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Posts Tagged ‘leaves’

Japan knife rampage on buses leaves 13 wounded

In Uncategorized on December 17, 2010 at 8:57 am

TOKYO (AFP) – A Japanese man with a knife went on a rampage on two packed buses Friday and wounded 13 people, mostly teenage school children, by slashing and beating them and sparking a panicked stampede.


Police said they had arrested 27-year-old unemployed Yuta Saito after the attacks during the morning rush hour outside Toride railway station, about 40 kilometres (25 miles) northeast of Tokyo.

(AFP) Policemen inspect buses after a Japanese man with a knife went on a rampage on two packed buses Friday

“The suspect got onto the buses and wielded a knife and slashed passengers,” said a local police spokesman after the bloody attack with what media reports said was a 25-centimetre (10-inch) kitchen knife.


Passengers subdued the attacker, who also sustained some injuries.


“I wanted to end my life,” he was later quoted as saying by broadcaster NHK.


The knife attack in Japan, where violent crime is rare, evoked memories of a far bloodier stabbing spree in 2008 when a man killed seven people in Tokyo, running over three with a truck and stabbing four to death.


Friday morning’s attacks left 13 people wounded, none with life-threatening injuries. Among the victims were seven girls and four boys from junior high and high schools and two women aged 49 and 59, reports said.


The man slashed at least five passengers, a local fire department official said. He punched others and triggered a panicked flight from the buses that left the remaining victims injured.


“People screamed: ‘Run. A man with a knife is getting in’. I was scared, so scared,” said one woman, speaking on television.


Another woman said: “There was an uproar. High school students were running out, and I saw a schoolboy bleeding from his forehead.”


The driver of the first bus that was attacked told NHK: “There were some 50 passengers on the bus when the man entered.


“First, I thought it was a fight among students. But then I heard a scream and I thought this isn’t normal. I saw the man wielding a knife, and I quickly opened the door to let the students flee. That’s all I could do.”


The attacks stunned the local community in Ibaraki prefecture.


“It’s an unforgivable act,” said Kenji Takezawa, deputy principal of Edogawa Gakuen school, some of whose students were among the victims.


“We gathered our students in our hall and told them to stay calm,” he said, adding that all afternoon classes were cancelled.


The National Police Agency said this week that the number of criminal cases detected by police in 2010 looks set to total below 1.6 million for the first time in 23 years, Kyodo News reported.


Murders, attempted murders and conspiracy to murder are on track to hit a new post-war low this year, with 988 cases reported by the end of November, down 2.8 percent from last year, the report said.

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Source: SGGP

Flood leaves two dead in Khanh Hoa

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 9:29 am

Flooding killed two people in the south central province of Khanh Hoa on Monday.

Flooding inundates several streets in Nha Trang City (Photo: SGGP)

The South Central Regional Hydro Meteorological Center said that the flooding was triggered by heavy rain combined with the release of floodwater from the reservoirs on the previous day.


Several areas in Nha Trang City and Dien Khanh District were badly submerged with many portions under 1.5 meters of water.


According to the Khanh Hoa Province Flood and Storm Prevention Center, all irrigation reservoirs in the area are reducing the release of water. The reservoirs are too full. So if it continues raining heavily, they will be forced to discharge more floodwater.


The same day, the train-track through Suoi Cat Community, was repaired, allowing thousand of passengers that were stranded on the trains, to travel through at only 5 kilometers an hour.

Source: SGGP

Cambodia festival stampede leaves nearly 380 dead

In Uncategorized on November 24, 2010 at 4:50 am

PHNOM PENH, Nov 23, 2010 (AFP) – Frantic relatives scoured makeshift morgues in the Cambodian capital on Tuesday after nearly 380 revellers perished in a huge stampede on an overcrowded bridge, turning a water festival into tragedy.


Survivors recounted scenes of panic and fear on the narrow bridge as people were trampled underfoot by the surging crowds on Monday, with some reportedly falling or jumping into the river below or grabbing on to electricity cables.

Cambodian Buddhist monks gather to pray for victims of the stampede in front of the bridge in Phnom Penh on November 23, 2010. AFP

Prime Minister Hun Sen described the disaster as Cambodia’s worst tragedy since the Khmer Rouge’s 1975-1979 reign of terror, which left up to a quarter of the population dead. He declared a national day of mourning on Thursday.


The United States offered Cambodia “deep condolences for the tragic loss of life”.


At least 378 people were killed in the crush and some 750 were injured, government spokesman Phay Siphan told AFP.


“The number is still going up,” he said.


Exuberant festival-goers had been crossing the bridge to reach an island hosting concerts, food stalls and ice sculptures before the crowd turned to a desperate crush of human bodies.


It was not immediately clear what had triggered the disaster, but another government spokesman said a rumour had spread among revellers celebrating one of Cambodia’s biggest festivals that the bridge was unstable.


“So panic started. It was too crowded and they had nowhere to run,” Khieu Kanharith said.


Many of the deaths were caused by suffocation and internal injuries, he said, adding that about two-thirds of the dead were women.


At the scene of the tragedy, the bridge to Diamond Island was littered with sunglasses and flip-flops and still decked with lights from the huge annual water festival that drew millions into the streets on Monday night.


“There were so many people and they tried to push me and some people stepped on me. I saw a few jump off the bridge,” Meourn Piseth told AFP.


“I felt like I was going to die, I couldn’t breathe,” said the 15-year-old as he received treatment for his badly bruised legs at Preah Ketomealea hospital.


At the site of the tragedy around 400 Buddhist monks, nuns and government officials laid flowers and lit incense sticks while praying for the souls of the dead.


“They didn’t expect to die here… We feel so miserable,” Cambodia’s chief monk Non Ngeth told AFP.


At the city’s Calmette Hospital a man suffering serious back injuries, who did not want to give his name, recalled the anguish of being unable to help others around him as the surging crowd became a suffocating crush.


“I felt selfish when it happened, but I could not help myself. There was a child trapped under me and I wanted to pull him up but I couldn’t,” he said.


Early Tuesday several hundred worried relatives gathered outside the hospital clutching pictures of family members, trying to identify missing loved ones.


The dead, laid out in rows under a white tent erected in the hospital car park, were photographed and numbered by policemen, their uncovered faces showing that many had sustained bloody bruises during the stampede.


One woman said she recognised her 16-year-old niece in the makeshift morgue.


“I heard she was killed last night, so I came here and I saw her body,” Som Khov, 51, told AFP.


After Hun Sen promised that the bodies of out-of-town visitors would be sent home, 13 military trucks began taking away corpses and by evening most of the dead had been removed from the hospital’s makeshift morgue.


The stampede marked a tragic end to the three days of boat races, concerts and fireworks. The annual festival marks the reversal of the flow between the Tonle Sap and Mekong rivers.


The event — which saw hundreds of brightly coloured boats take part in races on the Tonle Sap — is popular with tourists but there was no confirmation that any foreigners were among the victims.


The last time the festival was marred by tragedy was in 2007 when five Singaporeans were killed after their dragon boat, carrying 22 men, capsized at the end of their race.

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Source: SGGP

Cambodia festival stampede leaves almost 350 dead

In Uncategorized on November 23, 2010 at 2:02 am

Fire leaves 4,500 stranded on cruise ship in Pacific

In Uncategorized on November 10, 2010 at 4:51 am

HR management still leaves room for improvement

In Uncategorized on November 8, 2010 at 4:05 pm

Tornado leaves 70 homes toppled and roofless in Ca Mau

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 6:36 pm

Tornado with strong winds, heavy rains and high ocean tides caused much of damage for people in the southern end province of Ca Mau August 14.

Army forces help residents repair and rebuild houses after a tornado lashes Ngoc Hien and Tran Van Thoi districts, Ca Mau Province August 14 (Photo: SGGP)

According to the province Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, the tornado destroyed 23 homes and blew 46 others’ roofs away while another was trucked by lightning in two coastal districts of Ngoc Hien and Tran Van Thoi.


Meanwhile, giant waves sank Nguyen Van Xe’s fishing boat together with seven fishermen into the sea, destinies of these unlucky men have yet known. Elsewhere the border army forces saved 13 other fishermen who fell into the sea during the fierce tornado.


High ocean tides severely engulfed and sent parts of 1,500 meters of the sea dyke tumble in the westward Ca Mau Province.


The same day afternoon, a two-hour downpour inundated streets under 0.2-0.5 meters of floodwaters, causing the worst traffic jam in many years for Cach Mang Thang Tam Street in Can Tho City.


Thousands of motorcycles lined up along one kilometer of the street. The downgraded drainage system together with narrow alleys along the street’s sides has been blamed for worsening the flooding.


In the Central Highlands, a tornado raged through Xuan Tho Commune in Da Lat City August 13, leaving about one billion dong in loss.


The one hour tornado, which swept through the commune’s Xuan Thanh Village, uprooted over 500 pines and crushed a truck.


It also crumpled 700 square meters of glasshouses and ravaged much of farming area. Local residents reported that was the worst ever tornado in the area.

Source: SGGP

Tornado leaves 70 homes toppled and roofless in Ca Mau

In Uncategorized on August 15, 2010 at 11:24 am

Tornado with strong winds, heavy rains and high ocean tides caused much of damage for people in the southern end province of Ca Mau August 14.

Army forces help residents repair and rebuild houses after a tornado lashes Ngoc Hien and Tran Van Thoi districts, Ca Mau Province August 14 (Photo: SGGP)

According to the province Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, the tornado destroyed 23 homes and blew 46 others’ roofs away while another was trucked by lightning in two coastal districts of Ngoc Hien and Tran Van Thoi.


Meanwhile, giant waves sank Nguyen Van Xe’s fishing boat together with seven fishermen into the sea, destinies of these unlucky men have yet known. Elsewhere the border army forces saved 13 other fishermen who fell into the sea during the fierce tornado.


High ocean tides severely engulfed and sent parts of 1,500 meters of the sea dyke tumble in the westward Ca Mau Province.


The same day afternoon, a two-hour downpour inundated streets under 0.2-0.5 meters of floodwaters, causing the worst traffic jam in many years for Cach Mang Thang Tam Street in Can Tho City.


Thousands of motorcycles lined up along one kilometer of the street. The downgraded drainage system together with narrow alleys along the street’s sides has been blamed for worsening the flooding.


In the Central Highlands, a tornado raged through Xuan Tho Commune in Da Lat City August 13, leaving about one billion dong in loss.


The one hour tornado, which swept through the commune’s Xuan Thanh Village, uprooted over 500 pines and crushed a truck.


It also crumpled 700 square meters of glasshouses and ravaged much of farming area. Local residents reported that was the worst ever tornado in the area.

Source: SGGP

100 days in, Gulf spill leaves ugly questions unanswered

In Uncategorized on July 29, 2010 at 7:18 am

WASHINGTON, July 28, 2010 (AFP) – The Gulf of Mexico oil disaster reached the 100-day mark Wednesday with hopes high that BP is finally on the verge of permanently sealing its ruptured Macondo well.


But years of legal wrangles and probes lie ahead and myriad questions remain about the long-term effects of the massive oil spill on wildlife, the environment and the livelihoods of Gulf residents.

Ships assist in clean up and containment near the source of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill July 27, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana.AFP

If BP needs a reminder of the long legal road ahead as it tries to rebuild its reputation, one will be provided on Thursday as lawyers at a session in Boise, Idaho set the stage for a potential trial of the century.


Proceedings will examine whether complaints from around 200 plaintiffs can be consolidated and give trial lawyers a test run of the arguments they will make during what could be years of legal action.


US officials were anxious to avoid being too optimistic ahead of next week’s crucial operations and cautioned that a mountain of work lay ahead to clean up oiled shorelines and pick up some 20 million feet (3,800 miles) of boom.


“I would characterize this as the first 100 days. There’s a lot of work in front of us,” said Rear Admiral Paul Zukunft, the on-scene coordinator. “We are not out of the woods yet, we still need a permanent kill.”


BP aims to start the “static kill” on Monday, pumping heavy drilling mud and cement down through the cap at the top of the well that has sealed it for the past two weeks.


Five days later a relief well should intercept the damaged well, allowing engineers to check the success of the “static kill” and cement in the area between the drill pipe and the well bore.


This so-called “bottom kill” should finally plug the reservoir once and for all, but it will not answer how the catastrophe was allowed to occur and who is responsible.


While the last surface patches of toxic crude biodegrade rapidly in the warm waters of the Gulf, the long-term impact of what is thought to be the biggest accidental oil spill ever may not be realized for decades.


As the focus shifts to the clean-up in the marshes and beaches of the Gulf coast, so it does to the US Justice Department investigation and state probes in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama.


The Washington Post reported Wednesday that a team has been established to examine whether the notoriously close ties between BP and federal regulators contributed to the April 20 disaster.


The “BP squad” will also probe rig operator Transocean and Halliburton, the oil services company which had finished cementing the well only 20 hours before the rig exploded, the Post reported.


BP announced Tuesday it would replace gaffe-prone British chief executive Tony Hayward with Bob Dudley, an American, in a bid to repair its tattered US reputation.


It also posted a quarterly loss of 16.9 billion dollars and set aside 32.2 billion dollars to pay spill costs, including a 20 billion dollar fund to pay compensation to the battered fishing, oil, and tourism industries.


Once the well is sealed, US spill chief Thad Allen plans to shift resources to focus on picking up boom, cleaning oiled shores and testing for any hidden underwater plumes.


To that end he has called a meeting on Thursday morning with parish presidents to discuss the redeployment of the army of local conscripts.


Sophisticated underwater operations involving fleets of robotic submarines at brain-crunching depths will make way for the less glamorous but equally complex work of Shoreline Clean-up Assessment Teams, SCATs for short.


They will sign off mile-by-mile on the 638 miles (1,027 kilometers) of Gulf Coast where oil has washed ashore.


The beaches should be relatively painless to mop up, but cleaning up the maze of marshes, where there is nothing to stand on and shallow-bottomed boats are needed to navigate the narrow channels, is a logistical nightmare.


Geologist Ed Owens, a world authority on protecting shorelines from oil spills contracted to BP, told AFP on Monday that the marshes should recover in months and the impact of the oil was “quite small.”


But other leading scientists have warned of a decades-long effect on marine life that could lead to a shift in the overall biological network in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Source: SGGP

Accident leaves four dead in central province

In Uncategorized on June 18, 2010 at 12:19 pm

A head-on truck-car collision in central Vietnam left four dead and five injured on National Highway 1A June 17th.

A truck that collided with a car in central Vietnam June 17, leaving four dead and five injured. (Photo:Vietnamnet)

A refrigeration truck was driving south when it collided with a car carrying a delegation athletes at Pho Ninh Commune highway marker kilometer 1090 in Duc Pho District, Quang Ngai Province.


The delegation from the central coastal Phu Yen Province was on its way to the National Sports Festival in the Quang Nam Province.


The dead included So Thi Tham,18; Nguyen Quang Phong, 26; Minh Thi Thuy Trang, 26 and the car’s driver Pham Van Ha.


Representatives from the Phu Yen Province Department of Culture, Sports and Tourism, the provincial Military Headquarters, and victims’ relatives are on the way to Quang Ngai Province to retrieve the bodies.


On the same day, the Quang Ngai Traffic Safety Board visited the injured at a local hospital, and they supported each family of the deceased with VND2 million and VND1 million for each injured person.


Police are investing the cause of the accident.


On the same day, the driver of the 45-seat passenger car carrying 32 from Ho Chi Minh City to Nha Trang in central coastal province of Khanh Hoa lost control of the vehicle and crashed into an irrigation canal.


The car was seriously damaged, but fortunately, the accident did not leave anyone injured.


Investigators said the accident happened when the passenger car tried to evade a motorbike driving at a high speed on the wrong side of the road.

Source: SGGP