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Posts Tagged ‘rescued’

Eight fishermen rescued after boat hit by cargo vessel

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 9:32 am


Eight fishermen were rescued after their boat was hit by an cargo-boat which run away after the accident offshore the central province of Thua Thien Hue on November 28.

Fishing boats in Thua Thien Hue Province’s Thuan An seaport. (File photo)


The accident took place at around 11 pm, when the boat was fishing in the sea. The boat carrying eight fishermen, including captain Nguyen Cong Duyen, 50, was hit by cargo vessel 195 Ha Minh from Hai Phong.


Chairman of Vinh Thanh Commune  Dao Duy Phuong said it involved 20 fishing boats in the local in rescuing the fishermen and fishing the sinking boat out of the sea.


The authorities are also looking for the cargo-boat.


In related news, authorities from the central province of Quang Ngai on November 29 sent workers to the Hoang Sa (Paracel) archipelago area in an effort to salvage 16 fishermen on a sinking boat.


Fishing boat QNg 96020 from Quang Ngai Province’s Ly Son Island sank after its water pumping system broke November 26.


The fishermen on board sent SOS signals while bailing out seawater from the boat.
Local sea police plan to either fix the boat or tow it home as soon as possible.


 

Source: SGGP

Rescued Chilean miners hold emotional reunion

In Uncategorized on October 18, 2010 at 10:24 am

COPIAPO, Chile, Oct 17 (AFP) – Rescued Chilean miners have celebrated an emotional mass at the scene of their record-breaking survival amid some strains over the media frenzy surrounding them.


Thirteen survivors, accompanied by partners and children, took part in a private ceremony Sunday after visiting the tent city where relatives refused to give up hope, waiting anxiously for 10 long weeks for their safe return.

Chilean miner Jorge Galleguillos (R), one of the 33 recently rescued from the San Jose mine, is shown back at the mine for a Mass on October 17, 2010. AFP

Claudio Yanez, who proposed to his longtime companion Cristina Nunez during the ordeal, toured Camp Hope with his tiny daughter in his arms, peering into tents now empty and battered by the strong Atacama desert winds.


“This was a city,” he said, while workers slowly set about taking down the makeshift shelters that became home to thousands of relatives and well wishers as the massive rescue effort reached its euphoric climax on Wednesday.


Dario Segovia, a rescued drill operator whose sister Maria was nicknamed “The Mayoress” for the leadership role she assumed at the camp, paid tribute to the stoicism of the miners’ families.


“Everyone suffered out here as we suffered down there,” he said.


Many miners did not attend the mass as they were still recuperating after their 69-day ordeal, while others were sleeping off family celebrations that ran late into Saturday night following their release from hospital.


Only one miner, Victor Zamora, remains in the care of doctors and he is expected to remain under medical observation until at least Tuesday after undergoing serious dental surgery.


The return to the mine was part of what is expected to be a long process of readjustment for the 33 men, who have become national heroes and garnered global attention for their miraculous survival and dramatic rescue.


Their newfound fame could bring them riches, but they also plan to use it to improve the fate of miners worldwide, they said.


But some miners and their families began showing strains from the media frenzy over their spectacular tale of survival, with some apparently adhering to a “pact of silence” over the ordeal.


At least three miners contacted by AFP confirmed that there is an agreement of silence, but only about the first 17 days of their ordeal, when they survived on sparsely rationed bites of tuna and drank dirty mine water until they were able to get word to rescuers that they were alive.


“We will not talk about the first 17 days until the investigation (into the mine collapse) is complete,” said Carlos Bugueno, one of the rescued workers.


But fellow miner Omar Reygadas said there was no such pact.


“There is no pact of silence,” he said. “There is nothing to hide, we went through the experience as partners, there is nothing to be ashamed about.”


Still, Reygadas grew impatient as he navigated through a crowd of news crews around the tent where his family slept while he was trapped.


“Give me my space please,” he said.


Fellow miner Claudio Acuna was with a crying baby, riding in a car surrounded by journalists. A woman inside said to the him: “Smile, so they can take your picture, and then they will leave us alone.”


Although the miners in the camp had no problems posing for the cameras, almost all of them refused to give statements to the press.


Police had to intervene to allow the miners to tour the remnants of Camp Hope, at the foot of the San Jose Mine, where the accident occurred.


At a press conference Saturday, miner Juan Illanes, who acted as spokesman for the group, urged the media to have patience in reporting and said that the miners expected to write a book about their experience.


“We have to do something together, the experience must be put to use,” Illanes told El Mercurio newspaper. “We have to decide how to direct our project so this type of thing never happens again.”


Yonni Barrios, who famously asked both his wife and his girlfriend to come to the mine and greet him on Wednesday, told AFP the men wanted to find a way to advise companies on making mines safer.


“We’re thinking about creating a foundation to solve problems in the mining industry,” he said. “With this, with the experience that we have had, God help us, we should be able to solve these problems.”

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Source: SGGP

China returns rescued Conson victims to Vietnam

In Uncategorized on August 2, 2010 at 7:18 am

China returned 23 Vietnamese fishermen it rescued during Typhoon Conson to Vietnam on August 1.

Several of the 23 Vietnamese victims of Typhoon Conson returned by China to Vietnam on August 1 (Photo: DaT Viet)

The hand-over was made at the Mong Cai International border gate, in Mong Cai City, Quang Ninh Province.


Of these victims, 10 came from Quang Nam Province, 11 from Khanh Hoa Province, and two from Ninh Thuan Province.


All of them were in relatively good health when handed over to Vietnam.


They were caught in the tropical storm Conson on July 18 and 19 while fishing on five boats before being saved by a Chinese search and rescue team. Afterward, they stayed in Sanya City, Hainan Province, China.


Vietnam’s agencies concerned are carrying out necessary procedures to return them to their homes.

Source: SGGP

Danish tanker rescued from Somali pirates: task force

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 11:25 am

MANAMA, April 5, 2010 (AFP) – A Danish tanker escaped a pirate attack in the Gulf of Aden after a French patrolling aircraft forced the Somali attackers to flee, the multi-national anti-piracy force said Monday.


The tanker MV Torm Ragnhild sent a distress call after pirates on two skiffs fired rifles and rocket-propelled grenades at it along an “internationally recommended transit corridor” on Sunday, the Combined Maritime Forces said.


A nearby French aircraft flew to the location where the Danish-flagged ship was trying to evade the attackers by speeding up, zig-zagging and spraying its fire hose, it said in a statement.


“The skiffs broke off their attack after sighting the aircraft,” it said, adding a Japanese aircraft spotted the pirates’ mother ship in the vicinity, identifying it as an Indian-flagged dhow named Safina Al-Gayatri.


The Turkish warship TCG Gelibolu shadowed the Safina as it carried the skiffs to Somalia’s coast, where the pirates abandoned the dhow, said the force, which is based with the US-Navy 5th Fleet in Manama, Bahrain.

A handout photo made available on April 4, 2010 by the EU Navfor Somalia shows the EU Navfor warship HNLMS Tromp (L) as pirate boats on April 2 try to make on approach on it. AFP photo

“Everything went like clockwork. The operation was professionally executed, and another piracy attack was successfully prevented,” said the task force’s commander, Singaporean Rear Admiral Bernard Miranda.


“The Gulf of Aden and the Somali Basin is a huge area… Close coordination and cooperation is extremely critical to optimise the counter-piracy resources in the area,” he said in the statement.


The narrow escape came after a South Korean oil tanker with 24 crew members on board was seized in the Gulf of Aden on Sunday as it headed from Iraq to the United States.


Despite the increased international military presence off Somalia’s coast — Africa’s longest — pirates raked in an estimated 60 million dollars last year.


Alongside the European Union, the United States and other national navies deployed warships off the coastline in December 2008 to protect shipping and secure maritime routes in the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean.

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Source: SGGP

Danish tanker rescued from Somali pirates: task force

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 11:24 am

MANAMA, April 5, 2010 (AFP) – A Danish tanker escaped a pirate attack in the Gulf of Aden after a French patrolling aircraft forced the Somali attackers to flee, the multi-national anti-piracy force said Monday.


The tanker MV Torm Ragnhild sent a distress call after pirates on two skiffs fired rifles and rocket-propelled grenades at it along an “internationally recommended transit corridor” on Sunday, the Combined Maritime Forces said.


A nearby French aircraft flew to the location where the Danish-flagged ship was trying to evade the attackers by speeding up, zig-zagging and spraying its fire hose, it said in a statement.


“The skiffs broke off their attack after sighting the aircraft,” it said, adding a Japanese aircraft spotted the pirates’ mother ship in the vicinity, identifying it as an Indian-flagged dhow named Safina Al-Gayatri.


The Turkish warship TCG Gelibolu shadowed the Safina as it carried the skiffs to Somalia’s coast, where the pirates abandoned the dhow, said the force, which is based with the US-Navy 5th Fleet in Manama, Bahrain.

A handout photo made available on April 4, 2010 by the EU Navfor Somalia shows the EU Navfor warship HNLMS Tromp (L) as pirate boats on April 2 try to make on approach on it. AFP photo

“Everything went like clockwork. The operation was professionally executed, and another piracy attack was successfully prevented,” said the task force’s commander, Singaporean Rear Admiral Bernard Miranda.


“The Gulf of Aden and the Somali Basin is a huge area… Close coordination and cooperation is extremely critical to optimise the counter-piracy resources in the area,” he said in the statement.


The narrow escape came after a South Korean oil tanker with 24 crew members on board was seized in the Gulf of Aden on Sunday as it headed from Iraq to the United States.


Despite the increased international military presence off Somalia’s coast — Africa’s longest — pirates raked in an estimated 60 million dollars last year.


Alongside the European Union, the United States and other national navies deployed warships off the coastline in December 2008 to protect shipping and secure maritime routes in the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean.

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Source: SGGP

110 rescued from flooded China mine

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 9:30 am

BEIJING (AFP) – More than 110 workers were pulled out of a Chinese coal mine Monday over a week after being trapped by flooding, in what has been hailed as a miracle rescue in the notoriously dangerous industry.


So far, 114 workers have been brought out alive from the half-built Wangjialing mine in Shanxi province and taken to hospital for treatment, state television and the Xinhua news agency reported.

Mine workers and rescuers wait to go down the entrance to the Wangjialing coal mine that flooded eight days ago in northern China’s Shanxi province. (AFP/File)

The news from Shanxi, where 153 workers became trapped when the state-owned mine flooded on March 28, was a rare bright spot for an industry known for its poor safety records and more than 2,600 deaths last year.


“How fantastic to be on ground again,” Xinhua quoted one 27-year-old survivor as saying.


The head of the State Administration of Work Safety, Luo Lin, told China Central Television he was excited about the “two miracles” after the accident, which authorities blamed on lax safety standards at the mine.


“The first is that these trapped people have made it through eight days and eight nights — this is the miracle of life. Secondly our rescue plan has been effective — this is a miracle in China’s search and rescue history,” Luo said.


Shanxi governor Wang Jun said there was “still a possibility” that 38 others could be saved, according to the China News Service. The fate of the last worker in the massive pit remained unclear.


CCTV showed survivors being brought out of the pit one after another, strapped to stretchers and wrapped in green blankets. Towels covered their eyes and blackened faces to protect them from lights after so long underground.


Groups of rescue workers wearing blue and orange jumpsuits loaded them into scores of awaiting ambulances, while medical personnel dressed in white administered intravenous drips and oxygen.


Provincial Communist party chief Zhang Baoshun said he was told that most of the survivors were in stable condition, and could speak, Xinhua said.


Most of the survivors were rescued from a platform above which rescuers had drilled a hole last week, ensuring those trapped had oxygen, the report said. Glucose was also sent down to the workers.


Many were nevertheless severely dehydrated, and doctors also feared gas poisoning from the bad air in the shaft, CCTV said.


The Beijing News quoted rescue workers as saying they had seen bodies in the mine, but no details were given.


“I have not slept for several days,” black-faced rescuer Wei Fusheng told state television as he wept with joy. “Our efforts have not been in vain.”


Footage of the rescue scenes in Shanxi, China’s coal producing heartland, played throughout the day as the country marked its annual “grave sweeping day,” a national holiday to mourn the dead.


Thousands of people lined the road from the mine, applauding as ambulances carrying the first survivors rushed past, Xinhua said.


“I have two daughters and a son. I had to do mining work to earn money for them,” said a 45-year-old survivor being treated in hospital.


At least 3,000 rescuers had been racing against time to pump water out of the mine. Rescuers only entered the shaft at the weekend but said there was more water than anticipated.


On Sunday night, a team of 100 rescue workers descended into the mine again and discovered the first nine survivors two hours later, before a second team was sent in. Up to 300 rescuers were in the pit by mid-morning Monday.


The accident occurred when workers apparently dug into an older adjacent mine that had been shut down and filled with water, press reports have said.


The work safety watchdog blamed the accident on the mine owner, the Huajin Coking Coal Company, which failed to heed repeated warnings that water was accumulating in the pit days before the disaster.


Workers had also been ordered to step up the pace of work in order to ensure that coal production began by October this year, the safety watchdog said.


Safety is often ignored in China’s collieries in the quest for quick profits and the drive to meet surging demand for coal — the source of about 70 percent of the country’s energy.


Last week was disastrous for China’s mining sector, with five separate accidents from the far-western Xinjiang region to the northeastern province of Heilongjiang. A total of 37 people were killed and 70 remain missing.

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Source: SGGP

110 rescued from flooded China mine

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 9:22 am

BEIJING (AFP) – More than 110 workers were pulled out of a Chinese coal mine Monday over a week after being trapped by flooding, in what has been hailed as a miracle rescue in the notoriously dangerous industry.


So far, 114 workers have been brought out alive from the half-built Wangjialing mine in Shanxi province and taken to hospital for treatment, state television and the Xinhua news agency reported.

Mine workers and rescuers wait to go down the entrance to the Wangjialing coal mine that flooded eight days ago in northern China’s Shanxi province. (AFP/File)

The news from Shanxi, where 153 workers became trapped when the state-owned mine flooded on March 28, was a rare bright spot for an industry known for its poor safety records and more than 2,600 deaths last year.


“How fantastic to be on ground again,” Xinhua quoted one 27-year-old survivor as saying.


The head of the State Administration of Work Safety, Luo Lin, told China Central Television he was excited about the “two miracles” after the accident, which authorities blamed on lax safety standards at the mine.


“The first is that these trapped people have made it through eight days and eight nights — this is the miracle of life. Secondly our rescue plan has been effective — this is a miracle in China’s search and rescue history,” Luo said.


Shanxi governor Wang Jun said there was “still a possibility” that 38 others could be saved, according to the China News Service. The fate of the last worker in the massive pit remained unclear.


CCTV showed survivors being brought out of the pit one after another, strapped to stretchers and wrapped in green blankets. Towels covered their eyes and blackened faces to protect them from lights after so long underground.


Groups of rescue workers wearing blue and orange jumpsuits loaded them into scores of awaiting ambulances, while medical personnel dressed in white administered intravenous drips and oxygen.


Provincial Communist party chief Zhang Baoshun said he was told that most of the survivors were in stable condition, and could speak, Xinhua said.


Most of the survivors were rescued from a platform above which rescuers had drilled a hole last week, ensuring those trapped had oxygen, the report said. Glucose was also sent down to the workers.


Many were nevertheless severely dehydrated, and doctors also feared gas poisoning from the bad air in the shaft, CCTV said.


The Beijing News quoted rescue workers as saying they had seen bodies in the mine, but no details were given.


“I have not slept for several days,” black-faced rescuer Wei Fusheng told state television as he wept with joy. “Our efforts have not been in vain.”


Footage of the rescue scenes in Shanxi, China’s coal producing heartland, played throughout the day as the country marked its annual “grave sweeping day,” a national holiday to mourn the dead.


Thousands of people lined the road from the mine, applauding as ambulances carrying the first survivors rushed past, Xinhua said.


“I have two daughters and a son. I had to do mining work to earn money for them,” said a 45-year-old survivor being treated in hospital.


At least 3,000 rescuers had been racing against time to pump water out of the mine. Rescuers only entered the shaft at the weekend but said there was more water than anticipated.


On Sunday night, a team of 100 rescue workers descended into the mine again and discovered the first nine survivors two hours later, before a second team was sent in. Up to 300 rescuers were in the pit by mid-morning Monday.


The accident occurred when workers apparently dug into an older adjacent mine that had been shut down and filled with water, press reports have said.


The work safety watchdog blamed the accident on the mine owner, the Huajin Coking Coal Company, which failed to heed repeated warnings that water was accumulating in the pit days before the disaster.


Workers had also been ordered to step up the pace of work in order to ensure that coal production began by October this year, the safety watchdog said.


Safety is often ignored in China’s collieries in the quest for quick profits and the drive to meet surging demand for coal — the source of about 70 percent of the country’s energy.


Last week was disastrous for China’s mining sector, with five separate accidents from the far-western Xinjiang region to the northeastern province of Heilongjiang. A total of 37 people were killed and 70 remain missing.

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Source: SGGP

Seven miners trapped underground rescued

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2008 at 3:04 pm

Seven out of the eight miners trapped underground in a coal mine accident in northern Quang Ninh province have been rescued.

Search is continuing for the remaining trapped miner.

The accident triggered by a water leakage occurred at 3 a.m. on August 10 at the Tay Khe Sim coal mine when 17 workers were dismantling equipment to halt production there.

The coal mine is currently operated by the Khe Tam Coal Enterprise, a subsidiary of the Ha Long Coal Company.

The cause of the accident is under further investigation.-