wiki globe

Posts Tagged ‘East’

East Sea experiences fierce stormy weather

In Uncategorized on January 8, 2011 at 4:30 am

The East Sea has turned rough and gloomy, threatening shipping during the next 6 to7 days, the national weather bureau has said.

The East Sea will be very rough in the next several days as cold fronts has clobbered Vietnam

The cold front, which was heading towards Vietnam the previous day, coated and froze some areas in the northern mountainous regions on Wednesday morning.


From today onwards, the cold front will affect other portions in the northern region and then spread to the central region.


The Gulf of Tonkin has seen northeasterly winds up to level 6 (39-49 kilometers an hour) and gusts up to level 8 (62-74 kilometers an hour).

The central and southern parts of East Sea are likely to see even stronger winds.


From January 1 and January 5, two more cold fronts will move into Vietnam, and as a result, the northern region is forecast to get much colder and frost may occur.


In the central and southern seas, the northeasterly winds will strongly operate with waves up to 3-5 meters during the next ten days.


On Wednesday, the National Steering Committee for Flood and Storm Prevention instructed coastal provinces and cities from Quang Ninh to Kien Giang, to notify boats about the changes in weather conditions, so that they may be able to prevent any damage to shipping or loss of life.


In the Red River Delta and the mountainous areas, farmers need to take precautionary measures, in order to protect their rice, cattle, chickens and seafood, from the extreme cold weather.


The southern coastal provinces and Ho Chi Minh City will introduce measures to cope with salt intrusion, caused by the high tide.

Source: SGGP

First commercial flight from Far East lands at Cam Ranh

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 2:29 pm




First commercial flight from Far East lands at Cam Ranh


QĐND – Thursday, December 16, 2010, 21:3 (GMT+7)

The first commercial flight from Vladivostok city, Russia , by the Russian carrier Vladivostok Air landed at the Cam Ranh international airport in the central province of Khanh Hoa on Dec. 15.


Another flight left Cam Ranh for Vladivostok the same day, marking the launch of a direct air route between the two cities.


The airline said two similar flights will be conducted between another Far East city, Khabarov and Cam Ranh on Dec. 16.


According to Vladivostok Air, 14 flights will be conducted on the two routes from mid-December through to March, with two flights every two weeks in the immediate future. The airline will use TU 240 aircraft on the routes, which target Russian tourists who want to escape from serve winter in the Far East . Khanh Hoa boats the famous resort city of Nha Trang with warm weather and sunny beaches.


Cam Ranh Airport ’s authorities pledged to halve the charges on landing and services for Vladivostok Air in the initial period.


Nearly 10 four and five star hotels and resorts in Nha Trang have also agreed to reduce their prices by between 20-50 percent for Russian tourists flying to Nha Trang on the new routes.


Cam Ranh Airport became an international airport in December 2009 and has recorded an average annual growth rate in passenger numbers of 21 percent, the highest rate in Vietnam.


Source: VNA


Source: QDND

China reaches out to tiny, resource-rich East Timor

In Uncategorized on October 28, 2010 at 7:40 am

A jade elephant rears majestically in the corner as patrons tuck into their burgers and fries at one of only three US-style fast-food joints in East Timor, all of which are Chinese owned and operated.


The currency might be the same — the greenback is the unit used in East Timor — and the food is generic, but Brothers Burger restaurant in the dusty capital Dili is not just a slavish copy of its US progenitors.


Part of it is set aside for a compact little toy store, stocked to the rafters with games, gadgets and stuffed animals imported, of course, from China.


Against another wall is a selection of plastic, made-in-China jewellery.


And just in case diners need to leave the country after their meals, they can get their passport photos taken at a Chinese-made booth beside the back door.

Construction work by a Chinese firm begins on the East Timor ministry of defence and military headquarters in Dili

Manager Priscilla Soh said the restaurant’s owners, China-based Brothers Enterprises, specialised in “general supply” so it was only natural to combine the two-year-old eatery with some other sidelines.


“If you dare to come and dare to take the risk then you can earn a profit. I really encourage my Western friends who want to come and invest here,” she said.


As for her Chinese fiends, she said: “It’s not easy because there are too many Chinese here already.”


The burger joints form a meaty new middle layer of Chinese investment in East Timor, a resource-rich country of only around one million people which broke free of Indonesia in 1998 and remains dependent on foreign aid.


At the bottom end of the scale are typical family-run, shophouse-style businesses. At the other is the munificent hand of the Chinese state.


Beijing has lavished millions of dollars on a new presidential palace, a cavernous foreign ministry worthy of a country twice East Timor’s size, and a yet-to-be completed military headquarters.


The buildings are the most impressive new structures in Dili, and have raised more than a few eyebrows across the Timor Strait in Australia, which regards East Timor as part of its regional sphere of influence.


Professor Hugh White, of Australian National University’s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, told ABC radio last month that China’s interest in East Timor is “something Australia needs to pay attention to”.


“Australians have always, going right back into the 18th century, been very sensitive to the idea of major powers projecting force into our part of the world … ” he said.


Sections of the Australian media have made much of East Timor’s purchase in 2008 of two 1960s-vintage Shanghai Class patrol vessels for 25 million dollars, with dark mutterings about “growing military links between Beijing and Dili”.


East Timorese President Jose Ramos-Horta is a friend of Australia’s, but he openly scoffs at such fears.


“I can assure Australians that the East Timorese and China are not going to set up a navy and airbase to invade Australia,” he joked during a recent interview with AFP.


Mocking the “idiots who pass for strategic analysts in Canberra”, he said: “Australia can continue to live in peace, they don’t have to rush to learn Mandarin.”

The Nobel laureate noted that his country’s chief military relationship was with Australia, and complained of double standards from those Down Under who worry about China’s influence in East Timor.

“Australians never worry too much when they sell everything to the Chinese… yet when we buy a few little things from China they get upset, like they’re jealous,” he said.

The president added that, if anything, the ledger was in China’s favour, after East Timor awarded a large commercial contract to a Chinese company to build an electricity plant outside Dili.

“This is a 400-million-dollar project paid for exclusively by ourselves, so any aid that China has given us in the last 10 years you can multiply by 10 and it wont even reach the business deal that we signed with them,” he said.

Source: SGGP

Robust economic recovery in East Asia, says WB

In Uncategorized on October 20, 2010 at 11:03 am

The economic recovery in Vietnam in particular and in East Asia and the Pacific in general is robust, said the World Bank in its latest East Asia and Pacific Economic Update.

The WB Update was announced at a press briefing in Hanoi on Oct. 19.


According to the Update, Vietnam ’s economy has recovered strongly with a GDP growth of 5.3 percent in 2009 and is on the way to the target of 6.5 percent this year. The nation’s foreign investment rose from USD6.9 billion in 2009 to USD7.6 billion in 2010.


In addition, manufacturing companies’ relocation of plants in Southeast Asia is benefiting Vietnam as its workers’ salaries are low and its sea-bordered position is favorable for attracting investment capital.


The Update notes that output has recovered to above pre-crisis levels throughout developing East Asia, and is expanding at near pre-crisis rates in some countries.


Real GDP growth is likely to rise to 8.9 percent in the region in 2010 (6.7 percent excluding China), up from 7.3 percent in 2009 and in line with the average growth rate during the 2000-2008 period. Private sector investment is once again driving growth, confidence is on the rise, and trade flows have returned to pre-crisis levels.


Yet, greater confidence in the region’s growth prospects and concerns about tepid economic expansion in advanced economies is creating the need for policymakers to perform a delicate balancing act — in particular, around the return of large capital inflows and appreciating currencies.


“Should inflows remain strong, especially against a background of weak global growth, the authorities will be faced with the challenge of balancing the need for large capital inflows — especially foreign direct investment — with ensuring competitiveness, financial sector stability, and low inflation,” said Vikram Nehru, World Bank chief economist for the East Asia and Pacific region.


The East Asia and Pacific Update which is published twice yearly is the WB’s comprehensive review of the region’s economies.

Source: SGGP

Storm Megi makes landfall in East Sea

In Uncategorized on October 19, 2010 at 8:10 pm




Storm Megi makes landfall in East Sea


QĐND – Tuesday, October 19, 2010, 22:14 (GMT+7)

Storm Megi made landfall in the Eastern East Sea on October 19 with packing winds near the eye of the storm at 150-183 km per hour.


According to National Hydrometeorological Forecast Centre, the eye of storm was located at 16.5 degrees north latitude and 118.6 degrees east longitude. The storm is forecast to move west with wind speeds of 10-15 km per hour in the next 24 hours and become stronger even over the next few days.


The storm is expected to cause heavy seas with winds speeds reaching more than 180 km per hour at its centre. Fishermen have been advised not to go to sea.


Source: VOV


 


Source: QDND

East Sea choppy from coming tropical depression

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 6:36 pm

A tropical low-pressure system will leave the Philippines’ waters, heading for the East Sea in the next one or two days, said the national weather bureau. It is then expected to move westward at a speed of 15-20 kilometers an hour.


The northern part of the East Sea will be rough and experience rainstorms and strong winds, the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center has forecasted.


Affected by the depression, there are currently thunderclouds over the East Sea, which are slowly heading towards to the waters off from Khanh Hoa to Ca Mau, causing showers and thunderstorms for those southern provinces.

Source: SGGP

Typhoon looms on East Sea

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 6:35 pm

The tropical low pressure zone on East Sea is likely to turn into a storm which might approach the waters off the central coast, the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center has said.

The national weather bureau’s chart shows the tropical depression’s path on August 22

On Sunday afternoon, the tropical depression laid centered 16.1 degrees north latitude and 113.5 degrees east longitude, about 160 kilometers east-southeast off Hoang Sa (Spartly) Islands.


The maximum sustained winds near the zone’s eye reached 39-61 kilometers an hour.


Affected by the tropical depression, the country yesterday saw showers.


According to the centre deputy director Le Thanh Hai, The tropical depression would move westward at 15 kilometers an hour to intensify into a storm.


On Monday afternoon, the storm eye will be at 170 kilometers southeastward off China’s Hainan Island.


Areas on the storm’s path will see winds up to 89-102 kilometers an hour.


Vietnam will continue experience rains on wide areas this afternoon.

Source: SGGP

East Sea choppy from coming tropical depression

In Uncategorized on August 7, 2010 at 11:22 am

A tropical low-pressure system will leave the Philippines’ waters, heading for the East Sea in the next one or two days, said the national weather bureau. It is then expected to move westward at a speed of 15-20 kilometers an hour.


The northern part of the East Sea will be rough and experience rainstorms and strong winds, the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center has forecasted.


Affected by the depression, there are currently thunderclouds over the East Sea, which are slowly heading towards to the waters off from Khanh Hoa to Ca Mau, causing showers and thunderstorms for those southern provinces.

Source: SGGP

New tropical depression heading towards East Sea

In Uncategorized on July 20, 2010 at 11:30 am

A new tropical low-pressure system is set to move from the waters off the Philippines and is to the East Sea by the evening of July 18, according to the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center.


As of 7am this morning, the tropical depression laid centered 16 degrees north latitude and 122 degrees east longitudes, east of Luzon Island. Strongest winds near the storm’s center reached 39-49 kilometers an hour.
 
In the next 24 hours, the system will move west-northwestward at a speed of 15 kilometers and is likely to intensify.


Affected by the tropical depression, the eastern East Sea will be rough with winds up to 61 kilometers an hour.

Source: SGGP

Conson threatens boats on East Sea

In Uncategorized on July 15, 2010 at 1:12 pm

Typhoon Conson moved into the East Sea July 14, after ripping across the Philippines, killing at least 20 people and leaving 60 other missing.

The national weather bureau’s chart of Conson’s movement into the East Sea

At 4am on July 15, the storm was centered 16.5 degrees north latitude and 115.8 degrees east longitude, 400 kilometers east off Hoang Sa (Paracel) Islands, said the National Center for Hydro Meteorological Forecasting. Areas near the storm’s eye experienced sustained winds of 75-102 kilometers an hour.


In the next 24 hours, the typhoon is forecast to move west-northwestward at a speed of 20 kilometers an hour and will intensify.


By 4pm July 16, the typhoon is expected to be just 200 kilometers north of Hoang Sa. Winds near the storm center will reach 89-102 kilometers an hour, with gusts up to103-133 kilometers an hours.


The Central Steering Committee on Flood and Storm Prevention said Conson is a dangerous storm and called on boats to seek shelter.


About 42,298 boats with 190,266 fishermen are reportedly at sea. Authorized organizations have rushed to communicate with the boats to guide them to move out of the Conson’s path. As of July 14, they reported that about 151 boats had not yet been contacted.


According to AFP reports, Typhoon Conson ripped across the Philippines on July 14, killing at least 20 people, destroying shantytowns and causing widespread blackouts that brought the nation’s capital to a standstill.


Sixty other people were reported missing after Conson hit the Southeast Asian archipelago late on Tuesday, then whipped the main island of Luzon throughout the night with wind gusts of 120 kilometres (74 miles) an hour.

Source: SGGP