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Posts Tagged ‘need’

Charity gala event to help aid children in need

In Uncategorized on January 12, 2011 at 7:06 am




Charity gala event to help aid children in need


QĐND – Tuesday, January 11, 2011, 21:34 (GMT+7)

Leading artists will gather to perform at a charity gala on Jan. 13 to raise money for children living at Hanoi’s Phuc Lam Preschool and Nursery.


The show, which is to take place at the capital’s historic Sofitel Legend Metropole Hanoi hotel, is entitled Cay Lieu Khoc Cho Em (Willow Weeps for Me).


As a curtain raiser, Spanish fashion designer Chula will present her latest collection, which features the diamond jewellery of the Hanoi-based London Diamond Gallery.


Vietnamese diva My Linh and virtuoso pianist Pho An My will share the stage with the hotel’s resident French jazz diva Trebeka on the night. Award-winning actress Le Khanh will be MC.


The event is organised by the the non-profit charity organisation, Willow Weeps for Me, founded by Trebeka.


Source: VNA


Source: QDND

Need for climate-change data

In Uncategorized on January 8, 2011 at 4:09 am




Need for climate-change data


QĐND – Thursday, December 30, 2010, 20:37 (GMT+7)

HCM City needs to create a legal approach so that it can successfully develop programmes to cope with climate change, experts have said.


The city still lacks legal criteria for evaluating or determining what industries or areas will be most seriously hit by climate change, according to Nguyen Trung Viet of the Steering Committee of Climate Change.


The city also lacks a comprehensive database about industries or areas that could be most seriously affected.


Viet noted that programmes to cope with climate change can not be developed successfully without such a database.


Experts say general residential areas with insufficient infrastructure, such as District 12 as well as Can Gio, Hoc Mon and Binh Chanh districts, willbe hit hard by climate change.


Many industrial zones in lowland areas, especially industrial clusters in the city, will also be hit hard by climate change.


If the sea level rises one metre, about 500 factories, which account for nine percent of total factories in the city, and 16 industrial zones will be submerged under water, experts have warned.


Agricultural areas will be most seriously hit by climate change, according to the city’s Department of Natural Resources and Environment.


The city has urbanised only 30 percent of its total area. Of 24 districts, 10 districts are located in agricultural areas where farmers grow vegetables for sale to city residents.


According to the Steering Committee, the city will need to spend at least 20 trillion VND (1 billion USD) to cope with climate change from now until 2015.


The amount willbe spent mostly on research on how to effectively deal with global warming, Viet said.


Funds to develop programmes to cope with climate change willbe sourced from support or loans from international organisations (50 percent), State budget (30 percent), local budget (10 percent) and businesses (10 percent).


Under a Netherlands-backed programme, the city will be given 6 million EUR (8.2 million USD) to develop climate-change initiatives that willfocus on water resources, seaports, and floating cities for residents.


Source: VNA


Source: QDND

Bear conservation: opinions need changing

In Uncategorized on November 24, 2010 at 1:51 pm




Bear conservation: opinions need changing


QĐND – Wednesday, November 24, 2010, 20:31 (GMT+7)

To save the Vietnamese bear population, the country should start a campaign to change people’s ideas about the properties of bear gall bladder and bile products.


This recommendation was put forward by Education for Nature Vietnam (ENV) at a press conference in Hanoi on November 23 to launch a report on attitudes and behaviour regarding the use of bear gall in Vietnam.


An ENV survey of more than 3,000 residents of three major cities – Hanoi, HCM City and Da Nang – shows that 22 percent of people interviewed said they have used bear gall. People with higher levels of education tend to use more bear gall than those with lower levels of education.


Many people consider bear gall a panacea for all diseases ranging from minor injuries and digestive problems to cancer. Up to 74 percent of interviewees said that using bear gall is not unlawful behaviour.


According to ENV, Vietnam is home to two rare species of bears, Ursus thibetanus and Helarctos malayanus, and both are seriously threatened by illegal hunting and smuggling. Bears are usually captured in the wild when they are small and then sold to farms to raise for gall bladder and bile products.


At present, Vietnam has around 3,500 confined bears, most of them originating from the wild.


ENV said that eliminating bear farms is the first important step for conserving bear species in Vietnam.


In addition to protecting wild bears, ENV recommended that relevant Vietnamese agencies should improve the laws on wild animal protection and promote their enforcement as well as scientific research on bear conservation.


Source: VOV


Source: QDND

Tra and basa fish need branding

In Uncategorized on October 27, 2010 at 2:40 pm




Tra and basa fish need branding


QĐND – Wednesday, October 27, 2010, 20:39 (GMT+7)

Seafood exporting and processing businesses and agro-forestry-aquatic product quality centres in localities need to have specific commercial brands for tra and basa fish when exporting overseas from December 31.


This decision was recently announced by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.


Under the decision, businesses should choose authentic names for tra and basa fish when exporting their products.


They should work with importers to name their products for each country and get licensed to export their products to these markets as required.


Source: VOV


Source: QDND

Five million disabled need more training

In Uncategorized on October 27, 2010 at 5:36 am




Five million disabled need more training


QĐND – Tuesday, October 26, 2010, 21:10 (GMT+7)

More mechanisms should be created to help Vietnam’s 5 million disabled people access job training to make sure they fully benefit from the new Law on People with Disabilities.

Disabled people make up 6.34 percent of Vietnam’s population.

The Ministry of Labour, War Invalids and Social Affairs has asked ministries, organisations and individuals to make contributions to the draft decree, which is used to fine tune the law.

Nguyen Xuan Lap, deputy director of the ministry’s General Department of Social Protection, said those drafting the decree would clarify support policies for the disabled and enterprises that employ them.

According to the ministry, about 2.5 percent of the disabled has access to job training classes, but only 16,000 have permanent jobs.

Dang Van Thanh, vice-chairman of the Vietnam Association of Business and Enterprises for Persons with Disabilities, said the decree should refer to particular support available during training courses.

He said it should also raise the monthly support for disabled apprentices, which has remained at 540,000 VND since 2005.

Thanh said it is also necessary to create clear procedures to enable enterprises that employ handicapped people or are owned by handicapped people to access preferential loans and learn how to reduce tax or make themselves tax exempt.

According to Government decree ND81/CP passed in 1995, the number of disabled employees in larger enterprise should amount to 2-3 percent of total employees. If not, they are compelled to pay money to fund to create jobs for the disabled run by the local Labour, War Invalids and Social Affairs departments. However, at present, the fund is accessible in only about 10 cities and provinces.

Thanh said measures are needed to speed up the establishment and operation of the fund throughout the whole country.

“The most important thing now is enforcement of the new law,” said Nguyen Thao Van, human resources manager of the Hanoi-based Nghi Luc Song Training Centre. She herself is also disabled.

Van said that although the State regulates support for the disabled during their apprenticeships, most apprentices receive no support, so they and their families have to manage by themselves.

She also recommended opening more training classes for the disabled. “The graduation certificates, granted at secondary school, do help them access better jobs besides the occupation certificate they earn at the centre,” Van said.

Since 2008, the centre has trained about 700 disabled people about computing and English, 30 percent of them found jobs with monthly payment of 3-4 million VND (150-200 USD).

She said this proves the effectiveness of the centre’s training model as well as the disabled’s ability to meet higher work requirements and not just be hired to do manual work, such as handicrafts.

The draft decree consists of four chapters covering regulations on the types of disabilities, levels of disabilities – and support in education, work and social welfare.

The draft proposes increasing monthly support for handicapped children and elders unable to look after themselves from 180,000 VND to 450,000 VND (10-23 USD). Those who take care of them will be given 270,000 VND (13 USD).

The Law on People with Disabilities was approved in June and will take effect next year. It replaces another law framed in 1998.


Source: VNA/ Photo: QDND


Source: QDND

Businesses need to grasp trade remedy measures

In Uncategorized on August 3, 2010 at 3:25 pm




Businesses need to grasp trade remedy measures


QĐND – Tuesday, August 03, 2010, 21:12 (GMT+7)


To protect their legitimate interests, businesses are entitled to ask for investigation and trade remedy measures (TRms) to combat unhealthy competition in imports and request the WTO to deal with lawsuits that can seriously damage them.

Businesses remain “vague”


“Vietnam has not yet used trade remedy measures (TRms) to protect its domestic industries although it has the necessary tools at its disposal,” said Vu Ba Phu, Deputy Head of the Competition Management Department.


According to the Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI), only 66 percent of Vietnamese businesses understand the basic content of all WTO agreements and less than 35 percent grasp Vietnam’s WTO commitments that are related to their sectors or business areas.


“This is the weak point of many Vietnamese associations and businesses when applying TRms. They only focus on exports and miss out on the domestic market,” said Tran Huu Huynh, Head of the VCCI’s Legal Department.


Even worse, through a recent seminar on using TRms to protect businesses from a glut of imported goods, did a representative from the Vietnam Construction Association learn about dumping and subsidies. But, in his words, how to apply TRms is another matter.
Apart from coping with anti-dumping and anti-subsidy and TRms lawsuits issued by other countries, Vietnamese businesses have to face with tough competitions from imported goods in the domestic market.


Mr Phu said that TRms are used legally by WTO member countries. Consequently, the application of these measures by member countries must be subject to WTO agreements on anti-dumping, anti- subsidy measures and TRms.


Deputy Minister of Trade Le Danh Vinh underlined the need to provide a comprehensive account of TRms for Vietnamese businesses.


To protect their legitimate interests and ensure the survival and development of businesses in the domestic market when facing unhealthy competition from imported goods, Vietnamese businesses are entitled to ask State management agencies to investigate and apply TRms against imported goods, said Mr Vinh.


Applying TRms on home turf


According to the Ministry of Industry and Trade, over the past seventh months, Vietnam’s import surplus has hit US$7.44 billion, accounting for 19.45 percent of its export turnover. This figure underlines the competitive pressure of imported products and services on domestic production and services.


The Competition Management Department said while attempting to penetrate the Vietnamese market, foreign businesses take account of unhealthy competitive practices including dumping, subsidies or taking advantage of opportunities to flood the Vietnamese market with imported goods. This can cause losses for Vietnamese businesses on their home turf. Therefore, businesses and associations need to be more active when applying legal measures under WTO regulations to raise their competitive capacity in the domestic market.


In the middle of last year, the Viglacera Float Glass Company (VIFG) and the Vietnam Float Glass Company (VFG) officially asked the Ministry of Industry and Trade to investigate the application of TRms against float glass products imported to Vietnam. The investigation was of great importance to the country’s international trade activities as this was the first time domestic businesses had requested State management agencies to protect their interests under the WTO’s rules. This was also the first time, since joining the world’s largest trade organisation that Vietnam had officially conducted an investigation and considered applying TRms in its capacity as an importing country.


Mr Phu said that the investigation helped to reduce the imports of this product which enabled domestic float glass producers to increase their sales volume and restore production.


Being more active in the global market


Since 1994, Vietnam has faced 42 trade disputes, including 35 anti-dumping lawsuits, 10 of which have been imposed by the EU, 6 by India and 5 by the US.


Not only leather capped shoes and bicycles but also plastic bags were faced with anti-dumping taxes in 2009. The lawsuit is likely to be a precedent for other anti-subsidy lawsuits against Vietnam’s major exports to the US and other countries.


Some foreign experts warned that in 2010 wooden products, garments, and steel are likely to face anti-dumping lawsuits in the US and EU. Other products, such as chemicals, mechanic products and plastics may also be investigated.


According to the VCCI’s survey, 66 percent of businesses do not grasp the basic content of WTO agreements and more than half of businesses are not aware of Vietnam’s commitments relating to their products. However, if they learn about the legislation they can lodge a petition with the WTO to deal with disputes. This world body will then consider whether Vietnamese companies are charged with dumping prices or not and give a final decision.


Both domestic and foreign lawyers said that international trade disputes are inevitable so businesses associations should prepare and come up with long-term measures and use international trade law to deal with them.


Experts said that when anti-dumping taxes are invalid, they might be extended, so businesses will be faced with such taxes forever.


For example, Vietnamese footwear products will continue to face an anti-dumping tax of 10 percent in 15 months since January 2010 and probably the EU Footwear Federation will have to ask the EC to extend the deadline.


Dealing with trade disputes under the WTO framework is common and businesses should not consider it a complicated process.


The WTO has an agency to deal with trade disputes. Having become its members for three years, Vietnam has the responsibility and the right to ask the WTO to consider any unjust lawsuit against Vietnamese businesses.


In the first quarter of this year, Vietnam already lodged with the WTO strong protest against the US imposition of anti-dumping taxes on its frozen shrimp. The economic community is optimistic about the possibility of winning the case. After five years of paying these taxes, Vietnam has suffered a lot of losses. If the tax continues to be imposed for the next five years, the US will not be a lucrative market for Vietnamese frozen shrimp.

Source: VOV

Source: QDND

Vietnamese medical herbs need more oversight

In Uncategorized on July 15, 2010 at 1:06 pm

Vietnam imports over 85 percent of its medicinal ingredients and herbs to produce medicines; despite the country being home to various kinds of medicinal plants, reports Drug Administration of Vietnam.

A farmer in Long Khanh, the southern province of Dong Nai, harvests Linhchi mushroom

“Vietnam currently has 3,800 medicinal plants that can produce medicines, with the World Health Organization confirming that the country is home to 200 precious medicinal herbs,” said Health Deputy Minister Cao Minh Quang.


The country annually produces some 3,000-5,000 tons of medicinal materials.


However, Quang said, the exploitation, production and trade of the medicinal materials had yet to take advantage of domestic resources.


According to health ministry statistics, there are over 300 units producing medicines from domestic materials, but only 10 of them meet the WHO’s Good Manufacturing


Practices – part of a system covering the manufacture and testing of active pharmaceutical ingredients, diagnostics, pharmaceutical products and medical devices.


He added over-exploitation had caused the loss of some domestic materials that had been unique to Vietnam.


For example, the vang dang plant (coscinium fenestratum) was widely found in central Binh Phuoc province’s Phuoc Long district a few years ago but now could hardly be seen after being over harvested.


Medicinal herbs in Vietnam were mainly grown, processed and traded by private businesses, making it difficult to meet standards, Quang said.


The administration also warned about quality of the medicinal materials when most of the materials were illegally imported.


Domestic pharmaceutical producers wanted to reduce production costs by purchasing domestic medicinal materials but faced insufficient supply, said Nguyen Tien Hung, general director of Medical Products Import Export Joint Stocks Company.


He said it was necessary to offer incentives for growing, processing and using medical herbs. Relevant authorities needed to improve their management of medicinal plant growing and trading.

Source: SGGP

Vietnamese medical herbs need more oversight

In Uncategorized on July 15, 2010 at 9:00 am




Vietnamese medical herbs need more oversight


QĐND – Tuesday, July 13, 2010, 21:0 (GMT+7)

Vietnam imports over 85 percent of its medicinal ingredients and herbs to produce medicines; despite the country being home to various kinds of medicinal plants, reports Drug Administration of Vietnam.


“Vietnam currently has 3,800 medicinal plants that can produce medicines, with the World Health Organisation confirming that the country is home to 200 precious medicinal herbs,” said Health Deputy Minister Cao Minh Quang.


The country annually produces some 3,000-5,000 tonnes of medicinal materials.


However, Quang said, the exploitation, production and trade of the medicinal materials had yet to take advantage of domestic resources.


According to health ministry statistics, there are over 300 units producing medicines from domestic materials, but only 10 of them meet the WHO’s Good Manufacturing


Practices – part of a system covering the manufacture and testing of active pharmaceutical ingredients, diagnostics, pharmaceutical products and medical devices.


He added over-exploitation had caused the loss of some domestic materials that had been unique to Vietnam.


For example, the vang dang plant (coscinium fenestratum) was widely found in central Binh Phuoc province’s Phuoc Long district a few years ago but now could hardly be seen after being over harvested.


Medicinal herbs in Vietnam were mainly grown, processed and traded by private businesses, making it difficult to meet standards, Quang said.


The administration also warned about quality of the medicinal materials when most of the materials were illegally imported.


Domestic pharmaceutical producers wanted to reduce production costs by purchasing domestic medicinal materials but faced insufficient supply, said Nguyen Tien Hung, general director of Medical Products Import Export Joint Stocks Company.


He said it was necessary to offer incentives for growing, processing and using medical herbs. Relevant authorities needed to improve their management of medicinal plant growing and trading.


Source: VNA


Source: QDND

Textiles and garments need steady growth

In Uncategorized on July 4, 2010 at 4:09 pm




Textiles and garments need steady growth


QĐND – Sunday, July 04, 2010, 20:55 (GMT+7)


Although textiles and garments have experienced constant growth, there are still serious problems facing the sector such as a labour shortage and reliance on imported materials.

Positive signs of growth


After seeing an average growth of 30 percent in recent years, Vietnam is now one of the world’s 10 biggest textile and garment exporters, accounting for 2.7 percent of the global market. In addition to finished products, Vietnam’s cotton fibre is now becoming popular in markets such as Turkey and Brazil.


With an export turnover of US$4.8 billion in the first two quarters of 2010, up 17 percent compared to last year, and US$1.4 billion more than that of crude oil, textiles and garments are now leading the major export products of Vietnam.


The US is now Vietnam’s biggest market with a growth rate of 15 percent, followed by Japan with 10 percent, and new markets like Taiwan, the Republic of Korea, and ASEAN.


In the US and Japanese markets, Vietnam’s textile and garment products hold the second biggest share after China. Vietnamese businesses also have contracts to export their product through the end of the year.


It seems quite possible for businesses to meet the target of earning US$10.5 billion by the end of this year, says Le Quoc An, chairman of the Vietnam Textile and Apparel Association.


Vietnam’s textile and garment sector currently has many advantages in attracting importers, raising its prestige and the competitiveness of its products.


However, the sector is facing many problems caused by the fluctuation of the financial market, prices of materials, and workforce.


Labour shortage


The labour shortage is one of a serious problem that puts pressure on textile and garment businesses.


Nguyen Ngoc Lan from Nha Be Garment Company said that although his company has signed contracts to export products through the first quarter of 2011, he is very worried about the shortage of workers.


It is, therefore, very necessary ensure the workforce for the production by boosting the productivity and increasing salaries for workers, Lan said.


Businesses are also looking forward to the state’s support policies, said Lan, adding that the department of taxation and the customs office need to hold workshops to help export businesses iron out snags.

Over-reliance on imported materials


In addition, the local garment sector relies too much on imported materials. The sector’s exports were valued at US$4.8 billion in the first half of this year, while its import of materials cost US$3.7 billion in the first five months, up 33.5 percent compared to a year earlier.


Economists say that Vietnamese garment and textile products are likely to enjoy more favourable competitive advantages in US and EU markets than Chinese products of the same kind which will have higher prices after China’s adjustment of its currency exchange rate relative to the US dollar on June 22, which increase the value of the Chinese yuan, driving up the price of Chinese garment materials.


However, they estimate that about 70 percent of Vietnam’s imported garment materials come from China, so the surging price will also lead to rising production costs for made-in-Vietnam products. Furthermore, the local garment sector is still facing difficulties in retaining partners and improving product quality to meet demanding foreign markets.


Senior economic expert Bui Kien Thanh emphasises that those products using a high proportion of imported materials from China will not have an export advantage. Only those products using locally-made materials will benefit, he adds.


Creating high added-value for garment products


The garment sector is striving to produce more materials domestically to ensure sustainable growth.


The Prime Minister has approved a cotton-growing project which will be implemented through 2015.


The Vietnam National Textile and Garment Group (Vinatex) also plans to invest more than VND1,400 billion in creating a higher added-value for home-made products. The group is cooperating with the Vietnam National Oil and Gas Group (PVN) to build the Dinh Vu fibre plant in the northern port city of Hai Phong, which is expected to meet the sector’s demand.


Moreover, four garment and dye centres will also be established in Ninh Binh, Nam Dinh, Long An and Tra Vinh provinces to encourage domestic and foreign businesses to invest in producing garment and textile materials.


Developing material input has become an urgent task of the garment sector to reduce production costs and increase competitiveness in the global market. Export growth must match for the increasing added-value of each product so that the sector can sharpen its competitive edge and account for a large proportion in the country’s export structure.

Source: VOV

Source: QDND

Experts say no need to worry over blood-sucking assassin bugs

In Uncategorized on July 1, 2010 at 2:36 pm

Though public concern has been raised, following recent articles released buy the media concerning “blood-sucking assassin bugs,” medical experts said not to fret too fearfully about such insects.

Blood-sucking assassin bugs found in Vietnam

Dr. Truong Xuan Lam from the Institute for Ecology and Biological Resources, stressed that no cases have been reported of ailments caused by bites received via the country’s blood-sucking assassin bugs.


Doctors also confirmed no bitten patients have required hospitalization so far, although some foreign countries reported victims of similar bugs that suffered from fatigue and weakened immune systems.


The bloodsucking insect, commonly referred to as the assassin bug, originates from Latin America.


This species of bug was discovered in Vietnam for the first time at the National Park in Tam Dao, northwest of Hanoi, in 2004. Some 30 assassin bug specimens have been collected in the northern provinces of Mai Chau and Hoa Binh, as well as from districts Cau Giay, Gia Lam, Ba Vi and Ha Dong in Hanoi.


Scientists at the Institute for Ecology and Biological Resources in Hanoi are studying two cases of Chagas disease, a debilitating infection allegedly spread by an insect, possibly the ‘assassin bug.’


A woman in the central City of Da Nang and two family members suffered bites from insects for one or two months.  Eventually she felt tired and sleepy, and her face swelled. The woman, searching for the culprit, captured several of them and sent them to the Institute for Ecology and Biological Resources.
 
At the same time, a man in Hanoi reported to suffer similar symptoms, the result of bites received of a strange kind of bug.


Dr. Lam said the insect has a flat body, brown color and short wings. It lives from 4-6 months and each individual can lay 500-1000 eggs.


Assassin bugs are occasionally found in bathtubs, sinks, or drains and, if handled carelessly, can inflict a very painful bite, causing a severe reaction in some persons. Some species only come out at night within hot locations plagued by diminished hygiene.


Dr. lam warned people not to be frightened by the strange insect, yet they should clean their houses, checking spaces under tables and beds to find the bug.

Source: SGGP