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Posts Tagged ‘halts’

Boeing halts test flights of delay-plagued 787 Dreamliner

In Uncategorized on November 11, 2010 at 5:22 am

Tropical depression halts drilling at Gulf well

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2010 at 11:21 am

Drilling the final feet of a relief well intended to permanently plug the busted BP oil well deep below the Gulf of Mexico will have to wait two to three days as a strengthening tropical depression bears down on the site.


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.

– In this Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2010 picture, a support vessel, foreground center, and others surround the Helix Q4000, background center, used to perform the static kill operation, at the site of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana

Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.


Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation because southeast Louisiana is the “geographic and psychological ‘center of gravity'” for the cases.

Source: SGGP

Tropical depression halts drilling at Gulf well

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2010 at 11:20 am

Drilling the final feet of a relief well intended to permanently plug the busted BP oil well deep below the Gulf of Mexico will have to wait two to three days as a strengthening tropical depression bears down on the site.


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.

– In this Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2010 picture, a support vessel, foreground center, and others surround the Helix Q4000, background center, used to perform the static kill operation, at the site of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana

Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.


Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation because southeast Louisiana is the “geographic and psychological ‘center of gravity'” for the cases.

Source: SGGP

BP halts Gulf oil flow for first time since April

In Uncategorized on July 16, 2010 at 8:46 am

NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana, July 15, 2010 (AFP) – British energy giant BP says it has temporarily stopped oil flowing into the Gulf of Mexico for the first time in three months as it began key tests hoping to stem the spill for good.


Shortly after BP engineers shut down the last of three valves on a giant new cap placed on the blown-out well at around 2:25 pm (1925 GMT) Thursday, senior vice president Kent Wells announced no oil was leaking into the sea.

AFP/BP — This still image from a live BP video feed shows apparently no oil leaking in the Gulf of Mexico.

“I’m very excited to see no oil flowing into the Gulf of Mexico,” Wells told reporters, but cautioned it was only the start of a painstaking testing process set to last 48 hours to analyze the condition of the underground wellbore.


The announcement was the first sign of real hope for desperate coastal residents who have had their livelihoods ravaged by the worst environmental disaster in US history, now in its 13th week.


Teeming fishing grounds have been closed and tourists have been scared away — two vital economic lifelines for the southern region still struggling to recover from the 2005 Hurricane Katrina.


Endangered wildlife has also been increasingly threatened by huge ribbons of oil fouling the shores of five states — Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. The costly, massive clean-up is likely to last years.


US President Barack Obama, whose administration has led pressure on BP to stop the oil flow, welcomed the news of the capped well as “a positive sign,” but cautioned: “We’re still in the testing phase.” He said he would address the issue again Friday.


BP’s chief operating officer Doug Suttles also warned it was not yet time to celebrate, saying more time was needed as the tests are completed.


“I think it’s an encouraging sign. In a couple of more days it may even be more encouraging, but no celebrations,” Suttles told reporters. “If you go talk to these people that live here, celebration is the wrong word.”


The tests are intended to determine whether the wellbore, which stretches 2.5 miles (four kilometers) below the seabed, was damaged during an April 20 explosion on the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon rig, which sank two days later.


BP is hoping to choke off the oil flow from the well, estimated at between 35,000 to 60,000 barrels a day. But doing so from the top could force oil out in new leaks if the wellbore was damaged.


During the test, engineers will take multiple readings from the 30-foot (nine-meter) capping stack placed on top of the wellhead on Monday to monitor the pressure inside.


High pressure readings would allow the three valves to remain shut and the well would effectively be sealed, but low readings could mean there is a hole somewhere in the casing of the well where oil is escaping.


After 48 hours, the engineers will open up the system again and begin capturing the oil through two surface vessels to allow a new seismic survey to be carried out, said the official in charge of the US response, Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen.


A final solution to the leak is not expected before mid-August, when crews will complete the first of two relief wells, allowing the oil reservoir to be permanently plugged in a “kill” operation.


The Gulf disaster has so far cost BP some 3.5 billion dollars (2.78 billion euros) and compensation claims from devastated residents of the region could reach 10 times that.


Local officials who have seen their coasts sullied by the oil were cautious but hopeful.


Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu described the stoppage as “the first piece of good news the Gulf Coast has received in three months.”


Still “it is too early to declare victory and there is still a lot more work that needs to be done. The next 48 hours will be critical as they test the pressure of the well and ensure the cap is working properly,” Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal cautioned.


“We have been fighting a war against this oil for months now and we know our battles don’t end even when the well is capped. Millions of gallons of oil are still in the Gulf and some estimates show that oil will continue to hit our shores for many more months or maybe even longer.”


Meanwhile the Financial Times reported Friday that BP is speeding up the sale of up to 20 billion dollars (15.5 billion euros) of assets in a bid to boost funds after the Gulf oil spill.


BP is seeking to build up a disaster fund of 20 billion dollars to cover the clean-up costs for the disastrous oil spill.

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Source: SGGP

Hanoi halts plan to build five entrance gates

In Uncategorized on July 16, 2010 at 8:45 am

The capital city will not carry out a planned project to build five welcome gates for the upcoming Thang Long-Hanoi millennial celebrations, announced the Chairman of Hanoi People’s Committee Nguyen The Thao at the 21st session of the Hanoi municipal People’s Council on July 15.

                       A design of welcome gate

Instead Hanoi will be decorated with ornamental flowers, trees and posters. Money collected from businesses to build the welcome gates will be used for resolving pressing social issues and to renovate urban areas, he added.


The city previously planned to revoke over 14,000 square meters of land to build five welcome gates, at a total capital of around VND50 billion (US2.5 million) on roads including Phap Van-Cau Gie, Bac Thang Long, National Road No.5, the National Highway No. 1A and Lang-Hoa Lac.


The city received many opinions from scientists, experts, architects and the public. Most of opinions said that it is waste of money to build unnecessary entrances. The authorities should use VND50 billion to support the poor and resolve social problems.


Furthermore, the Vietnam and Hanoi Architects’ Associations together with many experts did not agree over the design of the proposed welcome gates.


The mayor also pledged that the implementation of decoration works for the grand celebration would be finished before August 15.

Source: SGGP

Vietnam Airlines halts selling domestic low-cost air tickets

In Uncategorized on July 1, 2010 at 6:23 pm




Vietnam Airlines halts selling domestic low-cost air tickets


QĐND – Thursday, July 01, 2010, 21:23 (GMT+7)

Vietnam Airlines (VNA) suddenly announced it would temporarily cease applying its special airfare scheme for agencies participating in a domestic tourism stimulus program between July 1 and August 15, 2010.


Tran The Dung, vice deputy head of the HCM City Tourism Stimulus Group, also director of the Young Generation Tourist Company, said the decision will negatively impact tourist companies and the tourism stimulus program “Vietnam – your destination’’ launched by the Vietnam National Administration of Tourism.


Participating in the stimulus program, VNA had pledged to cut airfares for domestic tours provided by travel agents that join the program until the end of this year, excepting specific holidays.


Travel agents speculated that perhaps so many customers have exploited the low-cost air tickets that VNA had to adjust its program.


Under the Vietnam Airlines’ special airfare program, the HCMC Tourism Stimulus Group attracted 4,052 tourists to central and northern provinces in all-inclusive tours packaged together with low-cost airfares this June.


Tours were offered at rates discounted by 30-35 percent. The number of tourists soared by three times compared to that of May, and ten times over the same period last year when the first tourism stimulus campaign, “Impressive Vietnam,” launched.


After the launch of the first tourism stimulus campaign, authorities and businesses of Vietnam’s tourism industry announced the second tourism stimulus campaign of 2010, “Vietnam – Your destination,” with the hope of attracting more domestic travelers as well as foreign tourists. The program’s goal is to welcome 4.2 million International arrivals and 27-28 million of domestic tourists.


Realizing the opportunity to boost revenues, many businesses within the tourism industry have come to support the new campaign. Hotels, restaurants and other businesses related to tourism have dedicated a variety of discounts to customers participating in the program.


Source: Sai Gon Giai Phong/ VietnamNet


 


Source: QDND

Vietnam Airlines suddenly halts selling domestic low-cost air tickets

In Uncategorized on July 1, 2010 at 2:33 pm

The national flag carrier Vietnam Airlines (VNA) suddenly announced it would temporarily cease applying its special airfare scheme for agencies participating in a domestic tourism stimulus program between July 1 and August 15, 2010, said Tran The Dung, vice deputy head of the Ho Chi Minh City Tourism Stimulus Group. 

Van Mieu Quoc Tu Giam (Temple of Literature), a tourist destination in the North

Mr. Dung, also director of the Young Generation Tourist Company, said the decision will negatively impact tourist companies and the tourism stimulus program “Vietnam – your destination’’ launched by the Vietnam National Administration of Tourism.
 
Participating in the stimulus program, VNA had pledged to cut airfares for domestic tours provided by travel agents that join the program until the end of this year, excepting specific holidays.
 
Travel agents speculated that perhaps so many customers have exploited the low-cost air tickets that VNA had to adjust its program.
 
Under the Vietnam Airlines’ special airfare program, the HCMC Tourism Stimulus Group attracted 4,052 tourists to central and northern provinces in all-inclusive tours packaged together with low-cost airfares this June.
 
Tours were offered at rates discounted by 30-35 percent. The number of tourists soared by three times compared to that of May, and ten times over the same period last year when the first tourism stimulus campaign, “Impressive Vietnam,” launched.


After the launch of the first tourism stimulus campaign, authorities and businesses of Vietnam’s tourism industry announced the second tourism stimulus campaign of 2010, “Vietnam – Your destination,” with the hope of attracting more domestic travelers as well as foreign tourists. The program’s goal is to welcome 4.2 million International arrivals and 27-28 million of domestic tourists.


Realizing the opportunity to boost revenues, many businesses within the tourism industry have come to support the new campaign. Hotels, restaurants and other businesses related to tourism have dedicated a variety of discounts to customers participating in the program.

Source: SGGP

Japan halts beef exports over foot-and-mouth disease

In Uncategorized on April 20, 2010 at 9:48 am

TOKYO, April 20, 2010 (AFP) – Japan on Tuesday suspended its beef and pork exports after detecting suspected cases of foot-and-mouth disease in a cattle herd, in what would be the country’s first outbreak in a decade.


Animal health authorities culled a herd of 16 cows on a farm in the southern prefecture of Miyazaki on Kyushu island after three of the animals showed symptoms of the highly contagious disease, officials said.


Foot-and-mouth disease affects cloven-hoofed animals, also including sheep, goats and deer. It is rarely transmitted to humans but spreads easily between animals, causing them pain and often killing young animals.


A farm ministry official said as a result of the suspected cases, which would be the nation’s first since 2000, “Japan has suspended exports of any meat products from cattle, pigs and other cloven-hoofed animals.”


The southern Miyazaki prefecture said the three cows were found showing symptoms of the disease at a cattle farm in the small town of Tsuno, 850 kilometres (530 miles) southwest of Tokyo.


“Cows suspected of carrying the foot-and-mouth virus have been found in the prefecture,” said Miyazaki Governor Hideo Higashikokubaru. “We must contain the impact as much as possible.”


Japan, a net food importer, exported just 565 tonnes of beef last year, including 347 tonnes sold to Vietnam, 111 tonnes to Hong Kong and 72 tonnes to the United States, the ministry official said.

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Source: SGGP

Nissan halts some vehicle production amid air traffic havoc

In Uncategorized on April 20, 2010 at 9:48 am

TOKYO, April 20, 2010 (AFP) – Nissan said Tuesday it will suspend some car production in Japan because cannot import parts from Ireland due to air traffic disruption brought by the eruption of an Icelandic volcano.


Japan’s third-largest automaker expects to lose total production of 2,000 vehicles a day in two plants from Wednesday due to a shortage of tyre pressure sensors that the company ships from Ireland, spokesman Mitsuru Yonekawa said.


The parts are used in Nissan’s Cube, Murano and Rogue vehicles targeting the North American market, he said, adding that it was undecided when the company will resume production.

This file photo taken on November 12, 2009 shows Nissan Motor workers on a production line at the company’s Tochigi plant in the town of Kaminokawacho, in Tochigi prefecture, north from Tokyo. AFP photo

The part, which is obligatory in cars that run on US roads, raises an alarm if it senses abnormal air pressure, according to the company official.


Production of other models that do not require the component, including the Note minicar, X-Trail SUV and Dualis hatchback, will also be affected by the suspension.


One of two lines in Oppama, located in Yokosuka outside of Tokyo will be shut while both lines in its southern Kyushu factory will be suspended, Nissan said.


The move comes as European airspace remains largely shut due to a cloud of ash created by the eruption of an Icelandic volcano last Wednesday, creating the worst air travel chaos since the attacks on September 11, 2001.


Companies worldwide are losing millions of dollars each day as thousands of airplanes are grounded, and millions of stranded passengers are unable to get back to work.


The Nissan official declined to give a figure on the expected loss from the plants’ suspension. “We had thought that we were pretty much safe from the eruption’s impact but conditions changed on very short notice,” he said.


A fresh cloud of volcanic ash is expected to pass over Britain and Denmark but spare France, the European Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) said Tuesday.


Air traffic has begun to return to normal in parts of Europe but Britain is expecting further disruption, VAAC said, which is one of nine volcanic ash advisory centres around the world.


Nissan, which is tied with France’s Renault, earlier this month launched a partnership with Germany’s Daimler AG, to accelerate sales of low-pollution electric cars, in another sign of consolidation in the global auto industry.

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Source: SGGP

Volcanic ash halts all London flights from 1100 GMT

In Uncategorized on April 15, 2010 at 1:37 pm

LONDON (AFP) – All London flights, including those from Heathrow, will be suspended from noon (1100 GMT) Thursday due to volcanic ash from Iceland that has already caused almost 300 cancellations here, officials said.

This radarcapture obtained from the Icelandic Coastguard on April 14, shows volcanic clouds emanating from an eruption under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier. AFP photo

“All flights in and out of Heathrow and Stansted will be suspended from midday but the terminals will remain open,” a spokeswoman for airports operator BAA told AFP.


“Gatwick airport is subject to a London-wide suspension of all flights arriving and departing from midday,” a spokesman for Gatwick said.

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Source: SGGP