wiki globe

Posts Tagged ‘Only’

Selling dollars to essential-product importers only, says SBV

In Uncategorized on November 27, 2010 at 11:20 am

The State Bank of Vietnam will keep close eyes on selling dollars to essential-product importers at local lenders as it continues to sell the greenback until the end of the year, said vice governor.

A cash teller at the HCMC-based ACB Bank poses piles of dollars. (Photo by Minh Tri)



 


Surge in the foreign exchange rate of Vietnam dong and US dollar on the so-called black market was halted after the State Bank of Vietnam announced it would sell dollars to the market.


 


The Vietnam dong is VND21,260 per dollar on 22nd November on the so-called black market, edging up VND260 in the last two weeks.


 


Despite the central bank’s announcement, local businesses said they struggled to buy the greenbacks from local banks.


 


They explained that they had to exchange the greenback on the so-called black market at the rate of VND20,500-21,260 per dollar, VND500-1,400 higher than local lenders’ announced rate. 


 


Central bank Vice Governor Tran Minh Tuan promised that the state bank will continue to sell dollars to local importers trading essential products, mainly in medicine, steel and sugar, until year end in accordance with the government’s instructions.


 


The state lender sold US$300 million to the market in the first two weeks this month and will continue to sell more, Mr. Tuan said. “The government’s had to use dollars from inward remittance and foreign investments to fill up the trade deficit for many years. Therefore, exporters should also support the domestic greenback supply by selling back dollar to local lenders,” the vice governor said.


 


Mr. Tuan also said that the central bank supervises the dollar selling at local lenders by setting up supervisory teams.


 


The State Bank of Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City branch last week helped 14 importers trading essential productions to get loans with preferential interest rates.


 


However, some commercial banks still shunned the central bank’s regulation, selling dollars to some importers to trade luxury cell phones, cosmetics and even some agriculture products that can be produced in local market, according to Ho Huu Hanh, director of the central bank’s Ho Chi Minh City.


 


“It’s hard to find out good clients during tough times. Therefore, we hardly turn down a dollar buying requirement from big clients, who want to import non-essential products,” a director of a local lender, who asked not to be named, said.


 


“On the other hand, we also hesitate to sell dollars to importers trading essential products as we don’t know much about the company’s business status,” he added.


 

Source: SGGP

Evacuation measures only partially effective for annually flooded central region

In Uncategorized on October 14, 2010 at 6:37 pm

A host of central residents relocated to resettlement areas have lamented that the policy has left them in less than ideal circumstances, as they now lack land for agricultural production.

Hundreds of families who live close to the sea wait to be resettled in Quy Nhon town, Binh Dinh Province (Photo: SGGP)

In the historic flood of 1999, which severely devastated the central region, the Vu Gia riverside village Phuong Trung was eliminated in Dai Quang Commune, Dai Loc District, Quang Nam Province. The village residents had nothing left as their houses together with other properties were swept into the sea.


Local authorities then decided to build a new village on a hill, 3 kilometers from the old village, to evacuate residents without any plan for farming production. Over the past ten years, people there have lived a difficult life.


Le Thi Kim, 62-year-old woman said that she is single but has to bring up her brother’s two orphaned children and her 86-year-old mother. Everyday, she leaves the village early in the morning to seek any work, including doing housework and taking care of other children in order to buy food.

“I am old now and just wish to have a garden to cultivate rice and vegetables,” she said.


Another village inhabitant named Pham Van Vinh said that he could not raise pigs or chicken as they all die due to the sweltering weather. He said his family earned VND30 million from breeding and selling groceries each year when they lived in the old village.


Also after the 1999 flood, 18 households in Ha Lac Village, Quang Loi Commune, Quang Dien District, Thua Thien-Hue Province were evacuated to a resettlement area. After over 10 years, they continue to experience a rough existence without electricity, paved roads, fresh water or schools. As a result, 14 of the 18 households have left their resettlement homes to return the old village or have traveled to other provinces and cities to earn livelihoods.


Hundreds of resettlement areas have been built in Thua Thien-Hue since 2005, in response to floods and storms. However, several residents have left the new houses to return to their old homes. As a result, the number of people that must evacuate when floods and storms occur still tops 80,000 in the province each year.


Resettlement


Hundreds of tottery houses are found dangerously close to waves that crash along the beaches in Hoai Nhon, Phu My and Phu Cat districts and Quy Nhon town of Binh Dinh Province.


One year after his house was swallowed by ocean tides, Vo Ngoc Van’s family, in Nhon Ly Commune of Quy Nhon town, is still awaiting resettlement.


Van’s house fell into the sea due to heavy rains caused by a tropical low-pressure system that swept through the area in May of 2009. His family has had to live with relatives. He said that local authorities have promised to arrange resettlement for his family, but one year has gone by and they have done nothing.


Most households said they agreed to evacuate from landslide prone areas to new resettlement areas, according to Pham Dung, who resettled at An My Commune in Phu My District. However, life remains difficult for them; to build a new house costs tens of millions, while the State only assists each family with VND10 million (US$526).


Binh Dinh People’s Committee has arranged resettlement for nearly 2,300 households in the province. However, they reported difficulties implementing this plan, due to a lack of capital.


Effective solution


The first flood-prevention houses in the central region were built in Ngu Hanh Son District of Danang City. Each two-story home was built solidly on 300 square meters and include a bathroom, reading room, kitchen and container that can hold 1,000 liters of fresh water.

A flood-prevention house in Ngu Hanh Son District, Danang City (Photo: SGGP)

Last year, when local people rushed to these houses to avoid floods, rescuers easily delivered rice and instant noodles to each house using motorboats.


The Central Natural Disasters Relief Fund has sponsored construction of 21 works to prevent natural disasters in low-lying areas in 10 central provinces and cities, said the fund director Nguyen Dang Lam.


The houses are used not only for avoiding floods, but also for other activities including musical performances, medical checks and treatment and teaching.


The fund will continue financing the building of another 30 works, including 15 flood-prevention houses in the region this year, Lam revealed.


On the other hand, Nguyen Thi Tuyet Mai from Quang Binh Province said that the State should provide residents with loans to rebuild or reinforce their houses, which would ease the local authorities’ pressure to evacuate residents during storm and flood seasons.

Source: SGGP

Evacuation measures only partially effective for annually flooded central region

In Uncategorized on August 3, 2010 at 11:20 am

A host of central residents relocated to resettlement areas have lamented that the policy has left them in less than ideal circumstances, as they now lack land for agricultural production.

Hundreds of families who live close to the sea wait to be resettled in Quy Nhon town, Binh Dinh Province (Photo: SGGP)

In the historic flood of 1999, which severely devastated the central region, the Vu Gia riverside village Phuong Trung was eliminated in Dai Quang Commune, Dai Loc District, Quang Nam Province. The village residents had nothing left as their houses together with other properties were swept into the sea.


Local authorities then decided to build a new village on a hill, 3 kilometers from the old village, to evacuate residents without any plan for farming production. Over the past ten years, people there have lived a difficult life.


Le Thi Kim, 62-year-old woman said that she is single but has to bring up her brother’s two orphaned children and her 86-year-old mother. Everyday, she leaves the village early in the morning to seek any work, including doing housework and taking care of other children in order to buy food.

“I am old now and just wish to have a garden to cultivate rice and vegetables,” she said.


Another village inhabitant named Pham Van Vinh said that he could not raise pigs or chicken as they all die due to the sweltering weather. He said his family earned VND30 million from breeding and selling groceries each year when they lived in the old village.


Also after the 1999 flood, 18 households in Ha Lac Village, Quang Loi Commune, Quang Dien District, Thua Thien-Hue Province were evacuated to a resettlement area. After over 10 years, they continue to experience a rough existence without electricity, paved roads, fresh water or schools. As a result, 14 of the 18 households have left their resettlement homes to return the old village or have traveled to other provinces and cities to earn livelihoods.


Hundreds of resettlement areas have been built in Thua Thien-Hue since 2005, in response to floods and storms. However, several residents have left the new houses to return to their old homes. As a result, the number of people that must evacuate when floods and storms occur still tops 80,000 in the province each year.


Resettlement


Hundreds of tottery houses are found dangerously close to waves that crash along the beaches in Hoai Nhon, Phu My and Phu Cat districts and Quy Nhon town of Binh Dinh Province.


One year after his house was swallowed by ocean tides, Vo Ngoc Van’s family, in Nhon Ly Commune of Quy Nhon town, is still awaiting resettlement.


Van’s house fell into the sea due to heavy rains caused by a tropical low-pressure system that swept through the area in May of 2009. His family has had to live with relatives. He said that local authorities have promised to arrange resettlement for his family, but one year has gone by and they have done nothing.


Most households said they agreed to evacuate from landslide prone areas to new resettlement areas, according to Pham Dung, who resettled at An My Commune in Phu My District. However, life remains difficult for them; to build a new house costs tens of millions, while the State only assists each family with VND10 million (US$526).


Binh Dinh People’s Committee has arranged resettlement for nearly 2,300 households in the province. However, they reported difficulties implementing this plan, due to a lack of capital.


Effective solution


The first flood-prevention houses in the central region were built in Ngu Hanh Son District of Danang City. Each two-story home was built solidly on 300 square meters and include a bathroom, reading room, kitchen and container that can hold 1,000 liters of fresh water.

A flood-prevention house in Ngu Hanh Son District, Danang City (Photo: SGGP)

Last year, when local people rushed to these houses to avoid floods, rescuers easily delivered rice and instant noodles to each house using motorboats.


The Central Natural Disasters Relief Fund has sponsored construction of 21 works to prevent natural disasters in low-lying areas in 10 central provinces and cities, said the fund director Nguyen Dang Lam.


The houses are used not only for avoiding floods, but also for other activities including musical performances, medical checks and treatment and teaching.


The fund will continue financing the building of another 30 works, including 15 flood-prevention houses in the region this year, Lam revealed.


On the other hand, Nguyen Thi Tuyet Mai from Quang Binh Province said that the State should provide residents with loans to rebuild or reinforce their houses, which would ease the local authorities’ pressure to evacuate residents during storm and flood seasons.

Source: SGGP

Only 10 percent of VN mothers breastfeed exclusively

In Uncategorized on July 31, 2010 at 7:19 pm




Only 10 percent of VN mothers breastfeed exclusively


QĐND – Saturday, July 31, 2010, 21:21 (GMT+7)

Health experts have called for urgent action to promote breastfeeding nationally in Vietnam.


This follows a recent survey showing that only 10 percent of Vietnamese children are breastfed exclusively during their first six months.


The call for action was launched on July 29 to mark the World Breastfeeding Week organised by the Ministry of Health and the United Nations under the “Alive and Thrive” initiative. The event is being organised in 120 countries.


“Health personnel and healthcare units play an important role in promoting breastfeeding,” said Deputy Minister of Health Nguyen Ba Thuy.


“Health staff at maternal and child healthcare units need to tell mothers to breastfeed babies within an hour of birth and to provide guidance on maintaining milk flow,” said Thuy.


Health workers overseas are taught that breastfeeding is more than a lifestyle choice, it’s an important health choice.


Infant formulas cannot match the exact chemical make-up of human milk, especially the cells, hormones, and antibodies that fight disease.


A recent survey showed that in Vietnam, few mothers initiate breastfeeding in the false belief that mother’s milk production is inadequate.


Le Minh Phuong, a state worker in Hanoi, complained that she could not maintain breastfeeding her baby for six months because the law stipulated she had to return to work after four months’ maternity leave.


“It is very difficult for mothers to maintain breastfeeding activities after maternity leave,” she said.


Lack of support from family members and health workers is another barrier to breastfeeding.


“A strong commitment from the health sector, government and international organisations is important”, said the United Nations Fund for Children acting representative in Vietnam Jean Dupraz.


Source: VNA


Source: QDND

Only 10 percent Vietnamese babies breastfed exclusively during first six months of life

In Uncategorized on July 30, 2010 at 7:20 am

Only 10 percent of children in Vietnam are breastfed exclusively during the first six months of life. This situation calls for urgent action to promote breastfeeding, particularly by healthcare providers and communities in Vietnam.

Breastfeeding exclusively during the first six months of life plays an important role in babies and infants’ lives.  


The Ministry of Health, the United Nations and the Alive & Thrive initiative co-organized a press conference to launch World Breastfeeding Week 2010 (WBW) and the “call for action” is just part of WBW.

Deputy Health Minister Nguyen Ba Thuy stressed breastfeeding is the most complete form of nutrition for infants and small children during the first six months of life, only 10 percent of children in Vietnam are breastfed exclusively during this critical period of their lives and only 55 percent of Vietnamese mothers initiate breastfeeding within the first hour after birth.

The main reasons cited for delayed initiation of breastfeeding are a belief that mothers’ breast milk production is inadequate; C-section deliveries; separation of mother and child immediately after birth; insufficient counselling from healthcare providers due to busy schedules; and the availability of milk formula.

Research has also found that feeding infants with water after breastfeeding is a popular practice in both urban and rural areas of Vietnam (‘exclusive breastfeeding’ means infants receive no food or drink other than breast milk unless doctor ordered).

Some mothers believe that they lack sufficient breast milk to adequately nourish their children up to six months and often begin to supplement breast milk with formula milk and/or other foods at around four months of age. For those employed in the formal sector (20-30 percent of all mothers), the need to return to work after four months of maternity leave poses a challenge to continued exclusive breastfeeding. Lack of support from family members and health workers is another barrier to mothers exclusively breastfeeding their children.

Themed “Breastfeeding: Just 10 Steps, the Baby-Friendly Way,” World Breastfeeding Week this year aims to highlight the vital role that healthcare workers and facilities play in promoting breastfeeding. It calls for every health facility providing maternity services and care for newborn infants to provide support to mothers in breastfeeding using the ten steps.


The ten steps to successful breastfeeding were first presented in the 1989 WHO/UNICEF Joint Statement on the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding: The Special Role of Maternity Services. Since then UNICEF and WHO have called for the implementation of the ten steps to successful breastfeeding in all maternity facilities because health workers play a critical role in influencing mothers’ decisions on how to feed their infants and young children.

WBW is celebrated in more than 120 countries to encourage breastfeeding as an important way to improve the health and development of infants and young children.


Efforts to encourage better breastfeeding practices in Vietnam are part of a national program on children and mother’s care to help ensure that children grow and reach their full potential. The country’s “Child Survival Action Plan” has set out the goal to achieve a 50 percent exclusive breastfeeding rate across the country by 2015.


The Ministry of Health will work closely with line ministries and mass media outlets to achieve the goal, recognizing that without improving breastfeeding rates and child nutrition would jeopardize attaining the Millennium Development Goals in Vietnam.

Source: SGGP

Only 350 medical techniques, services to suffer soaring prices: MOH

In Uncategorized on July 21, 2010 at 11:15 pm

Of 3,000 medical techniques and services, only around 350 would have their fees soar, said Vietnamese Ministry of Health (MOH) at a press conference on July 20, in response to public outcry over the recently proposed draft on hospital fee increases.

If new draft on hospital fee increases approved, it would be burden for 14.7 million disadvantaged people whose monthly income is  meager

MOH said hospital fee adjustments have excluded machinery depreciation, staff wages and training expenditures.


However, the prices of examinations and sickbeds will see the highest increase in rates. For instance, the price of clinical exams will rise from VND3,000 to VND30,000. Meanwhile, patients will have to pay VND100,000 –VND150,000 per day for normal or first class sickbeds, as opposed to the current price of just VND4,000 and VND18,000.


The Ministry alleged that it would not affect many residents, citing that 62 percent of the country’s population has health insurance cards and the number of insured people continues to rise.


The new draft would badly affect 14.7 million people, mostly low income laborers, farmers, ethnic minorities and those suffering from chronic and incurable health conditions, who have bought insurance voluntarily. This group of people would be burdened by increases in the five to 20 percent fee they are accustomed to paying, because their monthly income is meager.

Source: SGGP

Only four Hoan Kiem turtles believed left in world

In Uncategorized on March 24, 2010 at 5:30 am

Four Hoan Kiem turtles (Rafetus swinhoei), once native to eponymous Sword Lake in Hanoi, are thought to be the last of their species in the world.








File photo of a Hoan Kiem turtle in Hanoi. (Photo: Tien Phong)

Hoang Van Ha, a researcher from the Asian Turtle Conservation Program, said that two of the turtles remain wild in Hanoi’s Sword Lake and Dong Mo Lake, while the other two are in China where researchers are trying to breed them.


In 2008-2009, scientists at China’s Suzhou Zoo successfully bred the turtles twice, resulting in a total of 200 eggs produced. However, none of the eggs hatched.


Twenty-five species of turtle are in danger of extinction around the world. Vietnam is home to three of the species, including the Hoan Kiem turtle; a type of pond turtle found in the central region; and three-line box turtles.





Source: SGGP Bookmark & Share

Only 50 percent of businesses “survive”

In Uncategorized on March 24, 2010 at 4:49 am

Only half of the enterprises can survive and develop on the market after they register, according to the taskforce on supervising the implementation of the Enterprise and Investment Laws. Their recently released report on private economic sector operations reveals business difficulties.
 
The figures released annually by the Ministry of Planning and Investment showed that nearly 380,000 businesses had registered by December 31, 2008. With 83,000 businesses registered in 2009, the number had risen to 460,000 by December 2009.


If counting the number of registered businesses, businesses increased by 15 times within nine years from 31,000 in 2000 to 460,000 by the end of 2009. The growth rate in the number has been described as “impressive.”


According to the General Statistics Office’s figures released in 2009, however, Vietnam had had 178,852 non-state owned enterprises by December 31, 2008. These were businesses that had registered maintained their operations by that time. The total number of operational businesses in Vietnam at that point was 201,112.


General Taxation Department statistics demonstrated that, by the end of March 2009, Vietnam had had 272,680 non-state enterprises among 289,672 enterprises from different economic sectors.


As such, though the number of registered businesses is large, only 50 percent have continued to exist and develop. Difficulties have “killed” the other 50 percent.


However, economists have pointed out that 50 percent is a quite normal proportion seen in many countries, and that it does not mean that registered businesses have low quality.


According to the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the majority of enterprises are small and 25 percent of them are eliminated three years after registration. After five years, only 50 percent of registered businesses still survive, and only 30 percent continue to exist and develop after 10 years.


 





Source: SGGP Bookmark & Share