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Posts Tagged ‘protest’

Spanish unions protest retirement reform

In Uncategorized on December 19, 2010 at 7:57 am

Tens of thousands of Spanish workers staged strikes in 40 cities Saturday to protest state plans to up the retirement age to slash public deficit, the highest in the eurozone after Greece and Ireland.


The strikers gathered in central Madrid carrying red flags and holding placards such as “No to retirement at 67”, police said giving the estimates, adding they were essentially from the main UGT and CCOO unions.


“It’s a direct attack on the rights of workers, who have already suffered in the crisis for two years,” said Juan Carlos Caceres, a railway union leader.

A boy holds a placard reading, No to retirement at 67 during a rally in Madrid

Raising the retirement age “makes no sense because there is a very high level of youth unemployment,” said Maria Eugenia Marcos, an unemployed telecommunications worker.


However, the 56-year-old said the protests against the reforms were “weak” as many people realised that something needed to be done safeguard future pension pots.


The government aims to trim the public deficit from 11.1 percent of annual output last year to 6.0 percent in 2011 and three percent, the European Union limit, in 2013.


Ignacio Fernandez Toxo, the leader of the CCOO syndicate, threatened a repeat of a September 29 general strike in January when Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero unveils reforms which will see the retirement age increase by two years.


Zapatero reiterated his commitment to the reforms on the sidelines of a European Union summit on Friday, and his cabinet is expected to approve the measures on January 28.


Zapatero’s Socialists struck a deal on Wednesday with the conservative opposition on changes to the way pensions are calculated, although there is as yet no agreement on raising the retirement age.


The reforms are part of plans to soothe market fears that Spain could be dragged under by the tide of debt that has already drowned Greece and Ireland.


Adding to the concern over the nation’s finances and the potential implications for the eurozone, public debt rose to a 10-year high in the third quarter while bad bank loans struck a 14-year-high.

Source: SGGP

Russians protest Kremlin time zone plan

In Uncategorized on December 18, 2010 at 10:27 am

Several dozen people on the Russian Pacific coast on Saturday rallied against a Kremlin plan to cut the number of time zones to further the sprawling country’s economic integration.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev delivers a speech as he presents the Federal Security Service flag in Moscow on December 17, 2010.

President Dmitry Medvedev surprised the country last year when during his state-of the-nation address he suggested cutting the number of time zones in order to improve coordination across Russia.


At the time of his announcement, the country spanned 11 time zones from Kaliningrad on the Baltic Sea to Chukotka on the Bering Sea and earlier this year the number of time zones fell to nine.


Under the Kremlin plan, the country’s Primorye region on the Pacific is to go from being seven hours ahead of Moscow to six next year after Medvedev’s initiative was rubber-stamped by a local legislature.


Most local residents are however unhappy about the move which would mean reduced hours of daylight in the evening and several dozen campaigners including from opposition parties gathered in central Vladivostok to protest against the plan.


Some of the slogans spotted at the rally read “We are not vampires. We do not want to live at night” and “The president’s message: outrun and outdo time.”


In nearby Sakhalin region, which is also seven hours ahead of Moscow, campaigners have already collected several thousand signatures against the Kremlin initiative.


Medvedev has said eliminating time zones could help the residents of some remote Russian regions but critics have derided his idea as silly and proof that he is a weak leader incapable of implementing substantive reforms.


Russia was divided into 11 time zones in 1919. The Soviet Union introduced daylight saving in 1981 and it has continued ever since.


The elimination of the time zone will be accomplished by having residents not set their clocks forward when Russia switches to daylight savings time in March.


Galina Medvedeva, a deputy representing the Communist party in the local legislature, said at the protest the plan did not take people’s opinion into account.


“If they cancel switching from summer to winter time then it will be getting dark in our region virtually in the middle of the day,” she added.


The remote region bordering China has tight economic ties with Asia and its residents often scoff at the Kremlin’s initiatives, their independent streak sometimes manifesting itself in mass rallies unseen in central Russia.


In 2008, authorities had to dispatch riot police all the way from Moscow to break up a protest against higher tariffs on used imported cars.

Source: SGGP

Thousands of Irish protest austerity cuts

In Uncategorized on November 27, 2010 at 1:51 pm

Thousands gathered in Dublin for a mass protest Saturday against savage cutbacks needed to obtain an international bailout for debt-ravaged Ireland, heaping more pressure on the embattled government.

An Irish policeman (L) is confronted by protestors as they break through the front gates of the Irish Prime Minister’s office in Dublin, Ireland.

Police said they expected about 50,000 people to join a march against the four-year austerity package announced on Wednesday by Prime Minister Brian Cowen, aimed at slashing Ireland’s huge budget deficit.


Up to 3,000 people gathered at the start of the protest, holding placards saying “Eire not for sale, not to the IMF”.


“The cuts are not necessary. The banks are being rescued, not Ireland. The banks should take the hit — cut them loose,” said Marian Hamilton, 57, who was attending the protest with her seven-year-old grandson.


The demonstration will pile more pressure on Cowen the day after his Fianna Fail party suffered a humiliating by-election defeat which cut the FF/Green Party coalition’s parliamentary majority to just two.


Cowen has been fighting off calls from opposition lawmakers to quit, insisting he must see through the austerity package and a budget due on December 7 because they are pre-conditions for the bailout.


European Union heavyweights Germany and France are urging a rapid conclusion to negotiations on the EU and International Monetary Fund loans, reportedly worth up to 85 billion euros (113 billion dollars).


Sources in Brussels said the talks, aimed at shoring up Ireland and stopping the crisis spreading to other troubled eurozone countries, would likely wrap up Sunday in time for an announcement before markets open Monday.


Media reports suggest Ireland might be charged 6.7 percent interest on the nine-year loans, significantly more than the 5.2 percent rate charged to fellow eurozone country Greece when it was bailed out earlier this year.


The 15-billion-euro austerity package will cut the minimum wage and slash 25,000 public sector jobs as Ireland strives to bring its deficit under three percent of gross domestic product by 2014. It is currently at 32 percent.


Irish Congress of Trade Unions president Jack O’Connor, the head of Ireland’s biggest union SIPTU, said it was “the harshest budget since the foundation of the state”.


“This is the result of allowing speculators, bankers and developers to run riot, pillaging and ruining our economy,” he said.


Ireland’s national sovereignty was at stake, he said, adding: “We must not stand idly by while the final nail is driven into the coffin.”


Hundreds of police officers and a helicopter were mobilised for Saturday’s march through Dublin city centre to the General Post Office, the highly symbolic site of the declaration of Irish independence in 1916.


Cowen’s government has insisted that Ireland’s austerity plan and next month’s budget are crucial steps to show fellow members of the 16-nation euro area that it is putting its finances in order.


He refused to go to the polls until lawmakers have passed the measures, not likely before January, but opposition parties have said he no longer has a mandate to govern.


In Friday’s by-election in Donegal, the opposition socialist Sinn Fein party took what was once a stronghold of Cowen’s Fianna Fail party.


Labour Party leader Eamon Gilmore said the party “has neither the political mandate nor the moral authority to make the crucial decisions the country now faces.”


The Irish Times said the budget would probably go through given the pressure from the EU and the IMF, but added: “There is a general consensus that Mr Cowen’s days are numbered.”


Meanwhile Michael Noonan, finance spokesman for the Fine Gael main opposition party, described reports of the 6.7 interest rate on the bailout loan as “very disturbing”.


“This rate is far too high and is unaffordable on any reasonable projection of growth,” he said.


 

Source: SGGP

Japanese whaler cleared of ramming protest boat

In Uncategorized on November 18, 2010 at 6:26 am

Sarkozy hopes end in sight for French pension protest

In Uncategorized on October 25, 2010 at 9:36 am

President Nicolas Sarkozy hopes to put his titanic battle to raise France’s retirement age behind him this week by signing the measure into law despite a new wave of strikes, rallies and fuel blockades.


With thousands of families heading off for school half-term holidays, and lawmakers expected to give the pensions bill their formal final approval on Wednesday, Sarkozy hopes the mass protest movement will die away.


But, with Sunday newspaper opinion polls showing the embattled president more unpopular than ever, trade unions and student bodies have declared at least two more days of action, and strikes continue in the key fuel sector.

A motorcyclist queues up with drivers at a gas station in Nantes, western France

A poll by the IFOP institute for the weekly JDD found Sarkozy’s approval rating had dropped below 30 percent for the first time, clouding his hopes that passing the pensions law could kick start a political comeback.


French university students are planning to march on Tuesday to defend the right to retire at 60, and trade unions have called their campaign’s seventh one-day nationwide strike and day of rallies on Thursday.


Meanwhile, one petrol station in four around the country has run dry, amid strikes at refineries and blockades of fuel depots by strikers playing a cat and mouse game with riot police sent to disperse them.


Government supporters were putting a brave face on things, however, betting that on Wednesday — when the National Assembly rubber stamps the pensions law already approved by both houses of parliament — the movement will fizzle.


“In France we have a sort of ritual from another century. Strikes, protests, yes, but taking the economy hostage is intolerable,” said Jean-Francois Cope, leader of the right-wing UMP in parliament, in an interview with Le Parisien.


The pensions reform bill was approved by the Senate on Friday, and on Monday the text will be reconciled with the draft passed earlier by the lower house.


Following its adoption, France’s constitutional court may be asked to sign off on its legality and Sarkozy expects to be able to put it into the official gazette on November 15, advisor Raymond Soubie told Europe 1 radio.


“This reform will pass. It’s a victory for France and the French,” he said, noting that recent protests against the reform had failed to paralyse public services and that labour leaders had been “quite reasonable”.


Government expects the merged text will then receive final approval by the National Assembly on Wednesday, raising the minimum retirement age from 60 to 62 by 2018 and increasing the period of salary contributions to 41 years.


Sarkozy defends the measure as “inevitable” in the face of France’s rapidly growing population and burgeoning budget deficit, but opponents accuse him of making workers pay while protecting the rich and the world of finance.


The president is due to face re-election in 2012, and the Socialist party has vowed that if its candidate wins, he or she will restore retirement at 60.


While most voters polled say they support the strikes, and each protest day has so far drawn more than a million marchers, Sarkozy is gambling that if he forces the law through he will be hailed as a strong leader by the right.


Strikes continue, however, particularly in the oil industry and around 70 ships are waiting at anchor off the southern port of Marseille unable to dock and unload.


“In the Paris region we have 35 percent of filling stations that have run dry or are out of at least one fuel product, and in the west of the country a third are in real difficulty,” said a spokeswoman for the transport ministry.


An advisor of Sarkozy said in a television interview that one in four pumps were dry nationwide, but said the situation would improve.

Energy Minister Jean-Louis Borloo warned drivers to expect shortages on Monday, echoing a warning from the association representing retail petrol stations of shortages as many tanker drivers took their traditional Sunday day off, despite the government having exceptionally allowed them to work.

Meanwhile MEDEF, the organisation representing French business, warned about the serious impact the protest was having on its members, citing in particular road and rail disruption.

Source: SGGP

New week marks turning point in French pension protest

In Uncategorized on October 24, 2010 at 11:59 am

PARIS, Oct 24, 2010 (AFP) – The titanic battle over French President Nicolas Sarkozy’s bid to raise the retirement age reached a turning point Sunday at the start of a new week of strikes, rallies and fuel blockades.


With thousands of families heading off for school half-term holidays, and lawmakers preparing to give the pensions bill their formal final approval, Sarkozy hopes that the mass protest movement will start to die away.

A cruise ship, surrounded by blocked tankers, waits off the port of Marseille, southern France, on October 23, 2010, after having been denied access due to an harbour’s workers strike against the government’s pension plan reform and against a port reform scheme. AFP

But, with opinion polls showing the embattled president more unpopular than ever, trade unions and student bodies have declared at least two more days of action, and strikes continue in the key fuel sector.


A poll by the IFOP institute for the weekly JDD newspaper showed Sarkozy’s approval rating had dropped below 30 percent for the first time, clouding his hopes that passing the pensions law could kick start a political comeback.


French university students are planning to march on Tuesday to defend the right to retire at 60, and trade unions have called their campaign’s seventh one-day nationwide strike and day of rallies on Thursday.


Meanwhile, one petrol station in four around the country has run dry, amid strikes at refineries and blockades of fuel depots by strikers playing a cat and mouse game with riot police sent to disperse them.


Government supporters were putting a brave face on things, however, betting that on Wednesday — when the National Assembly rubber stamps a pensions law already approved by both houses — the movement will fizzle.


“In France we have a sort of ritual from another century,” complained Jean-Francois Cope, leader of Sarkozy’s right-wing UMP in parliament, in an interview with Le Parisien newspaper.


“Strikes, protests, yes, but taking the economy hostage is intolerable,” he said. “Most of the country paralysed by the actions of a handful of extremists. Everyone should understand that we have no other choice.”


The pensions reform bill was approved by the Senate on Friday, and on Monday the text will be reconciled with the draft passed earlier by the lower house.


Government expects the merged text will then receive final approval by the National Assembly on Wednesday, raising the minimum retirement age from 60 to 62 by 2018 and increasing the period of salary contributions to 41 years.


Sarkozy defends the measure as “inevitable” in the face of France’s rapidly growing population and burgeoning budget deficit, but opponents accuse him of making workers pay while protecting the rich and the world of finance.


The president is due to face re-election in 2012, and the Socialist party has vowed that if its candidate wins, he or she will restore retirement at 60.


While most voters polled say they support the strikes, and each protest day has so far drawn more than a million marchers, Sarkozy is gambling that if he forces the law through he will be hailed as a strong leader by the right.


To this end, on Friday the government sent in riot police to clear access to a blocked fuel depot and served legal orders on some striking oil workers ordering them to return to work.


Strikes have continued across the industry, however, and around 70 ships are waiting at anchor off the southern port of Marseille unable to dock and unload. Nevertheless, officials predict a slow return to normal.


“In the Paris region we have 35 percent of filling stations that have run dry or are out of at least one fuel product, and in the west of the country a third are in real difficulty,” said a spokeswoman for the transport ministry.


Elsewhere, between 10 and 15 percent of stations are out, she added.


Meanwhile, in the southern city of Marseille — where garbage has been piling up in the streets for two weeks — authorities issued a legal order aimed at compelling striking rubbish collectors to re-open two dumps.

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Source: SGGP

A million protest pensions plan as fuel shortages bite

In Uncategorized on October 20, 2010 at 4:07 am

PARIS (AFP) – Strikes threatening to paralyse France’s economy looked set to rumble on into Wednesday after a million people took to the street for their right to retire at 60 and fuel shortages began to bite.


Clashes erupted between youths and riot police in several towns Tuesday and shops in the city of Lyon were looted as workers and students came out in force around the country to protest President Nicolas Sarkozy’s unpopular reform.

People demonstrate in Marseille, southern France. AFP

Sarkozy refused to back down however and leading unions in some sectors including airports called for stoppages to continue on Wednesday, while oil refineries remained blocked, hit by a week of strikes.


The DGAC aviation authority said a quarter of flights from Orly, Paris’s second-biggest airport, would be cancelled on Wednesday morning but did not detail further disruption at the main hub, Charles de Gaulle.


Around one in three flights at Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and regional airports were cancelled on Tuesday, while one in three filling stations ran out of fuel, the government said.


The latest day of protests, the sixth since September, drew around 1.1 million people onto the streets, police said, slightly fewer than the 1.23 million on the last comparable day, October 12.


The CGT, France’s biggest union, told AFP it estimated overall turnout at 3.5 million, equal to its estimate for October 12. Unions’ estimates have habitually been several times higher than those of police.


With more than 200 protests on Tuesday, all 12 French oil refineries shut down by strikes and truckers blocking roads, Sarkozy instructed the cabinet to draw up a plan to stop France grinding to a standstill.


Environment and Transport Minister Jean-Louis Borloo said that “a little under 4,000 petrol stations are awaiting deliveries.” There are around 12,500 filling stations in France.


French fuel and heating federation FF3C said the “extremely worrying” situation “should definitely be called a shortage”, while the International Energy Agency said France has “sufficient stocks” to deal with the situation.


Authorities in Normandy requisitioned 12 petrol stations for use by rescue and emergency services, while Prime Minister Francois Fillon said a third of departments or local administrations were experiencing fuel shortages.


Fillon chaired a meeting with several ministers and oil industry officials on how to deal with the crisis and ministers later held talks with Sarkozy.


Fillon’s office said the government would ensure access to fuel depots, many of which are blocked by strikers, and that distributors would pool their fuel and trucks to help needy stations.


The interior minister promised tough action as clashes erupted anew outside a secondary school in Nanterre, near Paris, where youths burned a car and threw rocks at riot police for the second day in a row.


Police fired tear gas and arrested nine youth protestors in Lyon who had overturned cars and set one alight. At least five shops were later looted, police said.


Nine people were arrested Tuesday in Paris, police said.


The ministry said that 1,158 troublemakers had been arrested at demonstrations since the start of the week, 163 of them on Tuesday morning.


The powerful CGT union’s transport section called for their strike action to be renewed on Wednesday, encompassing airport staff, air traffic controllers, public transport workers and employees of national railways operator SNCF.


Unions want to force Sarkozy to abandon a bill to raise the minimum retirement age to 62, which is in the final days of its journey through a parliament in which the right-wing leader enjoys a comfortable majority.


Most French back the current protests, with a poll published Monday in the popular Le Parisien daily showing that 71 percent of those asked expressed either support or sympathy for the movement.


A poll published Tuesday showed that Sarkozy’s approval rating dropped this month to its lowest in three years at 30 percent, two percentage points less than when the main pension protests started in September.

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Source: SGGP

Cars burned, fuel short in France pensions protest

In Uncategorized on October 19, 2010 at 4:23 pm

France faces a sixth day of national protests Tuesday against President Nicolas Sarkozy’s pensions reform, with the stakes rising after youths battled riot police and filling stations ran dry.


Tuesday’s coordinated protest is the latest in a series of mounting actions against Sarkozy’s plan to raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and follows days of strikes, skirmishes and full-blown street marches.


On Monday police fired tear gas and rubber bullets at youths who set a car on fire, smashed bus stops and hurled rocks outside a school in Nanterre, near Paris, blocked by students protesting the pensions reform.


Youths threw petrol bombs at police outside a school in another Paris suburb, Combes-la-Ville, police said. In Lyon, hooded youngsters burned at least three cars they had overturned during clashes with riot police.


A striker throws a tyre on a fire during a protest outside a fuel storage depot on October 18, 2010 in Donges, western France.

The interior ministry said police arrested 290 rioters in various towns, and that four police officers had been injured in the scuffles.


Nearly 300 schools were disrupted by protests, officials said, and cities across France saw students take part in fresh street demonstrations, several of which saw police arresting rampaging youths.


Meanwhile, truck drivers also joined the movement that has brought millions onto the streets in recent weeks, and rubbish continued to pile up in the streets of Marseille due to a strike by collectors.


“We now need to block the economy to force the government to withdraw its plan,” said Vincent Duse, a CGT union leader at an auto factory in Mulhouse.


Truckers staged go-slows on motorways near Paris and several provincial cities, drivers blocked access to goods supply depots and joined oil workers blocking fuel depots to defend their right to retire at 60.


Production at all France’s oil refineries remained shut down since last week, causing hundreds of filling stations to run dry, industry associations said.


The government announced it had activated an emergency crisis cell charged with maintaining fuel supplies


“We will stay here as long as we can,” said the CFDT’s Joseph Sieiro, one of the hundred people, most of them truckers, who turned up to block an oil terminal at Port-La-Nouvelle in southern France.


Further disruption was due on Tuesday, the sixth coordinate national action in less than two months.


Half of all flights to and from Paris Orly airport and 30 percent of flights at Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and other French airports will be cancelled due to Tuesday’s strikes, aviation officials said.


The government has so far shown no sign of backing down and Sarkozy vowed on Monday that the reform will pass.


“This reform is essential. France is committed to it. France will carry it out,” he told reporters.


Unions want to force Sarkozy to abandon a bill to raise the minimum retirement age to 62, which is in the final days of its journey through a parliament in which the right-wing leader enjoys a comfortable majority.


Sarkozy has staked his credibility on the bill, but unions are hoping for a repeat of 1995, when Jacques Chirac’s government backed down on pension reform after a paralysing transport strike.

The government has shown no sign of backing down on the reform, currently being examined by the Senate, which on Monday pushed back the final vote until at least Thursday with hundreds of amendments still to be debated.

Most French back the current protests, with a poll published Monday in the popular Le Parisien daily showing that 71 percent of those asked expressed either support or sympathy.

“It is perfectly normal and natural that this (reform) causes worries and opposition,” Sarkozy told reporters in Deauville, western France, where he was due to hold a summit with Russia and Germany.

“It is also normal and natural that a democratic government… should ensure motorists can find fuel and that there are no clashes.”

Source: SGGP

France braces for another pension reform protest

In Uncategorized on October 16, 2010 at 2:24 pm

France braced for another day of street rallies against pension reform Saturday as rolling strikes cut the fuel pipeline to Paris airports and shut down most of the country’s oil refineries.


High-school students have increasingly joined the protests against President Nicolas Sarkozy’s plan to raise the minimum retirement age from 60 to 62, with riot police firing tear gas and arresting over 200 at student rallies on Friday.


Interior Minister Brice Hortefeux has told police to “limit the use of force to what is strictly necessary” when dealing with the students ahead of Saturday’s protests, the fifth in less than six weeks.


Unions want to pummel the government into backing down on its pension reform plans, staging strikes on weekdays and mass demonstrations in cities at the weekend. Over 230 rallies are planned for Saturday, the CGT union said.


The strikes have shut down 10 out of 12 of France’s oil refineries, despite riot police being dispatched to keep the fuel flowing amid reports of panic buying.


The government has given oil companies permission to tap into their own emergency stocks, but has resisted calls to open the part of the French strategic fuel reserve controlled by a government committee.


Lack of supply forced the shutdown of the fuel pipeline to Paris’s two main airports as well as depots outside the capital.


The main Paris air hub, Roissy Charles de Gaulle, only has enough aviation fuel to last 48 hours, La Tribune financial daily reported, and authorities have advised planes arriving there to bring enough fuel for the return flight.


“Aviation companies are worried. Air France expecially,” the paper said.


Because of a Belgian railway workers’ strike over deadlocked negotations, all high-speed Thalys trains between Paris and Brussels will be cancelled. Eurostar trains travelling under the Channel will be unaffected.


National railway operator SNCF said that on average two out of three high-speed TGV trains would be running in and out of Paris, although only one TGV in four will run outside the capital.


The Paris metro will be running normally, with operator RATP saying that only five percent of its workers were on strike on Friday.


Unions and the Socialist opposition have vowed to defend the right to retire at 60. They accuse Sarkozy of making workers carry the burden for the failure of the financial sector, and have proposed increasing taxes on the rich.


A nationwide day of strikes and demonstrations last Tuesday brought more than a million people on to the streets, and workers in some sectors have kept up their stoppages since then. Another mass strike is planned for next Tuesday.


Despite the ongoing strikes and protests, the government showed no sign of retreating from what is a cornerstone of Sarkozy’s reform agenda as he prepares for his likely re-election battle in 2012.


Key sections of the reform have been passed by the upper house Senate and the government hopes for it to be passed in its entirety by the end of the month.

Source: SGGP

Thousands of Chinese hold anti-Japan protest marches

In Uncategorized on October 16, 2010 at 2:23 pm

Thousands of Chinese protesters marched in at least three cities on Saturday to vent their anger at Japan following a nasty spat involving disputed islands, state media and witnesses said.


Meanwhile nationalist groups rallied in Japan on Saturday against China’s “invasion” into Japanese islands, scuffling with men who tried to block the march through central Tokyo streets.


In China, demonstrators in the cities of Xian, Chengdu and Zhengzhou shouted slogans asserting Chinese sovereignty over the islands and called for boycotts of Japanese goods, the state-run Xinhua news agency said.


Some protesters had learned about the planned demonstrations on the Internet and came to join, it said, but added that the protests were peaceful and watched closely by police stationed along marching routes.


In Japan, Japanese national flags fluttered in a park in the capital as more than 1,000 people gathered for the second major rally since a bitter territorial row flared up over a maritime incident last month near the disputed islands.


Banners carried such messages as “Japan is in danger!” and “Don’t forgive invader China”.


As demonstrators left the park and started a march, two young men, believed to be Chinese, sat in the street to stop the rally.


One of their banners warned against exclusionism and read: “Stop fuelling harassment towards Chinese residents in Japan”.


China broke off contacts with Tokyo last month after Japan detained a Chinese fishing boat captain whose vessel collided with Japanese coastguard ships near the disputed islands.


Both sides claim the islands in the East China Sea which are known as Diaoyu in China and Senkaku in Japan.


The two close trading partners have since moved to patch up the row, but the protests showed lingering public anger at Japan, which is still resented in China for its brutal World War II invasion and occupation of parts of China.


 

Source: SGGP