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Posts Tagged ‘Discovery’

More delays for Discovery shuttle launch

In Uncategorized on November 3, 2010 at 5:12 am

Vietnamese directors film with Discovery Channel

In Uncategorized on June 18, 2010 at 8:33 am




Vietnamese directors film with Discovery Channel


QĐND – Tuesday, June 15, 2010, 20:51 (GMT+7)

Five groups of Vietnamese filmmakers have joined Discovery Channel Asia’s “The First Time Filmmakers” project and learned more about modern filmmaking technology.


In this project, Discovery Channel granted young filmmakers $20,000 each to turn their ideas into 20-minute movies.


Each group had to re-write their scripts up to 10 times, because, according to Discovery Channel experts, only good scripts make good films.


Copyright issues were emphasized by Discovery experts. All characters and images in movies are copyrighted. When Vietnamese filmmakers interviewed any person, they signed a contract, a ready-made form from Discovery, allowing the filmmaker to use his or her images in their movies.


With $20,000 for a short documentary, Vietnamese filmmakers initially thought the funding was more than enough. Discovery representatives asserted that it is only enough for a movie that doesn’t require a lot travel. All projects were therefore carried out in Hanoi.


Discovery Channel clearly defined how much capital would be used for documents, music copyright, interviews, film shooting, directors, etc. The funding was allocated in four supervised stages.


Vietnamese filmmakers said the most important lesson they learned from this program was how to make a film.


Director Phan Y Ly thought that making a documentary film was merely recording the truth, but Discovery Channel asked directors to find good stories and connect them like a feature movie, which has an opening, climax and ending.


Director Phan Duy Linh remarked that Discovery’s style is storytelling based on the truth, while Vietnamese filmmakers closely pursue the truth.


Vietnamese directors learned to tell stories through images, based on strict standards set by Discovery. For an interview, they always had to shoot twice because during the filmmaking process. If the first shoot failed, they could use the second shoot. This helped eliminate errors.


In Vietnam, a documentary often tells only the story of one character, but for Discovery, documentaries must have several characters, including leading and supporting figures.


Director Manh Cuong complained that Discovery Channel experts sometimes intervened in the job of Vietnamese directors deeply.


“They made total changes to some scenes and content in my project,” Cuong explained. “Actually, it is difficult to make a film because each person has a different viewpoint. Vietnamese and foreigners have different views about the same thing in Vietnam.”


He added that the project took two months to create, and “the long time to make this film made people tired.”


Still, it was still a great chance for Vietnamese filmmakers to exchange experiences with Discovery filmmakers. These movies will be broadcast on Discovery channel within the next three years.


Source: VNE /VNN


 


Source: QDND

NASA readies Discovery for takeoff

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 11:36 am

Space Shuttle Discovery sits on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center on April 4, 2010, in Cape Canaveral, Florida. AFP photo

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AFP) – NASA finished fueling the space shuttle Discovery and all systems were ready to go ahead of a Monday launch that will put more women in orbit than ever before.


Discovery’s planned arrival at the International Space Station is tentatively scheduled for Wednesday and will be one of the final missions for the shuttle programme, which will be shuttered later this year.


It is the first shuttle mission with three female crew members and will also mark a first in space, with four women in orbit.


The seven Discovery astronauts were climbing into their bulky, orange launch-and-entry suits after an evening wake-up call. Once suited, they will head to Launch Pad 39A, where Discovery is poised to blast off.


Discovery’s external fuel tanks were filled with about 500,000 gallons (1.9 million liters) of chilled liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen at Launch Pad 39A. The propellants will remain completely full until countdown is completed.


The “tanking” operation ended at 12:21 am, a little less than three hours after it began.


Although the fueling operation began about half an hour later than planned, the delay was not expected to alter the blast-off, planned for 6:21 am (1021 GMT) from Cape Canaveral, Florida.


“The weather forecast calls for an 80-percent chance of good weather for launch, and no weather issues are expected to prevent an on-time predawn liftoff,” NASA said.


It will be the second space shuttle launch for NASA this year. After this flight, only three more are planned before all three remaining US manned orbiters are retired at the end of 2010, ending 30 years of service. The first shuttle flew in April 1981.


During the 13-day mission, Discovery and its crew will deliver over seven tonnes of cargo, including spare bunks for the occupants of the space station, a large tank of ammonia coolant and seven racks filled with science experiments.


American Tracy Caldwell Dyson was headed for the space station aboard a Soyuz spacecraft with two Russian cosmonauts.


Joining Dyson from Discovery will be mission specialists Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger, 34, a former high school science teacher; Stephanie Wilson, 43, a veteran of two shuttle missions; and Naoko Yamazaki, 39, an astronaut with the Japanese space agency since 1996.


Rounding out the Discovery crew are mission commander Alan Poindexter, 48; co-pilot Jim Dutton, 41; mission specialist and spacewalker Rick Mastracchio, 50; and fellow spacewalker Clay Anderson, 51.


Among the gear being hauled into space is a freezer to preserve samples of blood, urine, saliva, plants or microbes used in micro-gravity experiments and then analyzed later back on Earth.


Discovery also will be carrying an exercise machine designed to study the effects of micro-gravity on the body’s musculoskeletal system. Muscles can atrophy during long sojourns in space so astronauts have to take care to exercise regularly.


The supplies, racks and other gear are packed into a pressurized Italian-built module named Leonardo, carried in the shuttle’s bay.

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Source: SGGP

NASA readies Discovery for takeoff

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 11:32 am

Space Shuttle Discovery sits on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center on April 4, 2010, in Cape Canaveral, Florida. AFP photo

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AFP) – NASA finished fueling the space shuttle Discovery and all systems were ready to go ahead of a Monday launch that will put more women in orbit than ever before.


Discovery’s planned arrival at the International Space Station is tentatively scheduled for Wednesday and will be one of the final missions for the shuttle programme, which will be shuttered later this year.


It is the first shuttle mission with three female crew members and will also mark a first in space, with four women in orbit.


The seven Discovery astronauts were climbing into their bulky, orange launch-and-entry suits after an evening wake-up call. Once suited, they will head to Launch Pad 39A, where Discovery is poised to blast off.


Discovery’s external fuel tanks were filled with about 500,000 gallons (1.9 million liters) of chilled liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen at Launch Pad 39A. The propellants will remain completely full until countdown is completed.


The “tanking” operation ended at 12:21 am, a little less than three hours after it began.


Although the fueling operation began about half an hour later than planned, the delay was not expected to alter the blast-off, planned for 6:21 am (1021 GMT) from Cape Canaveral, Florida.


“The weather forecast calls for an 80-percent chance of good weather for launch, and no weather issues are expected to prevent an on-time predawn liftoff,” NASA said.


It will be the second space shuttle launch for NASA this year. After this flight, only three more are planned before all three remaining US manned orbiters are retired at the end of 2010, ending 30 years of service. The first shuttle flew in April 1981.


During the 13-day mission, Discovery and its crew will deliver over seven tonnes of cargo, including spare bunks for the occupants of the space station, a large tank of ammonia coolant and seven racks filled with science experiments.


American Tracy Caldwell Dyson was headed for the space station aboard a Soyuz spacecraft with two Russian cosmonauts.


Joining Dyson from Discovery will be mission specialists Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger, 34, a former high school science teacher; Stephanie Wilson, 43, a veteran of two shuttle missions; and Naoko Yamazaki, 39, an astronaut with the Japanese space agency since 1996.


Rounding out the Discovery crew are mission commander Alan Poindexter, 48; co-pilot Jim Dutton, 41; mission specialist and spacewalker Rick Mastracchio, 50; and fellow spacewalker Clay Anderson, 51.


Among the gear being hauled into space is a freezer to preserve samples of blood, urine, saliva, plants or microbes used in micro-gravity experiments and then analyzed later back on Earth.


Discovery also will be carrying an exercise machine designed to study the effects of micro-gravity on the body’s musculoskeletal system. Muscles can atrophy during long sojourns in space so astronauts have to take care to exercise regularly.


The supplies, racks and other gear are packed into a pressurized Italian-built module named Leonardo, carried in the shuttle’s bay.

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Source: SGGP

Discovery blasts off for International Space Station

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 11:29 am

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida, April 5, 2010 (AFP) – The US space shuttle Discovery blasted off at dawn Monday toward the International Space Station for a mission that will put more women in orbit than ever before.

NASA’s STS-131 astronauts led by Commander Alan Poindexter (R) wave as they walk out of the operations and checkout building at Kennedy Space Center on April 5, 2010. AFP Photo

Discovery lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida at 6:21 am (1021 GMT) as scheduled.


The two booster rockets, which account for 80 percent of the shuttle’s lift during takeoff, peeled away as planned 120 seconds after the launch, falling into the Atlantic Ocean, where they will be subsequently recuperated and reused.

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Source: SGGP

Discovery blasts off for International Space Station

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 11:28 am

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida, April 5, 2010 (AFP) – The US space shuttle Discovery blasted off at dawn Monday toward the International Space Station for a mission that will put more women in orbit than ever before.

NASA’s STS-131 astronauts led by Commander Alan Poindexter (R) wave as they walk out of the operations and checkout building at Kennedy Space Center on April 5, 2010. AFP Photo

Discovery lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida at 6:21 am (1021 GMT) as scheduled.


The two booster rockets, which account for 80 percent of the shuttle’s lift during takeoff, peeled away as planned 120 seconds after the launch, falling into the Atlantic Ocean, where they will be subsequently recuperated and reused.

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Source: SGGP

Discovery readies for Monday launch

In Uncategorized on April 4, 2010 at 11:20 am

WASHINGTON, April 4, 2010 (AFP) – The space shuttle Discovery readied for a Monday morning launch to rendezvous with the International Space Station that will put more women in orbit at the same time than ever before.

The sun rises over Pad 39A (L) on April 3, 2010 as the space shuttle Discovery is prepared for an early morning April 5 launch at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. AFP photo

As Discovery prepared for lift-off with its crew of seven, including three female astronauts, American Tracy Caldwell Dyson headed for the space station aboard a Soyuz spacecraft with two Russian cosmonauts.


Discovery’s arrival at the space station, tentatively scheduled for Wednesday, would mark a first in space, with four women in orbit. It also is also the first shuttle mission with three female crew members.


Joining Dyson from the Discovery will be mission specialists Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger, 34, a former high school science teacher; Stephanie Wilson, 43, a veteran of two shuttle missions; and Naoko Yamazaki, 39, an astronaut with the Japanese space agency since 1996.


Rounding out the Discovery crew are mission commander Alan Poindexter, 48; co-pilot Jim Dutton, 41; mission specialist and spacewalker Rick Mastracchio, 50; and fellow spacewalker Clay Anderson, 51.


Officials at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center gave their thumbs up after their prelaunch briefing for a “go” for Monday’s launch just after sunrise at 6:21 am (1021 GMT) from the Florida facility.


The weather was expected to cooperate. Going into the weekend, forecasts put the chances of favorable weather conditions at 80 percent, said meteorologist Cathy Winters.


After this flight, the second shuttle mission this year, only three more are planned before all three remaining US manned orbiters are retired at the end of 2010, ending 30 years of service. The first shuttle flew in April 1981.


During the 13-day mission, Discovery and its crew will deliver nearly eight tonnes of cargo, including spare bunks for the occupants of the space station, a large tank of ammonia coolant and seven racks filled with science experiments.


“We’re really excited about this mission… and the science we’ll be able to get onboard for the ISS to do what it needs to do and demonstrate its true ability as a national laboratory,” said space shuttle launch integration manager Mike Moses.


Among the gear being hauled into space is a freezer to preserve samples of blood, urine, saliva, plants or microbes used in micro-gravity experiments and then analyzed later back on Earth.


Discovery also will be carrying an exercise machine designed to study the effects of micro-gravity on the body’s musculoskeletal system. Muscles can atrophy during long sojourns in space so astronauts have to take care to exercise regularly.


The supplies, racks and other gear are packed into a pressurized Italian-built module named Leonardo, carried in the shuttle’s bay.


After linking up with the International Space State three days after the launch, Leonardo will be removed from the orbiter and docked to the station for unloading.


Until construction of the orbital outpost is completed, NASA has to ferry spare parts and gear to maintain the space station and service the scientific experiments on board.


Two Discovery astronauts will conduct three space walks lasting six and a half hour each on days five, seven and nine of the mission.


One of their principal, and most complex, tasks will be to replace an empty ammonia tank attached to the rear of the station with one that is full. Ammonia is used in the station’s cooling system.


The ISS, a hundred billion dollar project begun in 1998 with the participation of 16 countries, is financed mainly by the United States.


In presenting his 2011 budget proposal in February, President Barack Obama announced that the space station will be maintained until at least 2020.


Once the shuttle program is closed, the United States will depend on Russian Soyuz spacecraft to ferry their astronauts to the ISS until a new US launch vehicle is ready to take over around 2015.

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Source: SGGP

Space shuttle Discovery lands safely in California

In World on September 13, 2009 at 3:17 am

The Discovery astronauts found sunny skies in California on Friday as they descended to a weather-delayed landing at Edwards Air Force Base to end a demanding two-week mission to the International Space Station.


Earlier in the day, thunderstorms twice prevented the seven astronauts from landing at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, a replay of the foul conditions on Thursday that kept the shuttle orbiting for an extra day.


Discovery discharged a pair of sonic booms as it soared across the California coast at the end of a high speed descent over the Pacific Ocean and touched down at the air base north of Los Angeles at 7:53 pm (0253 GMT Saturday).


“Welcome home, Discovery,” Mission Control radioed shuttle commander C.J. “Rick” Sturckow. “Congratulations on an extremely successful mission.”


Discovery will be hoisted atop a Boeing 747 jumbo jet and flown back to Kennedy late next week as a result of the stormy Florida weather, said Mike Moses, who chairs NASA’s mission management team. The cost of the cross country trip is about 1.8 million dollars.








The US space shuttle Discovery touches down in the Mojave Desert on September 11, at Edwards Air Force Base near Rosamond, California.

Discovery dropped off more than 18,000 pounds (8.1 tons) of supplies, life support gear and scientific equipment at the space station, leaving the space outpost better equipped to house crews of six astronauts as NASA prepares to retire its aging space shuttle fleet by early 2011.


A half-dozen shuttle missions remain, each intended to gradually bring the assembly of the 15-nation space station to an end.


“We’re pretty fat on supplies now, thanks to you,” space station resident Mike Barratt told the shuttle astronauts as they departed earlier this week. “We’re in better shape to carry out our work.”


Fellow American Tim Kopra, who ended a 58-day mission to the space station, was among those aboard Discovery.


“This experience has completely exceeded anything I thought it would it would be like, just in sights and sounds, the experiences,” said Kopra. “It’s been absolutely phenomenal.”


He was replaced on the station by Discovery astronaut Nicole Stott. She joins five Russian, European and Canadian astronauts. She will return aboard shuttle Atlantis, which is tentatively scheduled to launch on November 9 with a load of major external spare parts for the orbital base.


A first time space voyager, Stott has trained to capture Japan’s new HTV cargo capsule with the station’s robot arm as the unmanned supply ship coasts within 30 feet of the station.


The HTV was launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan on Thursday.


The Japanese supply craft, loaded with food, science experiments and other hardware, is expected to reach the station on September 17.


“That will be exciting for us,” Stott said this week. “The vehicle flies up, and we go to work with the big robot arm to pick it out of space — grab it! — bring it in and dock it to the station.”


The HTV is expected to lay a vital roll in the station’s future. As NASA retires the shuttle, it plans to turn to a pair of American commercial rocket companies to haul supplies to the orbital outpost. Both will rely on the same robot arm berthing technique that Japan’s HTV will initiate.


Discovery delivered a pair of major new science experiments that will enable the astronauts to study the behavior of metals, glasses and ceramics as they are heated and cooled in the absence of gravity.


A third new experiment enclosure, a refrigerator, will store blood and other medical specimens collected from the astronauts for studies on how they adapt physically to weightlessness.

During three spacewalks, Discovery’s crew upgraded an external cooling system. Spacewalkers also collected samples of materials that could be included in the fabrication of future spacecraft including a replacement for the shuttle.

The samples were left outside the station a year ago to determine how they would react to the space vacuum, the sun’s ultraviolet radiation and a reactive form of oxygen in the Earth’s upper atmosphere.

During the final outing, astronauts stretched power and data cables to prepare the outpost for one of its last habitable modules. The American furnished “Tranquility” module is scheduled for launching in early 2010.

Inside the outpost, the astronauts installed a new bedroom, replaced a failed piece of life support equipment that removes carbon dioxide from the breathing air and delivered an exercise treadmill named for Stephen Colbert, an American late night television host and satirist.


Source: SGGP

Discovery dodges space debris, landing delayed

In World on September 11, 2009 at 7:36 am

Thunderstorms and high winds forced NASA to abandon its first two attempts to land the space shuttle Discovery, with the next bid for a high-speed descent to Earth set for Friday.


“We know everyone worked it as hard as they could,” shuttle commander Rick Sturckow told mission control when informed of the decision to wave off for the night.


“We will look forward to trying again tomorrow.”


Further bids to bring Discovery home are penciled in for late Friday, and Edwards Air Force Base in California is ready to become an alternative landing site if required, the US space agency said.


“The weather was simply unstable, very unpredictable,” said NASA commentator Rob Navias. “Mother nature had the upper hand today.”


Favorable conditions at Edwards on Friday were forecast to worsen on Saturday due to winds kicked up by Hurricane Linda in the Pacific ocean. The shuttle is equipped with enough provisions to remain in orbit through Sunday.


Earlier, the crew carried out a 14-second evasive maneuver to prevent Discovery from hitting a piece of debris that had apparently drifted away from the shuttle during a spacewalk Saturday, mission control said.


When all was clear, shuttle commander Sturckow and his crew were given the green light to close the doors on Discovery’s big cargo bay and begin other preparations for the planned descent.


Discovery’s return marks the end of a successful mission to the space station during which the crew installed new scientific equipment, overhauled the orbiter’s cooling system and gathered up external experiments.


On Wednesday, NASA mission managers finished an evaluation of the shuttle’s heat shielding, concluding that the fragile thermal barrier was in good shape for the high-velocity descent to Earth.


Sturckow and Discovery pilot Kevin Ford tested the spacecraft’s steering and communications systems as well, finding no problems.


It was during the steering tests that one of the astronauts noticed and captured photographs of a three to four-inch-long (seven to 10-centimeter) strip of material floating away from the shuttle.


Discovery returns to Earth with American astronaut Tim Kopra, who is ending a 57-day mission to the space station, and just over 5,200 pounds (2,300 kilos) of research gear, discarded equipment and trash.


“This experience has completely exceeded anything I thought it would be like, just in sights and sounds, the experiences,” said Kopra. “It’s been absolutely phenomenal.”


He was replaced on the station by American Nicole Stott, who is due to remain aboard the outpost with five Russian, European and Canadian astronauts through late November.


Discovery’s mission, which featured three spacewalks, left the 220-mile (354-kilometer) high space station better equipped to house crews of six astronauts as NASA prepares to retire its aging space shuttle fleet by early 2011.


A half-dozen shuttle missions remain, each intended to gradually complete the assembly of the 15-nation space station.


Source: SGGP