy rain in the central region. The sea will be rough. In conclusion, it will be very cold in the northern mountain areas.

Source: SGGP

Tropical depression to cause rains in southern region

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 10:11 am

The tropical low-pressure system is likely to cause rains in southern central and southeastern regions, especially in Ninh Thuan, Binh Thuan and Ba Ria-Vung Tau provinces.

Construction of the dyke on the Red River’s right bank, is halted due to unusual flooding (Photo: VNA)

From Tuesday onwards, the depression will move westward at 5-10 kilometers an hour, crossing Phu Quy Island in the Binh Thuan Province to affect the mainland, said the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center.


On Monday, the system was centered about 200-220 kilometers east of Khanh Hoa to Ba Ria-Vung Tau provinces.


The Central Flood and Storm Prevention and Control Center and the National Committee for Search and Rescue, have instructed local authorities to secure all boats and it need be guide them away from the dangerous seas. The main area of concern is 7-14 degrees latitude north and 113 degrees longitude east.


Provincial authorities should report any changes about the weather conditions to the central organizations, thereby preparing them for any sea rescue that might occur.


Meanwhile, in the northern region, a cold front has triggered showers in provinces of Lao Cai, Yen Bai and Phu Tho.


The national weather bureau said that the rains have combined with the floodwaters flowing down from the upper reaches, causing unusual flooding in the depleted Red River.


The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development said, the recent heavy rains and the floodwaters, have brought abundant irrigation water for the northern provinces. Until recently this area has experienced a severe drought.


The national weather bureau has forecasted the floodwaters will continue to rise and will peak on the Red River on Tuesday.


Additionally, weather in the north will turn extreme cold, with strong northeasterly winds. Temperature in the famous tourist destination Sa Pa will drop to 4-5 degrees Celsius and at the top of the Hoang Lien Son range, it will only be -1 degree Celsius.

Source: SGGP

Change direction of tropical depression may cause downpours in central region

In Uncategorized on November 14, 2010 at 9:25 am

Tropical depression to cause downpours in flood-stricken central Vietnam

In Uncategorized on November 12, 2010 at 7:53 am

Tropical depression causes more rains to flood hit central region

In Uncategorized on November 5, 2010 at 10:59 am

Megi downgraded to tropical depression

In Uncategorized on October 24, 2010 at 12:02 pm

BEIJING, Oct 24, 2010 (AFP) – Torrential rain battered southwest China Sunday as Typhoon Megi was downgraded to a tropical depression after wreaking havoc in Taiwan and the Philippines.


Megi, the strongest storm to hit the northwest Pacific in two decades, killed 36 people in the Philippines last week and left 12 dead and two dozen missing in Taiwan as it edged towards China.

A man watches as waves crash into rocks in Zhangpu on October 23, 2010 in Fujian province. AFP

But it lost steam after making landfall in southwest China’s Fujian province late Saturday night and China’s state meteorological bureau downgraded it to a tropical depression early Sunday.


Torrential rains were expected in Fujian and neighbouring Zhejiang province throughout the day, the bureau said.


Taiwanese rescuers continued their search for 25 people left missing after Megi’s heavy rains sparked widespread landslides along a coastal highway on the island.


Emergency workers over the weekend dug up nine bodies buried under the debris of a temple swamped by mudslides, while two more were found in houses and one in a port in northeastern Ilan county, the National Fire Agency said.


On Sunday, rescuers discovered the body of a woman at the site of a landside on the highway, a rescue official told reporters.

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Source: SGGP

East Sea choppy from coming tropical depression

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 6:36 pm

A tropical low-pressure system will leave the Philippines’ waters, heading for the East Sea in the next one or two days, said the national weather bureau. It is then expected to move westward at a speed of 15-20 kilometers an hour.


The northern part of the East Sea will be rough and experience rainstorms and strong winds, the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center has forecasted.


Affected by the depression, there are currently thunderclouds over the East Sea, which are slowly heading towards to the waters off from Khanh Hoa to Ca Mau, causing showers and thunderstorms for those southern provinces.

Source: SGGP

Tropical depression to bring rains

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 6:35 pm

Affected by a tropical low pressure zone, which was on the northern part of Truong Sa (Spratly) Islands as of 7am August 19, the waters off the central coastal area between Danang City and Binh Thuan Province will become rough with rains, the national weather bureau said Thursday.

A tropical low pressure zone will bring medium to heavy rains to the central and southern central regions

In the mainland, central and southern central provinces will see medium to heavy rains, some places might experience thunderstorms, said the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center.


The center said residents should keep watch of tornados and strong winds during the thunderstorms.


The tropical depression will slowly move westward at a speed of 5-10 kilometers an hour in the next 24 hours, the center forecasted.

Source: SGGP

Tropical depression to bring rains

In Uncategorized on August 19, 2010 at 11:23 am

Affected by a tropical low pressure zone, which was on the northern part of Truong Sa (Spratly) Islands as of 7am August 19, the waters off the central coastal area between Danang City and Binh Thuan Province will become rough with rains, the national weather bureau said Thursday.

A tropical low pressure zone will bring medium to heavy rains to the central and southern central regions

In the mainland, central and southern central provinces will see medium to heavy rains, some places might experience thunderstorms, said the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center.


The center said residents should keep watch of tornados and strong winds during the thunderstorms.


The tropical depression will slowly move westward at a speed of 5-10 kilometers an hour in the next 24 hours, the center forecasted.

Source: SGGP

Tropical depression halts drilling at Gulf well

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2010 at 11:21 am

Drilling the final feet of a relief well intended to permanently plug the busted BP oil well deep below the Gulf of Mexico will have to wait two to three days as a strengthening tropical depression bears down on the site.


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.

– In this Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2010 picture, a support vessel, foreground center, and others surround the Helix Q4000, background center, used to perform the static kill operation, at the site of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana

Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.


Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation because southeast Louisiana is the “geographic and psychological ‘center of gravity'” for the cases.

Source: SGGP