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Posts Tagged ‘die’

Four people die in flash flood in central Vietnam

In Uncategorized on November 16, 2010 at 4:56 am

35 Vietnamese people die of rabies

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 6:25 pm

Over 35 deaths have been reported in Vietnam in first six months of the year due to rabies, according to a health official.

Rabies cases have increased in recent years in the country, said the Director of the National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Nguyen Tran Hien.


From 2001-2003, around 30 people died resulting from the dangerous disease; however, in 2007, 131 fatalities have been reported; it is 91 and 64 in 2008 and 2009 respectively.


Poor awareness of residents, neglectful behaviors of health workers and the practice of free-range breeding of animals have caused increased number of rabies victims.


In successive years, all health forces concentrated on eradicate these fresh diseases including SARS, influenza H5N1 and H1N1, acute diarrhea, people neglected the dangerous disease commonly caused by dogs.


Lax behaviors have led to low rate of animals being vaccinated with 60 percent of vaccinated dogs in some parts of the country while in other regions, no vaccine has been administered to animals. Due to poor awareness and relaxed behaviors, fatalities resulting from the serious disease still occurred in the country although it in humans and domestic animals is entirely preventable through vaccination.


Assistant Professor Dr. Dinh Kim Xuyen, former Standing Chairman of the National Rabies Prevention Project fretted that residents can rear as many dogs as they wish without vaccination but they didn’t receive any penalties. People can sell or kill animals which have symptoms of the disease. Bitten people practiced a relaxed behavior as they don’t go to the nearby medical clinics to be immunized against rabies.


Dr. Hien warned people should inject their pets and not let them move freely. Infected victims should immediately clean the wound with soap or salt water and go to nearby hospitals for injecting rabies vaccine.

Source: SGGP

59 die in suicide attack on Iraq army recruitment centre

In Uncategorized on August 18, 2010 at 7:23 am

BAGHDAD, Aug 17, 2010 (AFP) – A suicide bomber blew himself up at a crowded army recruitment centre in Baghdad killing 59 people Tuesday, officials said, as violence coinciding with the Muslim holy month of Ramadan raged across Iraq.


The attack, blamed on Al-Qaeda and the deadliest this year, wounded at least another 100 people and came a day after Iraq’s two main political parties suspended talks over the formation of a new government and as the US withdraws thousands of its soldiers from the country.


US President Barack Obama led international condemnation of the attack, with his spokesman insisting the bomber’s attempt to “derail the advances that the Iraqi people have made” would not succeed.

U.S. soldiers carry the flag-draped transfer case containing the remains of Army Specialist Jamal M. Rhett out of a C-17 during a dignified transfer on the tarmac at Dover Air Force Base August 17, 2010 in Dover, Delaware. Assigned to the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Rhett of Palmyra, New Jersey, died Aug. 15 in Ba Qubah, Iraq. AFP

Britain and France joined in, with Paris describing it as “cowardly” and London labelling it “unjustified and vicious.”


Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki ordered a high-level probe into the bombing, which Baghdad security spokesman Major General Qassim Atta blamed on Al-Qaeda.


“The fingerprints of Al-Qaeda are very clear in this attack,” Atta told AFP. “You can see it in the timing, the circumstances, the target and the style of the attack — all the information indicates it was Al-Qaeda behind this.”


An official at Baghdad morgue put the death toll at 59, while a doctor at Medical City hospital, close to the scene of the attack, said they had received 125 wounded.


The bomber blew himself up around 7:30 am (0430 GMT) at the centre, a former ministry of defence building that now houses a local security command, in the Baab al-Muatham neighbourhood in the heart of the capital.


An interior ministry official said the majority of the victims were prospective soldiers seeking to enlist on the last day of a week-long recruitment drive but that some troops who were protecting the compound were also hurt and killed.


“After the explosion, everyone ran away, and the soldiers fired into the air,” said 19-year-old Ahmed Kadhim, one of the recruits at the centre who escaped unharmed from the attack.


“I saw dozens of people lying on the ground, some of them were on fire. Others were running with blood pouring out.”


Kadhim said the recruits, who had to pass two searches to enter the recruitment centre compound, had been divided into groups based on their educational qualifications, with the suicide bomber targeting the selection of high school graduates.


A doctor at Medical City hospital, speaking on condition of anonymity, said several of the wounded remained in critical condition and added that most of the victims were “very young — less than 20 years old.”


Iraqi security forces cordoned off the area following the attack, and security was stepped up across the capital, leading to traffic gridlock during the morning rush hour.


A shop owner in the area, who did not want to be named, blamed negligence on the part of army officers for the attack.


“This is the fault of the officers responsible for securing the area — they let these recruits gather outside the centre without any protection,” he said.


Also on Tuesday, two policemen were gunned down at a security checkpoint in the northern city of Kirkuk, and a senior trade ministry official was shot dead in west Baghdad, security officials said.


Two separate bomb attacks against judges in Baghdad and the central city of Baquba left four of them wounded, the officials added.


The recruitment centre explosion was the bloodiest single attack here since December 8, when coordinated blasts in the capital killed 127 people, and recalls a spate of suicide bombings against army recruitment posts in 2006 and 2007, when Iraq’s insurgency was at its peak.


Violence has surged in the past two months in Iraq, with 200 people already killed in August alone, and the latest bloodletting, which coincides with Ramadan, has sparked concern that local forces are not yet prepared to handle the country’s security on their own.


American commanders insist that Iraqi soldiers are up to the job as they pull out thousands of their forces ahead of a declaration to an end to combat operations at the end of August.


But Iraq’s top military officer has raised doubt about his soldiers’ readiness when the last US troops depart as scheduled at the end of 2011. American forces would need to stay until 2020, Lieutenant General Babaker Zebari said earlier this month.


Iraq is also mired in a political stalemate, with the winner of its March election breaking off talks with his main rival Monday evening, dampening already faint hopes that a government could be formed before Ramadan ends in the middle of September.

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Source: SGGP

59 die in suicide attack on Iraq army recruitment centre

In Uncategorized on August 17, 2010 at 11:22 am

A suicide bomber blew himself up at a crowded army recruitment centre in Baghdad killing 59 people Tuesday, officials said, as violence coinciding with the Muslim holy month of Ramadan raged across Iraq.


The attack, the deadliest this year, wounded at least another 100 people and came a day after Iraq’s two main political parties suspended talks over the formation of a new government five months on from elections, and as the US withdraws thousands of its soldiers from the country.


“We have received 59 corpses this morning,” an official at Baghdad morgue said, speaking on condition of anonymity. A doctor at Medical City hospital, close to the scene of the attack, said they had so far received 125 wounded.

An Iraqi policeman mans a mobile checkpoint where cars are searched in central Baghdad on August 17, 2010, following a suicide bombing at a crowded army recruitment centre in the Iraqi capital early in the morning in which more than 40 people were killed

The bomber blew himself up around 7:30 am (0430 GMT) at the centre, a former ministry of defence building that now houses a local security command, in the Baab al-Muatham neighbourhood of central Baghdad.


An interior ministry official said the majority of the victims were army recruits but that some soldiers who were protecting the recruitment centre compound were also among the casualties.


“After the explosion, everyone ran away, and the soldiers fired into the air,” said 19-year-old Ahmed Kadhim, one of the recruits at the centre who escaped unharmed from the attack.


“I saw dozens of people lying on the ground, some of them were on fire. Others were running with blood pouring out.”


Kadhim said the recruits had been divided into groups based on their educational qualifications, with the suicide bomber targeting the selection of high school graduates.


“I don’t know how he managed to get through all the security measures,” he added, referring to two searches that each recruit had to pass before being allowed in the area. “Maybe he hid in the area from last night.”


Iraqi security forces cordoned off the area following the attack, and security was stepped up across the capital, leading to traffic gridlock during the morning rush hour.


Also on Tuesday, two separate bomb attacks against judges in Baghdad and the central city of Baquba left four of them wounded, security officials said.


The recruitment centre explosion was the bloodiest single attack in Iraq since December 8, when a series of coordinated blasts in the capital killed 127 people.


Violence has surged in the past two months in Iraq, with 200 people already killed in August alone and Iraqi government figures saying that 535 people died in July — the deadliest month in Iraq since 2008. The US military disputes the July figure, saying 222 people died violently.


Violence has surged since the start of Ramadan on August 11, with a spate of weekend bombings and shootings killing 18 people and a car bomb attack on Tuesday killing five, including four Iranian pilgrims.


The bloodletting has sparked concern that local forces are not yet prepared to handle the country’s security on their own.


American commanders, however, insist, that Iraqi soldiers are up to the job as they pull out thousands of their forces ahead of a declaration to an end to combat operations at the end of August.


But Iraq’s top military officer has raised doubt about his soldiers’ readiness when the last US troops depart as scheduled at the end of 2011. American forces would need to stay until 2020, Lieutenant General Babaker Zebari said earlier this month.


Iraq is also mired in a political stalemate, with the winner of its March election breaking off talks with his main rival Monday evening, dampening already faint hopes that a government could be formed before Ramadan ends in the middle of September.


The country’s security forces have been persistent targets at the hands of insurgent groups since the US-led invasion that ousted Saddam Hussein in 2003, as they are seen by militants as a symbol of the government, and representatives of an “occupying force.”

Source: SGGP

Two die in Russia power plant ‘terror act’: firm

In Uncategorized on July 21, 2010 at 3:23 pm

Two people were killed and another two wounded on Wednesday during a “terror act” at a hydroelectric power plant in Russia’s volatile North Caucasus region, state-run power group RusHydro said, citing preliminary information.

File photo of the Baksanskaya hydroelectric power plant in Russia’s Kabardino-Balkaria region

“An explosion took place on the premises of the Baksanskaya hydroelectric power plant” early Wednesday, the company said in a statement. “Two guards died, two people were hospitalized.”


As a result, the power plant’s engine room was on fire, it said.


The power plant is located on the Baksan river in Kabardino-Balkaria, part of the North Caucasus region where Russian authorities are battling a Muslim insurgency.

Source: SGGP

100 foreign troops die in Afghan war in June

In Uncategorized on June 29, 2010 at 8:47 am

KABUL (AFP) – A total of 100 foreign soldiers fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan have died in June, the deadliest month for NATO in nine years of conflict, intensifying concerns about the conduct of the war.


An announcement by the US Department of Defence of the death of an American soldier on June 24 in the strife-torn western province of Farah took the toll for the year to date to 320, compared with 520 in all of 2009.

A memorial to British soldiers killed in action in Afghanistan, at a patrol base in the Nahr e Saraj, Helmand on June 28, 2010. AFP

AFP’s figures are based on a tally kept by the independent icasualties.org website.


The Defence Department said 20-year-old Private Robert Repkie of Tennessee had died on June 24 of “injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident” that was under investigation.


A spokesman for NATO’s International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) said 81 international troops had been killed in combat so far in June.


He said 12 troops had died of non-combat related causes. The remainder, who are not counted by ISAF, had died of injuries after returning home for treatment.


No NATO troops deaths were reported in Afghanistan on Monday, the spokesman said, adding: “A rare good day for us this month.”


The previous highest monthly toll was last August, at 77.


The United States and NATO have 140,000 troops in Afghanistan, set to peak at 150,000 by August in an effort to quell the intensifying war against the hardline Islamist Taliban.


The sacking last week of US General Stanley McChrystal for insubordination has concentrated concerns about the progress being made in bringing the insurgency under control.


His replacement, US General David Petraeus — due to take up the post on July 4, according to military officials — arrives to enormous pressure as casualties rise and Western public opinion continues to turn against the war.


The head of the CIA, Leon Panetta, also acknowledged at the weekend that there were “serious problems” with the Afghan war.


“We’re dealing with a country that has problems with governance, problems with corruption, problems with narcotics trafficking, problems with a Taliban insurgency,” he said.


Lack of action in cleaning up endemic official corruption is seen as an obstacle to progress, as many ordinary Afghans distrust the government the West is fighting to prop up.


On Monday, a senior US lawmaker angrily blocked billions of dollars for Afghanistan, vowing not to extend aid until President Hamid Karzai fulfills pledges to act against corruption.


Representative Nita Lowey, who sits on the powerful committee in charge of the budget, said: “I do not intend to appropriate one more dime for assistance to Afghanistan until I have confidence that US taxpayer money is not being abused to line the pockets of corrupt Afghan government officials, drug lords and terrorists.”


President Barack Obama’s administration requested 3.9 billion dollars in aid for Afghanistan in the 2011 fiscal year starting in October, an aide said.


While much of the anti-Taliban effort is concentrated on the southern provinces of Helmand and Kandahar — the Taliban heartland — a major offensive is under way in the border region of Kunar province, according to ISAF.


It said in a statement Sunday that more than 600 ISAF and Afghan troops were pursuing Al-Qaeda and Taliban militants in Kunar and that “a number of insurgents” had been killed.


Two US troops were also killed, ISAF said, though there was no immediate update Tuesday.


The Washington Post reported that up to 150 Taliban insurgents had been killed in battles along the Kunar border with Pakistan.


The US-led operation, which began Sunday, was one of the largest yet in the region around Kunar province, said the newspaper, citing US officials as calling it “one of the most intense battles of the past year” in Afghanistan.


NATO has said the dramatic upswing in casualty numbers has been caused by the alliance stepping up military operations and taking the fight to the Taliban in areas where the Islamist militia has previously been unchallenged.


The heavy toll can be largely attributed to the Taliban’s use of homemade bombs, or improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which are cheap and easy to make and account for the majority of foreign troops deaths.


The United Nations reported this month that IED attacks had risen by 94 percent in the first four months of this year, compared to the same period in 2009.

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Source: SGGP

Three die in sugar factory accident

In Uncategorized on June 18, 2010 at 4:20 am

An accident at Song Lam Sugar Factory in the north-central province of Nghe An left three dead and one injured on July 11, said the provincial People’s Committee on June 14.

The waste cellar at a Nghe An Province sugar factory where three men died of asphyxiation June 11. (Photo:VTC News)

Le Van Dung from Thanh Chuong District fell into the Anh Son District factory’s waste treatment cellar while on the job, investigators said. Nguyen Xuan Thuyen from Thanh Chuong District then went down the cellar to rescue Dung, according to police reports.


Nguyen Van Hung, an employee at Vietnam Chemical Institute who was working nearby, along with a colleague named Trung also immediately came to aid the two men.


However, all four people lost consciousness in the cellar. Rescue workers eventually pulled the men out, but it was too late for three of them.


Dung and Hung died from asphyxiation in the cellar and Hung died at the Nghe An General Hospital. Trung is being given emergency aid at the hospital.

Source: SGGP

Ten die due to food poisoning in one month in Vietnam

In Uncategorized on June 7, 2010 at 10:26 am

Food poisoning has affected 704 persons, including ten fatalities in the country in last month, released by Vietnam Ministry of Health on June 6.


Of 704 infected people, 517 have recently had to visit hospitals and 10 died. There have been 20 cases of food poisoning in the northern provinces of Ha Giang, Bac Giang, Yen Bai, the highlands province of Gia Lai and the Mekong delta provinces of Ben Tre, An Giang and within Ho Chi Minh City due to microorganisms, toxic mushrooms, carcinoscopius rotundicauda and plectognathi. The causes of seven cases remain unknown.

Doctors of the Viet Duc University Hospital in Hanoi are conducting an operation  using an organ from a brain-dead donor  (Photo: Nguoi Lao Dong – Laborer Newspaper)

Poor hygiene has resulted in a spate of food poisoning cases; the ministry has therefore strengthened scrutiny on food from street vendors and larger enterprises.


The Steering Board on Food Hygiene and Safety in Hanoi said there are over 6,000 food processing firms in the capital city, but just over 2,500 companies have been granted certificates for food hygiene.


In related news, the Ministry of Health has given the green light to the Central Hue Hospital to conduct heart transplant surgery using an organ from brain-dead donors.


The hospital’s operation room is well equipped with state-of-the-art devices to monitor patients around-the-clock.

Vietnam conducted its first-ever liver transplants using an organ from a brain-dead donor at Viet Duc University Hospital’s in Hanoi last May for forty-six male patients from the northern province of Dien Bien, who are now in a stable condition.

The hospital also performed two kidney transplants with organs also taken from brain-dead donors. Although laws allow organ donation from people who are brain dead, it is difficult finding willing donors because many Vietnamese believe that the dead must be buried with all their organs in tact.

Source: SGGP

Thai troops storm into Bangkok protest zone, 2 die

In Uncategorized on May 19, 2010 at 5:02 am

Thai soldiers with armored vehicles stormed into a fortified anti-government encampment Wednesday in central Bangkok, breaking through bamboo barricades and killing at least two protesters in a crackdown after weeks of clashes that have killed dozens.


Once inside the protest zone, troops fired M-16 rifles at fleeing protesters and shouted, “Come out and surrender or we’ll kill you.”


An Associated Press reporter who followed the troops into the protest camp saw the bodies of two men sprawled on the ground, one with a head wound and other apparently shot in the upper body. They were the first known casualties in the assault that began before dawn Wednesday on a 1-square kilometer (3-square kilometer) stretch of downtown Bangkok that protesters have occupied for weeks.

Thai soldiers fire torawds anti-government protesters near a barricade on Wednesday May 19, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand.

It was not clear how many protesters were still inside the encampment. As troops entered the fringes of the area, they passed smoldering fires and hastily abandoned campsites where clothes were still hanging on laundry lines. Shoes were scattered, chairs were overturned and a huge pile of rice was covered with flies.


Government spokesman Panitan Wattanayagorn went on national television four hours after the crackdown began to announce it was under way, speaking first in Thai and then in English.


“The operations will continue throughout the day,” Panitan said. “We would like to reassure the citizens of Bangkok that the operations are designed to make sure we stabilize the area.”


The army action came after weeks of defiance by the protesters who are seeking to oust the government of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva.


“This is D-Day,” said one soldier when asked earlier in the day if this was the final push to clear the protest zone.


Thick black smoke from mountains of burning tires darkened the skies Wednesday, billowing over the skyscrapers of this Asian metropolis of 10 million that has descended into chaos over the last week, with at least 39 killed, most of them civilians.


The violence in Bangkok, a popular stop for tourists heading to Thailand‘s world-famous beaches, has caused concern internationally and raised doubts about the stability of this Southeast Asian nation.


The so-called Red Shirt demonstrators marched into Bangkok in mid-March to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, dissolution of Parliament and immediate elections.


They created an encampment in Bangkok’s posh downtown Rajprasong district in April, surrounding themselves by a barricade of tires and bamboo spears, some of which appeared to be in flames Wednesday.


An estimated 3,000 people were believed to be inside the 1-square-mile (3-square-kilometer) protest zone, which has taken over several blocks of downtown Bangkok’s toniest shopping and tourism district.

Source: SGGP

Thailand in turmoil after 19 die in bloody clashes

In Uncategorized on April 11, 2010 at 10:36 am

Thailand‘s “Red Shirt” demonstrators defied the government and vowed to keep up their protests Sunday, after the country’s worst political violence in decades left 19 people dead and over 800 injured.


Protest leaders, who have promised to maintain their campaign until the government dissolves parliament and calls fresh elections, demanded Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva step down and leave the country.


Fourteen civilians, including a Japanese TV cameraman, and five soldiers were killed in Saturday’s crackdown on the red-shirted supporters of fugitive ex-premier Thaksin Shinawatra in Bangkok, the emergency services told AFP.


The violence erupted when troops tried to clear one of two sites in the centre of the capital occupied by the protesters for the past month. Soldiers fired in the air and used tear gas while the Reds responded by hurling rocks.

A protestor rests on the street after overnight clashes between the army and Red Shirt demonstrators in central Bangkok.

As the clashes intensified gunshots echoed around the city and both sides accused the other of using live ammunition. Emergency services said two protesters were killed by gunshot wounds to the head.


At one stage protesters overwhelmed and captured an armoured personnel carrier, while army spokesman Sunsern Kaewkumnerd said government weapons had fallen into the hands of the demonstrators.


The army later retreated, calling for a truce with the demonstrators, who were holding five soldiers hostage. Thousands of protesters remained on the streets at the two main protest sites on Sunday.


“Abhisit must leave Thailand,” Reds leader Veera Musikapong told supporters. “We ask all government officials to stop serving this government.”


“We call for Abhisit to resign immediately,” added Nattawut Saikuar, another protest leader. He said the protesters would later hold a mourning ceremony for the dead and vowed that those killed “did not die in vain”.


Government spokesman Panitan Wattanayagorn said an investigation had been launched into the violence and that negotiations were under way to bring about a resolution to the stand-off without further unrest.


“The prime minister’s secretary is coordinating with protest leaders to solve the situation and would like protesters to stay put,” he said.


The Thomson Reuters news agency said one its journalists, Japanese cameraman Hiro Muramoto, died after being shot in the chest during the protests.


Tokyo urged Bangkok to investigate the death and called on the Thai government to ensure the safety of Japanese nationals. Related article: Japan urges probe into journalist’s death


The unrest marked Thailand’s worst political violence since 1992 and the United States urged both sides to show restraint.


The mostly poor, rural Reds say the government is illegitimate as it came to power with military backing in 2008 after a court ousted Thaksin’s allies from power.


The protesters called on the country’s revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej to intervene to prevent further bloodshed.


“Did anybody inform the king that his children were killed in the middle of the road without justice?” Reds leader Jatuporn Prompan said. “Is there anyone close to him who told him of the gunfights?”


Although he has no official political role, the hospitalised king is seen as a unifying figure. And during a 1992 uprising he chastised both the military and protest leaders, effectively bringing the violence to an end.

“It’s frightening. We heard explosions and people were running all around,” said Sharon Aradbasson, a 34-year-old Israeli tourist in the city’s historic area near the Khaosan Road backpacker district.

Thai flags, red roses and incense sticks were placed on pools of blood where protesters were killed or wounded.

Subdued tourists mingled with protesters below buildings pocked with bullet holes, some taking photos, a few yards from a clump of ruined cars with their windows smashed in. Shopkeepers nearby swept up glass from a shattered door.

Abhisit offered his condolences over the deaths but refused to bow to the protesters’ calls to resign.

“I and my government will continue to work to resolve the situation,” he said in a televised address to the nation.

Arrest warrants have been issued for many of the senior leaders but so far none is reported to have been taken into custody.

It was the latest chapter in years of political turmoil in Thailand pitting Bangkok’s ruling elite against the mainly working class Reds.

The country has been riven by political tensions since a bloodless coup ousted premier Thaksin in 2006.

Source: SGGP