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Posts Tagged ‘Doctors’

HFMD on upward trend in HCMC, say doctors

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 6:24 pm

The number of hand-foot-and mouth cases has been up to 2,373 including one fatality in Ho Chi Minh City since the beginning of the year, said the city’s Preventive Health Center.

HFMD kids have small red spots on the tongue, gums, and inside of the cheeks and painful sores in the mouth


According to a report by the center, some 60 kids suffering from hand-foot-and mouth disease (HFMD), a very common infection in children at this time of year, that is, during the warmer summer months, are rushed to hospitals each week.


Meanwhile the city Department of Health on Sep 27 concerned that the upward trend in the number of hand-foot-and mouth cases would continue as the peak time in next October and November.


Doctors warned parents and teachers to conduct personal hygiene for children to lower the risk of infection including washing hands frequently and correctly, cleaning dirty surfaces and soiled items, including toys, first with soap and water.


HFMD occurs mainly in children under 10 years old but can also occur in adults. Children are more likely to be at risk for infection and illness because they are less likely than adults to have antibodies to protect them.

Source: SGGP

SGGP, doctors conduct charity health checks in city

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 2:31 pm

Saigon Giai Phong newspaper and a group of Ho Chi Minh City doctors on Sep 19 examined and gave free medications to over 1,000 residents in the city’s Binh Chanh District.

Ninety year old Nguyen Thi Hai (L) in Binh Chanh District receives examination (Photo: SGGP)

The highlight of this time charity work was that residents in communes Phong Phu, Da Phuoc and Quy Duc were examined with hi-tech medical equipments. Medical staffs from hospitals in the city including Cho Ray, People 115, and Pham Ngoc Thach University arrived early to carry machines with high care. It took them one hour to arrange all equipment in vehicles.


Hundreds of people from families prioritized under social welfare policies, war invalids and disadvantaged elderly waited for their turns to see the doctors. The charity group carried out examination in class rooms in Nguyen Van Tran pre-school.


It took one day to cover medical check-up and issued free drugs to nearly 1,000 people, bone density tests to 450 patients, as well as checked cervical cancer to 150 women. The group also gave nearly 200 bags of essential medications to Da Phuoc commune’ Medical Center. 


Tran Trong Tuan, chairman of district Binh Chanh, said three poor communes devoted many martyrs and hero mothers to the country’s war, adding that communes have grown rapidly thanks to the government’s care but they are still poor compared to other areas.


Tuan applauded the newspaper and group of doctors have conducted charity examination and treatment to residents there.

Source: SGGP

Doctors save child stabbed in heart, lung

In Uncategorized on August 17, 2010 at 3:22 pm

The Ho Chi Minh City Children Hospital No.1 August 16 announced a success in saving a child who was stabbed in the heart and lung.

The kid in intensive room in the Children Hospital No.1 after the surgery (Photo: SGGP)

The 11 year old child Le Cong Truc in the Mekong delta province of Long An’s district Tan Thanh was taken to the emergency room of the district hospital with an iron stick through his body. Doctors soon cut a wooden part of the  stick and transferred him to the city Children Hospital No.1.


The 20cm iron stick with the outside part moved after the beat of his heart. It has stabbed through right pleura of the lung and right ventricle. When doctors in the  hospital carried out a cardiac surgery, removing the iron stick, the kid’s heart sometimes stopped beating because he lost so much blood.


The child patient had recovered after five days in intensive care. The boy was stabbed when he and other children in the neighborhood hunted mouse in fields, his friends thrust him by chance.

Source: SGGP

Foreign doctors executed, Afghan Taliban claim killing

In Uncategorized on August 7, 2010 at 11:21 am

KABUL (AFP) – The Taliban said Saturday they had killed “Christian missionaries” working in remote northern Afghanistan where the bullet-riddled bodies of two American and six German doctors were found.

US soldiers patrol with Afghan soldiers in Kandahar province on August 6. AFP

The police chief in northern Badakhshan province said the group of foreign eye doctors had been lined up and shot in dense forest, according to the testimony of a sole Afghan survivor. The Taliban later claimed responsibility.


“Yesterday at around 8am, one of our patrols confronted a group of foreigners. They were Christian missionaries and we killed them all,” said Zabihullah Mujahed, a spokesman for the Taliban.


Christian aid group “International Assistance Mission” said it was “likely” the dead had been working for their organisation.


“It is likely that they are members of the International Assistance Mission (IAM) eye camp team,” said the organisation in a statement on their website.


“If these reports are confirmed we object to this senseless killing of people who have done nothing but serve the poor,” it said.


Mujahed said the group consisted of five men and four women foreigners, and one Afghan national, but provincial police chief Aqa Noor Kintoz said there were only only three female foreigners and three Afghans among them.


The Taliban spokesman said the group had been lost in the forest and were killed as they tried to escape.


“They were carrying Persian language bibles, a satellite-tracking device and maps,” he said.


Kintoz said they were shot by armed men in a remote area of Badakhshan province, according to the testimony of “Saifullah”, an Afghan who survived.


The group of eight ophthalmologists had been travelling with three Afghans between Badakhshan and Nuristan provinces and spent a few nights in the forest, he reported Saifullah as saying.


“On the last day they were confronted by a group of armed men who lined them up and shot them. Their money and belongings were all stolen,” said Kintoz.


He said that according to Saifullah’s testimony he had escaped death by reading verses of the Quran, prompting the men to realise he was a Muslim and release him in neighbouring Nuristan province.


The police chief said local villagers had warned the group not to enter the dangerous forested area, but they had insisted they would be safe because they were doctors, according to Saifullah’s statement.


He said the bodies had been found in Kuran wa Minjan district, an area on the border with Nuristan province, one day’s drive from the provincial capital Faizabad.


A US Embassy spokeswoman said “several” American citizens were believed to be among the dead, found on Friday, but could not give further details.


“We have reason to believe that several American citizens are among the deceased…. (We) are actively working with local authorities and others to learn more about the identities and nationalities of these individuals,” the spokeswoman said.


There was no immediate response from German authorities.

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Source: SGGP

Doctors suspect diseased pigs in man’s death

In Uncategorized on May 25, 2010 at 1:16 pm

Doctors try to alter attitudes about tissue gifting

In Uncategorized on May 10, 2010 at 8:47 am

Out of thousands suffering from corneal disease and at risk of going blind, Le Van Doanh, 20, was fortunate enough to receive a trans-planted cornea from a donated source.

Doctors are conducting an eye surgery

Doanh suffered from a genetic corneal defect and began loosing his eyesight when he was twelve years old. Last year, he passed the university entrance exam, but with his eyes getting worse, Doanh was unable to enroll in university.


After waiting desperately for a transplant for over a year, Doanh got lucky. After a successful surgery, he will now be able to live the life of a normal student.


And it was only possible because someone had agreed to donate their corneas.


The Eye Bank under the National Institute of Ophthalmology, the first and the only eye bank in the country since it was opened in 2005, initially received 335 corneas from ORBIS, an international non-profit organisation. ORBIS, however suspended the donation process last year due to the economic downturn, said the Eye Bank’s Dr Nguyen Huu Hoang.


“The main source of corneas is now in-country donation,” said Hoang.


But, he added, since the beginning of the year, the bank has received only five cornea donations, providing transplants for ten patients. With about a thousand people are on the hospital’s waiting list to receive transplants, the odds were long for most patients, Hoang said.


About 300,000 people go blind nationwide every year due to corneal disease, he said. Another 15,000 new cases are diagnosed each year.


The Eye Bank has thereforce collaborate with Red Cross organisations to organise campaigns calling for people’s goodwill.


In other countries, such as the US and India, cornea donations have only become popular in the last few decades. The idea has yet to take root in Vietnam, Hoang said.


“We get the corneas from the dead, Even though the law only requires that we obtain the agreement of a person to donate before he or she dies, in practice, without permission from that person’s family, we cannot get the corneas,” he said.


Le Duc Long from the northern province of Ninh Binh, whose wife passed away in April of last year, donated her corneas even though his family was against the idea. Long said his children were all crying and tried to keep the doctors from coming in to do the surgery after his wife passed away.


“They all felt bad for their mum,” said Long. “They thought that the doctor was going to take out her eyes.”


But, he said, “my family all watched the surgery and realised that they were only taking out the corneas, replacing them with plastic ones which did not make her eyes look different.”


There is still a strong belief system, however, that people want to remain complete after they die.


Even Doanh’s grandparents, despite the success of their grandson’s transplant, were upset when Doanh’s parents signed up to donate their own corneas when they died and refused to donate their own.


“It’s hard to persuade them,” said Doanh. “They don’t want any part of their bodies to be taken out, and we respect their wishes.”


The Eye Bank, however, has not given up hope of changing cultural attitudes. Hoang believed that, with the cooperation of the education and healthcare sectors, people would be increasingly open to cornea or other tissue donation.


In addition to working with the Red Cross, the bank expects to collaborate with hospitals around the country to increase awareness among patients and staff.


“When a person passes away, they can bring vision back to two people and help reduce the burden on society,” said Hoang. “We hope that more people are aware of that and support our bank.”

Source: SGGP

Doctors save bird flu patient using new method

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 9:33 am

For the first time, Vietnamese doctors have saved a patient with a life-threatening case of avian flu (A/H5N1), said the Bach Mai Hospital in Hanoi.

Nguyen Thu Thuy and her three month old child ( Photo: Thanh nien)

The patient is 25-year-old Nguyen Thu Thuy from the district of Soc Son in Hanoi. She was discharged from the Bach Mai Hospital after three weeks of intensive treatment. 


Dr. Nguyen Gia Binh, head of the Intensive Care Department, said Thuy was taken to the hospital in serious condition suffering primary viral pneumonia and multi-organ failure.


Vietnamese doctors consulted with Japanese counterparts to come up with a comprehensive treatment plan that included continuous renal replacement therapy to remove toxins in the patient’s blood, and reduce inflammation and organ damage.


The physicians’ efforts were rewarded after seven days as the woman began to improve and did not require the use of a breathing machine. After 10 days of intensive treatment, doctors said that Thuy’s organs had returned to normal functioning.


Bach Mai doctors also used other methods to help save the woman and are continuing to monitor her.


Dr. Binh said the method was first used in Japan but it is not widely implemented around the world as it is very expensive.


The Disease Control and Prevention Center (DCC) of the International Medical Center of Japan, which has a partnership with Bach Mai, sponsored the treatment process, which cost nearly VND200 million (US$10,500).


Dr. Nguyen Quoc Anh, Bach Mai Hospital’s director, said the new treatment techniques will hopefully pave the way for more successful outcomes in cases of severe or late-stage avian flu cases.


DCC Director Dr. Koichiro Kudo said the challenging case was beneficial for Vietnamese doctors as it improved their knowledge, determination and teamwork.

Source: SGGP

Doctors save bird flu patient using new method

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 9:24 am

For the first time, Vietnamese doctors have saved a patient with a life-threatening case of avian flu (A/H5N1), said the Bach Mai Hospital in Hanoi.

Nguyen Thu Thuy and her three month old child ( Photo: Thanh nien)

The patient is 25-year-old Nguyen Thu Thuy from the district of Soc Son in Hanoi. She was discharged from the Bach Mai Hospital after three weeks of intensive treatment. 


Dr. Nguyen Gia Binh, head of the Intensive Care Department, said Thuy was taken to the hospital in serious condition suffering primary viral pneumonia and multi-organ failure.


Vietnamese doctors consulted with Japanese counterparts to come up with a comprehensive treatment plan that included continuous renal replacement therapy to remove toxins in the patient’s blood, and reduce inflammation and organ damage.


The physicians’ efforts were rewarded after seven days as the woman began to improve and did not require the use of a breathing machine. After 10 days of intensive treatment, doctors said that Thuy’s organs had returned to normal functioning.


Bach Mai doctors also used other methods to help save the woman and are continuing to monitor her.


Dr. Binh said the method was first used in Japan but it is not widely implemented around the world as it is very expensive.


The Disease Control and Prevention Center (DCC) of the International Medical Center of Japan, which has a partnership with Bach Mai, sponsored the treatment process, which cost nearly VND200 million (US$10,500).


Dr. Nguyen Quoc Anh, Bach Mai Hospital’s director, said the new treatment techniques will hopefully pave the way for more successful outcomes in cases of severe or late-stage avian flu cases.


DCC Director Dr. Koichiro Kudo said the challenging case was beneficial for Vietnamese doctors as it improved their knowledge, determination and teamwork.

Source: SGGP

PM orders inquiry into US drug-company kickbacks for doctors

In Uncategorized on March 30, 2010 at 9:58 am

Following reports that the US’s Schering-Plough Pharmaceutical Company incited Ho Chi Minh City doctors to promote two kinds of drugs in exchange for commission, Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has ordered the Ministry of Health to impose penalties on the drug company and doctors who took kickbacks.

Ho Chi Minh City doctors receive high commission if they prescribe the drug US’s Schering-Plough Pharmaceutical Company’s Pegintron 50 mdg and Pegintron 80 mcg ( Photo: SGGP)

The Ministry of Health will liaise with the Ho Chi Minh City People’s Committee to investigate the issue and report to the Prime Minister on suggested penalties for those involved.


Doctors in public HCMC hospitals reportedly received up to VND500 million (US$26,300) monthly as commission for promoting two types of Schering-Plough drugs used to treat viral hepatitis.


Leaders of the city’s Medical University and its hospital held a press conference March 29 to discuss the controversy as related to staff here.


Dr. Phan Chien Thang, deputy director of the Medical University Hospital, said that one his staff, Dr. Truong Ba Trung, has been temporarily suspended from his clinical and teaching work for his reported involvement in the case.


In addition, the hospital has terminated a contract with Dr. Dinh Da Ly Huong, also for allegedly taking kickbacks.


Co-deputy Director of the hospital Dr. Nguyen Hoang Bac said he had ordered the facility’s Pharmaceutical Faculty to investigate all drug prescriptions written recently, especially those for Schering-Plough’s Pegintron 50 mdg and Pegintron 80 mcg used to treat liver disease.


It would then be decided if doctors had prescribed the medicines inappropriately to receive commission.


Dr. Le Quan Nghiem, deputy head of the Medical University-turned-head of the Pharmaceutical Faculty, said the school has also suspended Dr. Nguyen Duc Tuan after rumors surfaced that he was working as a marketing director for Schering-Plough.


The US pharmaceutical company merged with US-based Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD) in 2009 and Ton That Luong Nguyen was appointed chief representative in Vietnam.


Mr. Nguyen reportedly secured a high commission for doctors of 10-30 percent of the cost of the drugs if they prescribed Pegintron 50 mcg and Pegintron 80 mcg for patients.


The monthly turnover in Vietnam of the two types of drugs is around VND6 billion (US$ 315,000). Mr. Nguyen allegedly gained around VND1 billion a month after taking a percentage of the commission made by the doctors.

Source: SGGP

Doctors unhappy hospitals need foreign aid for liver transplants

In Vietnam Health on December 11, 2009 at 10:23 am








Doctors at Children Hospital II perform a liver transplant for baby Tang Ngoc Nhi on December 7 with the assistance of Belgian experts ( Photo: SGGP)

Though the seventh liver-transplant was successfully done last week in Ho Chi Minh City-base Children Hospital II, doctors participating in a conference in Ho Chi Minh City December 10 expressed doubts if Vietnamese hospitals can perform the operation without the assistance of foreign surgeons.


The recent surgery was done with the assistance of Belgian surgeons.


Speaking at the “Surgery for children and Anesthesia” conference, Dr. Truong Quang Dinh, deputy director of Children Hospital II, said Vietnamese doctors do not have the confidence to perform the surgery.


Doctors at his hospital are still practicing it on dogs and mice, he said.


A study he did found 100 babies affected every year with biliary atresia, a condition caused by the blockage or absence of the common bile duct between the liver and small intestine.


His hospital is currently treating 30 toddlers with the condition and half of them need liver transplants, he said.


The Director of the Hanoi-based Central Pediatrics Hospital, Nguyen Thanh Liem, said his hospital too receives hundreds of patients with liver diseases every year and there is a serious need to develop liver-transplant techniques.


Dr. Tran Dong A, former director Children Hospital II, expressed apprehension about the fact that foreign surgeons are still required to perform the surgery.


Related article:
Belgian, HCMC doctors perform city’s 7th liver transplant


Source: SGGP Bookmark & Share