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Posts Tagged ‘imported’

Vietnam to monitor imported food

In Uncategorized on January 12, 2011 at 7:04 am

Governments and animal health departments will closely inspect any food imports from overseas countries into Vietnam, said the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.


In a recent dispatch to provinces and cities around the country, the Ministry has ordered all provincial and municipal governments and relevant agencies, to supervise any animal products imported from foreign countries into Vietnam. As the Tet holiday is quickly approaching, consumption of foreign imports could be very high.


The Ministry has also asked government officials, to closely monitor border crossings, especially the ones like Tan Thanh, in the Northern Province of Lang Son; Cau Treo and Lao Bao in the central province of Ha Tinh; and finally, Quang Tri and Moc Bai, in the southern province of Tay Ninh.



 

Source: SGGP

Vietnam keeps track of imported milk prices

In Uncategorized on October 13, 2010 at 7:48 am

As of September 27, the General Department of Customs requested local customs to pay attention to checking imported milk prices.

Vietnam issues new decision to control milk product prices to protect customers’ benefits

If the difference in imported milk prices among the same kind of products is over 10 percent, it’s necessary to check those products after customs clearance, said the General Department of Customs in its dispatch.


In addition, local customs need to investigate unusual declaration on milk prices before allowing products to be imported into Vietnam.


Concerning to strictly controlling prices of imported dairy products, the Ministry of Finance (MoF) issued the Circular No 122/2010 which comes into effect on October 1.


The circular rules that dairy companies must register prices of imported milk with the MoF’s Price Management Department or the provincial departments of finance before selling products in the market.


The Government will apply measures to curb dairy prices if the prices are unusually varied because dairy is classified in the list of items need to be stabilized.



 

Source: SGGP

Vietnam to revamp imported meat inspections

In Uncategorized on June 29, 2010 at 8:47 am

The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) has issued a new regulation calling for stricter meat import inspections to end Vietnam’s ongoing “dirty meat” saga that began in 2008.


The new MARD decree on required food hygiene, which will take effect July 1, requires exporter countries to register their domestic businesses that can meet hygiene demands with Vietnamese agencies.

(Files) Meat sold at a market in Hanoi

The regulation stipulates that only these enterprises will be able to export meat into Vietnam. Certificates of safety must be enclosed with import consignments, according to the new rule.


MARD said that in the first five months of 2010, frozen meat imports (poultry and meats) increased three-fold over the last months of 2009.  Pork imports alone have reached 500,000 tons, consisting mainly of heads, feet and tails.


However, this year’s outbreaks of the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus, also called “Blue Ear,” has stalled containers of frozen chicken and pigs at ports in the northern city of Hai Phong, the border town of Mong Cai in the north and Ho Chi Minh City. Containers of frozen chickens and pigs are also stuck at Dinh Vu Port in Hai Phong City.


But many businesses have been trying to avoid the stricter inspections by importing large shipments before the regulation takes effect, the department said.


However, MARD also said that all newly imported containers would be placed under scrutiny and that importers would be ordered to re-export food if shipments are found to have skirted hygiene requirements. Warnings would also be sent to exporting countries.


Companies found to have intentionally breached regulations would be shut down, the department said.


At the same time household farmers and food processing firms said they were concerned over the massive meat imports that they say will put pressure on domestic breeding.


Since 2008, tens of tons of unsafe meat have been imported into Vietnam in what the press has deemed “the dirty meat saga”

Source: SGGP

EU urged to abolish anti-dumping duties on imported shoes

In Vietnam Economy on October 14, 2009 at 4:29 am




EU urged to abolish anti-dumping duties on imported shoes


QĐND – Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 21:4 (GMT+7)

EuroCommerce, which represents the retail, wholesale and international trade sectors in Europe, has urged the European Union to eliminate anti-dumping tariffs on leather shoes imported from Vietnam and China in January 2010.


“Any extension of the EU anti-dumping duties on imports of leather footwear from China and Vietnam could damage the consumer purchasing power and hamper Europe’s economic recovery,” said EuroCommerce Secretary-General, Xavier Durieu, in a press release on October 12. “EuroCommerce urges European leaders to give their assurance now that the measures will end in January 2010.”



 

In 2006, the EU decided to impose duties on imports of Chinese and Vietnamese footwear for two years only. An expiry review requested by producers led to a 15 month extension. Now, on the eve of expiry, any additional political ‘horse trading’ would both be detrimental to consumers, importers and retailers alike and would also damage adherence to the principles of the European Trade Defence system.


According to EuroCommerce, it is now time for the EU to keep its promise and to terminate these unjustified duties. European leaders must understand that abolishing these measures is essential to promote a truly competitive European industry, stimulate consumer demand and give the economy a boost it badly needs.


Sources from Brussels say EU member states are divided over whether or not to extend the deadline. Shoemakers and many other European governments have strongly protested against the EU’s extension plan. In addition, the measures adopted by the EU have not proved effective. Shoe imports from China and Vietnam have come to a halt but those from Indonesia and Thailand have increased dramatically.


The European Footwear Alliance (EFA), which represents famous brands such as Nike, Adidas and Timberland, says shoe prices have increased by at least 10 percent since the duties were imposed and EFA members have spent US$1.18 billion paying anti-dumping taxes over the past three and a half years.


EU member states will vote for the extension at a meeting in Mid November and make a final decision on January 3, 2010.


Source: VOV






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Vietnam sets higher taxable prices for imported cars

In Vietnam Economy on October 13, 2009 at 3:03 am




Vietnam sets higher taxable prices for imported cars


QĐND – Sunday, October 11, 2009, 20:35 (GMT+7)

The General Customs Department has set higher minimum taxable prices for more than 600 imported car models, following allegations that local importers have used under-invoicing to evade taxes.


Taxable prices for all imported cars, both new and used, will be between 3 and 20 percent higher, which can translate to an increase of thousands of US dollars, local newswire VnExpress reported Friday.


An Acura MDX imported from Canada, for instance, was priced at US$33,000 at Vietnamese ports, but now customs will tax the vehicles on a price of no less than $37,000, even if the actual price is lower, the newswire said.


Fair but expensive


A car importer in Ho Chi Minh City told VnExpress that the move would make competition more fair among businesses, but he said it would also drive retail prices up.


“In the end, it is still consumers who will be hurt,” he said, warning that incorrect pricing could violate regulations set by the World Trade Organization.


The decision to raise minimum prices for imported cars came after Vietnam’s carmakers said under-invoicing and other unfair competitive practices by auto importers were hurting them as well as the state exchequer.


The Vietnam Automobile Manufacturers’ Association has informed the Finance Ministry that some importers intentionally make invoice prices much lower than actual selling prices to reduce their tax obligations.


However, many car importers said they declared car prices based on their contracts with foreign sellers and thus it is not so easy to evade tax by under-invoicing as claimed by the automobile association.


They said the new price list was made in favor of the Vietnam Automobile Manufacturers’ Association. 


But VnExpress cited an official at the General Customs Department as saying that the decision was not a response to what the car association has said. It was necessary to update the price list regularly, he said.

Source: TN

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Vietnam sets higher taxable prices for imported cars

In Vietnam Economy on October 11, 2009 at 1:44 pm




Vietnam sets higher taxable prices for imported cars


QĐND – Sunday, October 11, 2009, 20:35 (GMT+7)

The General Customs Department has set higher minimum taxable prices for more than 600 imported car models, following allegations that local importers have used under-invoicing to evade taxes.


Taxable prices for all imported cars, both new and used, will be between 3 and 20 percent higher, which can translate to an increase of thousands of US dollars, local newswire VnExpress reported Friday.


An Acura MDX imported from Canada, for instance, was priced at US$33,000 at Vietnamese ports, but now customs will tax the vehicles on a price of no less than $37,000, even if the actual price is lower, the newswire said.


Fair but expensive


A car importer in Ho Chi Minh City told VnExpress that the move would make competition more fair among businesses, but he said it would also drive retail prices up.


“In the end, it is still consumers who will be hurt,” he said, warning that incorrect pricing could violate regulations set by the World Trade Organization.


The decision to raise minimum prices for imported cars came after Vietnam’s carmakers said under-invoicing and other unfair competitive practices by auto importers were hurting them as well as the state exchequer.


The Vietnam Automobile Manufacturers’ Association has informed the Finance Ministry that some importers intentionally make invoice prices much lower than actual selling prices to reduce their tax obligations.


However, many car importers said they declared car prices based on their contracts with foreign sellers and thus it is not so easy to evade tax by under-invoicing as claimed by the automobile association.


They said the new price list was made in favor of the Vietnam Automobile Manufacturers’ Association. 


But VnExpress cited an official at the General Customs Department as saying that the decision was not a response to what the car association has said. It was necessary to update the price list regularly, he said.

Source: TN

Source: QDND

Health Ministry orders stricter control of imported foodstuffs

In Uncategorized on November 6, 2008 at 12:38 pm

Hanoi (VNA) – The Ministry of Health will destroy all eggs imported from China found to contain melamine, said Deputy Minister Cao Minh Quang at an urgent meeting on Oct. 28.

The meeting was co-hosted by the MoH and the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) in response to information from Hong Kong authorities, saying that they had found chicken eggs imported from China contaminated with melamine.

MARD is working with other ministries and agencies to check the information, however, the ministry has increased inspection and control of imported products, particularly those transported into Vietnam via border gates, to avoid products containing melamine entering the country, according to Deputy Minister Luong Le Phuong.

The health ministry would work to more strictly control foods imported from China , including eggs, said Nguyen Cong Khan, head of the ministry’s food hygiene and safety department.

According to Hong Kong health and food authorities, eggs may contain melamine as a result of poultry eating cattle feed contaminated with melamine.

“The health ministry will not allow the sale of any products that contain melamine, or other harmful substances,” said Deputy Minister Cao Minh Quang.

The health ministry would co-operate with other ministries, including the ministries of Industry and Trade, Science and Technology and MARD to strengthen quality checks of imported food products, he said.

Products with unclear origins, such as illegal imported eggs, would not be permitted to be sold, he added.

High-risk food products must be certificated not to contain melamine before being imported into Vietnam , according to Quang.

Health inspectors have discovered cattle feed, used as poultry feed by some farms, contains melamine and decided to zone off the region and destroy all tainted products, Quang said, adding that the cattle feed was imported from China .

Chickens that eat food containing melamine are likely to be affected by the substance and may lay melamine contaminated eggs, so the production and trade of cattle feed should also be put under strict control, he said.

MARD has worked with the health ministry and customs forces on this issue, Deputy Minister Phuong said.

Further tests are needed to check whether the information is correct, so consumers should not worry, according to him.

However, the majority of eggs were illegally imported from China into Vietnam , causing difficulties for authorities to control it, said Khan.

Authorised agencies in northern Lang Son province have so far this year seized and destroyed more than 267,000 chicken eggs illegally imported from China .

“If Chinese chicken eggs are sold, it is difficult to distinguish them from Vietnamese eggs. They look completely the same,” said head of the Lang Son veterinary department Do Van Duoc.

The department plans to work with health agencies to send samples from Chinese eggs taken from border markets to the Veterinary Department and the health ministry for testing to see whether the eggs contain melamine or not, according to Duoc.-

Dung Quat refinery to use imported crude oil

In Uncategorized on October 8, 2008 at 1:27 pm

The Vietnam Oil and Gas Group (PVN) is negotiating with BP of Britain and Shell of the US to import crude oil for the Dung Quat refinery, which is scheduled to start operation in February next year.

PVN said it plans to import oil to meet 30 percent of Dung Quat’s crude demand estimated at 3.5 million tonnes at its initial phase and around 6.5 million tonnes in 2010.

It was intended the nation’s first oil refinery would use crude oil from the Bach Ho field but as oil from the field is fetching the highest price in the market, the import of crude to replace part of this supply will be more enconomically beneficial.

The Oil Corporation (PV Oil) will undertake the sales of all product of the Dung Quat refinery during the refinery’s test running period.

PVN said that it is considering several possibilities regarding the Dung Quat refinery, which either see it operating as an independent business or being sold to a foreign partner.-

Health Ministry tightens up on imported milk supplies

In Uncategorized on September 24, 2008 at 11:11 am

HCM CITY — The Ministry of Health (MoH) has ordered authorities nationwide to ban entry to any imports of milk, milk powder or milk-based products that have non-standard labels or do not contain information about supply sources.


Recent tests by the city have shown that the Chinese brand Yili Pure Milk, which was imported last month and sold by Kim An Ltd. Co., is contaminated with melamine, an industrial chemical used to make plastics and fertiliser.


Melamine, which is banned from use in food in China, was illegally added by a number of Chinese dairy companies to artificially raise the protein levels in milk, according to news reports.


At least 13,000 Chinese children who drank contaminated milk or milk formula have been hospitalised, with most being treated for kidney stones. The Chinese Health Ministry said 104 of them were in serious condition, the International Herald Tribune reported on Tuesday.


The Yili milk sample was tested at the HCM City Experiment Analysis Service Center on Monday.


Nguyen Van Chau, director of HCM City’s Health Department, has asked the HCM City Customs Department to supply a list of imported milk brands to hasten the inspection work now being done.


Chau also asked the MoH to re-check its list of all officially imported milk brands that had been issued food safety certificates.


The MoH said the 22 Chinese banned milk brands are: Yili, Sanlu, Xiongmao, Shengyuan, Shanxi Gucheng, Bao Ji Hui min, Meng Niu, Jia Duo Tianjin, Guangdong Yashili, Jiang xi Guang ming ying xiong, Hunan Pei yi, Qining, Shanxi Yashili, Jin Bi Min, Shi Yi, Jin dinh, Aomeiduo, Soukang, Baiyue, Leilei, Baoanli and Chenguan. —