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Posts Tagged ‘summit’

US, Russian presidents hold impromptu summit

In Uncategorized on November 22, 2010 at 10:09 am

NATO opens summit on Afghan exit strategy

In Uncategorized on November 20, 2010 at 4:12 pm

Two Vietnamese to attend Int’l Youth Tiger Summit

In Uncategorized on November 19, 2010 at 1:59 pm

Russia summit seeks to save tiger from extinction

In Uncategorized on November 19, 2010 at 4:26 am

CLV summit pledges border development

In Uncategorized on November 18, 2010 at 1:57 am

Obama makes free trade push at Pacific Rim summit

In Uncategorized on November 13, 2010 at 8:54 am

Prime Minister to attend G20 Summit

In Uncategorized on November 10, 2010 at 2:26 pm

S.Korea hopes to settle currency row at G20 summit

In Uncategorized on November 1, 2010 at 4:41 am

US, Russia join Asian summit as regional spats simmer

In Uncategorized on October 30, 2010 at 11:10 am

HANOI (AFP) – US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov on Saturday join 16 Asia-Pacific leaders at a summit in Vietnam dominated by China’s territorial disputes.


The United States and Russia will be formally invited as members of the East Asia Summit at the group’s annual gathering, in what analysts say is a blow to Chinese attempts to diminish US influence in the region.


Their entry into the EAS, which elevates its diplomatic heft, comes despite Chinese attempts to promote another grouping — which does not include the US — as the region’s premier forum for regional cooperation.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is greeted by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak in Hanoi Oct. 30. AFP

US membership is seen as part of its strategic return to Southeast Asia to balance China’s growing influence in the region, where Beijing’s more aggressive stance on territorial disputes has unnerved its smaller neighbours.


Clinton, in a speech on Asia-Pacific relations made in Honolulu earlier this week, downplayed suggestions the US is duelling with China for influence.


“There are some in both countries who believe that China’s interests and ours are fundamentally at odds. They apply a zero-sum calculation to our relationship. So whenever one of us succeeds, the other must fail,” she said.


“But that is not our view.”


Nevertheless, China has been irritated by Washington wading into the issue of its claim over the resource-rich South China Sea, where several Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries are also claimants.


Clinton said in July that resolving disputes over the strategic area is “pivotal” to regional stability and offered to negotiate a settlement.


On the eve of the Hanoi summit, China hit out at Clinton’s remarks that other disputed islands in the East China Sea, the flashpoint for a serious feud with Japan, fall within the scope of the US-Japan security alliance.


“The Chinese government and people will never accept any word or deed that includes the Diaoyu islands within the scope of the US-Japan Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security,” foreign ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said.


The disputed islands — called Diaoyu in China and Senkaku in Japan — have been at the centre of a deepening row between Beijing and Tokyo which erupted again in Hanoi, evaporating hopes for talks between their leaders.


Japanese Foreign Minister Seiji Maehara met his Chinese counterpart Friday and said they had agreed to improve ties. Japan’s delegation announced direct talks between the leaders, but then retracted the statement.


China’s assistant foreign affairs minister, Hu Zhengyue, then issued a statement using extremely strong terms to condemn Japan.


“Japanese diplomatic authorities have partnered with other nations and stepped up the heat on the Diaoyu island issue,” he said.


He said Japanese comments had “violated China’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.”


“The Japanese moves, which is clear for everyone to see, have ruined the needed atmosphere for a meeting between the two leaders. Japan should take full responsibility for the result.”


Japanese Premier Naoto Kan’s spokesman, Noriyuki Shikata, said there was no reason for “heightened tensions… between the two countries” and that Japan stood ready to “engage in dialogue.”


The neighbours have been feuding since the September 8 arrest of a Chinese trawler captain after a collision with Japanese coastguard vessels near the disputed East China Sea island chain.


The United States called on China and ally Japan to ease tensions.


“We want China and Japan to sit down, to have dialogue and work through the issues,” State Department spokesman Philip Crowley told reporters in Washington.


“We would hope that both countries will take affirmative steps to de-escalate tensions around this issue and that will create the conditions for a meaningful dialogue.”


The East Asia Summit is a forum for dialogue on strategic, political and economic issues involving the 10-member Southeast Asian bloc as well as Australia, China, India, Japan, South Korea and New Zealand.

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Source: SGGP

Clinton weighs into disputes as Japan-China row roils summit

In Uncategorized on October 30, 2010 at 10:10 am

HANOI, Oct 30, 2010 (AFP) – US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Saturday joined an Asia-Pacific summit where she weighed into the issue of maritime disputes, which have triggered a serious rift between China and Japan.


Hopes that Asia’s big powers would begin to heal their two-month feud, centred on resource-rich East China Sea islands, dominated the talks in Vietnam’s capital where the row erupted again on Friday.

ASEAN Secretary General Surin Pitsuwan (L), US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (2nd L), Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong (2nd R) and New Zealand Prime Minister John Key talk before a family photo on the sidelines of the 17th summit of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations in Hanoi on October 30, 2010. AFP

On a day of conflicting messages Japan initially said their foreign ministers had made a promising start with an agreement to improve ties, but China then angrily accused its rival of making false statements.


Hopes for a formal meeting between Japan’s Prime Minister Naoto Kan and Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao evaporated, but the pair held brief discussions on the East Asia Summit sidelines Saturday, Japan said.


“They will continue making efforts on promoting a strategic, mutually beneficial relationship,” Japan’s deputy chief cabinet secretary Tetsuro Fukuyama told reporters.


“They also said that they will have an opportunity to talk longer in future,” he said. “They shared an understanding that it was disappointing the bilateral summit did not take place this time.”


Japan and China have been feuding since the September 8 arrest of a Chinese trawler captain after a collision with Japanese coastguard vessels near the disputed East China Sea island chain.


China had on Friday also hit out at Clinton’s remarks this week that the islands, known as the Diaoyus in China and Senkakus in Japan, fall within the scope of the US-Japan security alliance.


“The Chinese government and people will never accept any word or deed that includes the Diaoyu Islands within the scope of the US-Japan Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said.


However, Clinton told the summit Saturday that maritime rows should be settled by international law, in defiance of China’s call to handle them directly with its neighbours.


“The United States has a national interest in the freedom of navigation and unimpeded lawful commerce,” she said, repeating a US stand in the presence of China’s premier Wen.


“And when disputes arise over maritime territory, we are committed to resolving them peacefully based on customary international law.”


But she also sounded a softer note, saying she was encouraged by China’s steps to enter into discussions with the Southeast Asian bloc about a legally enforceable code of conduct on South China Sea disputes where some have claims.


Clinton also said she had “assurances” from her Chinese counterpart Yang Jiechi on China’s policy toward exports of rare earth minerals, which Beijing has been accused of restricting.


The East Asia Summit is a forum for dialogue on strategic, political and economic issues involving the 10-member Southeast Asian bloc as well as Australia, China, India, Japan, South Korea and New Zealand.


The meeting was also expected to tackle the issue of “currency wars” and the resulting heavy capital inflows that risk destabilising emerging Asian economies.


The Asian Development Bank chief warned in Hanoi on Saturday that emerging economies must carefully manage the inflow of hot money, and avoid remedies that could create further problems.


“Authorities are watching asset prices and exchange rates carefully, with several beginning to use well-targeted capital controls to limit speculation,” said Haruhiko Kuroda.


“Care must be taken, however, not to create distortions.”


The United States and Russia were to be formally invited to join the 16 members of the East Asia Summit at its annual gathering, in what analysts say is a blow to Chinese attempts to diminish US influence in the region.


US membership is seen as part of its strategic return to Southeast Asia to balance China’s growing influence in the region, where Beijing’s more aggressive stance in recent times has unnerved its smaller neighbours.

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Source: SGGP