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Posts Tagged ‘technology’

7th Int’l Young Innovation Exhibition on Science and Technology opens

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 2:27 pm




7th Int’l Young Innovation Exhibition on Science and Technology opens


QĐND – Thursday, December 16, 2010, 21:4 (GMT+7)

The seventh the 7th International Contest and Exhibition for Young Innovators opened in Hanoi on December 16.


The event was organised by the Vietnam Union of Science and Technology Association (VUSTA), the Ministries of Finance, Public Security and Foreign Trade and the Vietnam Innovation Fund of Science and Technology (VIFOTEC). It attracted representatives from the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), the Japan Institute of Invention and Innovation and delegates from Japan, Thailand, Malaysia, Hong Kong (China), Taiwan (China) and Vietnam.


More than 400 contestants who are adolescents and young people at the age of 6-19 from 22 countries and territories attended the contest and exhibition. Vietnam is represented by more than 100 students from 25 provinces and cities with 89 projects and products, many of which have been already applied widely and proved their usefulness.


They competed in five fields of learning aids, software, children toys and entertainment tools, environmental protection solutions and energy saving measures.


The exhibition is held at the Hanoi Friendship Palace on December 16-18.


Source: VOV


Source: QDND

First hospital in Vietnam uses SIPV technology

In Uncategorized on October 13, 2010 at 7:55 am

Despite regularly scheduled blackouts in central Vietnam, General Hospital in the central province of Quang Nam has maintained power by using a device that integrates Smart Integrating PV Technology (SIPV). The hospital is the first one in the country to employ the new technology.

The equipment in the hospital (Photo: SGGP)

SIPV is a complete solution for grid-connected establishments that generates energy from renewable sources and does not waste any. It is very efficient in its usage of PV and other renewable energy sources, is especially useful in the case of blackout and guards against erratic fluctuations in the grid power supply as well.


Moreover, the new technology not only allows solar electricity produced to feed the grid, but also guarantees a sustainable local power supply at low prices.


The trend to use grid-connected renewable energy sources started in 2008; the Solarlab-Institute of Physics, Ho Chi Minh City Academy of Science and Technology conducted a pilot plan in the city that year.


However, Vietnam has not allowed electricity produced by private companies to integrate into the nation’s grid; the Solarlab had to develop SIPV technology, which produces one-way electricity, to supply to the Vietnam Electricity (EVN) at a low cost.


The hospital had a chance to use the new technology after a meeting between Dr. Pham Hong Yen, hospital’s director and Trinh Quang Dung of Solarlab. The Ministry of Science and Technology agreed to pay 50 percent and the HCMC Institute of Physics supported 25 percent in order to bring the new technology to the hospital.


Although the project has a small scale, its role is very important because domestic companies make all the equipment involved. The solar electricity industry is expanding around the world. It has several advantages over other energy sources such as it is endless, clean, and produces no noise or negative environmental impacts.


The government should therefore pay more attention to the technology. It should work out a law for it in particular and for recyclable energies in general.

Source: SGGP

Blatter: goal-line technology talks, N.Korea probe

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2010 at 11:22 am

The controversial issue of goal-line technology will be discussed at a meeting of the International Football Association Board in October, FIFA president Sepp Blatter said Wednesday.


During the World Cup in South Africa, Blatter indicated it would be tabled at a meeting of football’s rulers in Wales in July, but that never happened.


“At this meeting (in October), we will bring the point of goal-line technology. It is now on the agenda,” he said in Singapore where he is attending the Youth Olympic Games.


Goal-line technology was forced back onto FIFA’s agenda after England’s Frank Lampard had a goal disallowed in South Africa, despite replays showing the ball clearly crossed the line.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter has said the world football authority is set to discuss the controversial issue of goal-line technology at a meeting of the International Football Association Board in October

FIFA have previously rebuffed all demands to use video technology to resolve contentious refereeing decisions, despite it being successfully implemented in other sports such as tennis, cricket and rugby union.


Their rationale has been that it would disrupt the free-flowing movement of the game.


But with international pressure growing, Blatter has softened his stance, and said Wednesday that the technology could be allowed providing it was reliable.


“My personal opinion on goal technology has never changed,” he said.


“I have said if we have an accurate and simple system then we will implement but so far we have not had a simple, nor an accurate system.”


Blatter also took the opportunity to demand answers from North Korea after reports that its World Cup squad was publicly humiliated and coach Kim Jong-Hun sentenced to hard labour.


The world football governing body this week opened an investigation and sent a letter to the North Korean football authorities in relation to the allegations.


It followed new, unspecified, evidence brought to its attention by Chung Mong-Joon, the powerful South Korean former chairman of Hyundai, who is also the president of the South Korean Football Association.


The showing of live games in the impoverished communist state had been banned to avoid national embarrassment, but after the Brazil game which North Korea lost 2-1, state television made the Portugal match its first live sports broadcast ever.


They could not have picked a worse game, with Portugal’s hail of goals leaving the commentator speechless and they eventually conceded the match 7-0.


According to Radio Free Asia, on their return team members were made to stand on a stage at the People’s Palace of Culture in the capital Pyongyang and were subjected to “ideological criticism” for six hours.


The players were apparently forced to criticise coach Kim, who was punished for “betraying” Kim Jong-Un — one of Supreme Leader Kim Jong-Il’s sons and heir apparent.


He was reportedly expelled from the Workers’ Party of Korea and sentenced to hard labour on a building site.


Blatter has also defended the scheduling of international matches, telling critics to stop making so much “noise”.

Virtually all European nations will be in action on Wednesday, with England facing Hungary and France against Norway just a month after the end of the World Cup.

Several club managers and players have made it clear they are not happy, concerned at the impact it will have on their preparations with the new season getting under way on Saturday.

Source: SGGP

First hospital in Vietnam uses SIPV technology

In Uncategorized on July 30, 2010 at 11:18 am

Despite regularly scheduled blackouts in central Vietnam, General Hospital in the central province of Quang Nam has maintained power by using a device that integrates Smart Integrating PV Technology (SIPV). The hospital is the first one in the country to employ the new technology.

The equipment in the hospital (Photo: SGGP)

SIPV is a complete solution for grid-connected establishments that generates energy from renewable sources and does not waste any. It is very efficient in its usage of PV and other renewable energy sources, is especially useful in the case of blackout and guards against erratic fluctuations in the grid power supply as well.


Moreover, the new technology not only allows solar electricity produced to feed the grid, but also guarantees a sustainable local power supply at low prices.


The trend to use grid-connected renewable energy sources started in 2008; the Solarlab-Institute of Physics, Ho Chi Minh City Academy of Science and Technology conducted a pilot plan in the city that year.


However, Vietnam has not allowed electricity produced by private companies to integrate into the nation’s grid; the Solarlab had to develop SIPV technology, which produces one-way electricity, to supply to the Vietnam Electricity (EVN) at a low cost.


The hospital had a chance to use the new technology after a meeting between Dr. Pham Hong Yen, hospital’s director and Trinh Quang Dung of Solarlab. The Ministry of Science and Technology agreed to pay 50 percent and the HCMC Institute of Physics supported 25 percent in order to bring the new technology to the hospital.


Although the project has a small scale, its role is very important because domestic companies make all the equipment involved. The solar electricity industry is expanding around the world. It has several advantages over other energy sources such as it is endless, clean, and produces no noise or negative environmental impacts.


The government should therefore pay more attention to the technology. It should work out a law for it in particular and for recyclable energies in general.

Source: SGGP

Ho Chi Minh City to host entertainment technology exhibition

In Uncategorized on July 20, 2010 at 3:21 pm




Ho Chi Minh City to host entertainment technology exhibition


QĐND – Sunday, July 18, 2010, 21:2 (GMT+7)

Ho Chi Minh City will host the international PALME exhibition from July 22 to 27, making it the first of its kind to be held in the country.


PALME is the largest annual event of the entertainment technology industry in Southeast Asia as it dedicates to professional sound, light, music, audio visual and systems integration.


Rosalind Ng, Executive Director of the Asian IIR Exhibitions Company, commented that the participation of over 200 companies from 20 countries and territories in the first-ever PALME in Vietnam proved that the Southeast Asian country is a “fertile land” for foreign businesses.


She said she hoped this PALME will offer chances for Vietnamese businesses to access advanced technologies and equipment in the entertainment industry.


PALME has been held in the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore.


Source: tuoitrenews


Source: QDND

Italy funds technology transfer project

In Uncategorized on June 18, 2010 at 8:37 am




Italy funds technology transfer project


QĐND – Thursday, June 17, 2010, 20:57 (GMT+7)

Opportunities are open for Vietnamese small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to receive technology transferred from Italian partners in a 3 million Euro project funded by the Italian Government. 


The project, co-sponsored by the Enterprise Development Department under the Ministry of Planning and Investment and the UN Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), kick-started in 2009 to tap potential of enterprises from the two countries. 


Italian Ambassador Andrea Perugini said at a workshop in Hanoi on June 16 that Italian business circles have advantages in product designing and quality, as well as marketing skills and mastery of technology in various industries. Meanwhile, Vietnamese enterprises can offer abundant workforce and low-cost labour, he pointed out. 


These elements have revealed a prospect of win-win cooperation, said the Italian diplomat, adding that Italian enterprises would take this opportunity to effectively transfer technology and experiences to Vietnamese partners. 


Source: VOV


 


Source: QDND

Russia to provide technology for Ninh Thuan nuclear power plant

In Uncategorized on May 28, 2010 at 1:09 pm

The Vietnamese Government has chosen Russia as the foreign partner to provide technology for Vietnam’s first nuclear power plant project in Ninh Thuan Province, Dr. Vuong Huu Tan, director of the Vietnam Institute for Nuclear Energy Institute, has said.


The decision to go ahead with the project was based on longstanding assessments made by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that the Russian nuclear power technology as safe, Mr. Tan explained.


He was speaking Thursday at a bi-annual international nuclear power exhibition in Hanoi on May 27-29.

Visitors look at an artist’s impression of the nuclear power plant in Ninh Thuan Province, displayed at an exhibition in Hanoi May 27-29 (Photo: VNExpress)

The Russian technology, with a capacity of 2,000 MWh, has been offered at a price of US$8 billion, equivalent to that of other countries’ technologies of the same kind, he said.


Besides Ninh Thuan Province, Vietnam will select 8-10 other locations to build more nuclear power plants from now to 2030, he added.


The Government will ask for opinions from the National Assembly about those additional nuclear power projects, Mr. Tan said.


Ministry of Education and Training has signed an agreement with the Russian Nuclear Power Group on human resource training for Vietnam’s nuclear power sector, he said.


Under the agreement, Russian nuclear engineers will train about 40 Electricity of Vietnam Group staff members this year, he said, adding that the Ministry of Science and Technology will also arrange for training some of its staff members.


“Many preparations are being made so that the construction of the Ninh Thuan 1 nuclear power plant will start in 2014 and the first turbine will be put into operation in 2020,” Mr. Tan said.

Source: SGGP

UN experts say NKorea is exporting nuke technology

In Uncategorized on May 28, 2010 at 5:11 am

U.N. experts say North Korea is exporting nuclear and ballistic missile technology and using intermediaries, shell companies and overseas criminal networks to circumvent U.N. sanctions.

A North Korean soldier waits on the river banks of Sinuiju in North Korea as seen from along the Yalu river near Dandong in northeastern China’s Liaoning province, Friday, May 28, 2010

The seven-member panel monitoring sanctions against North Korea said in a report obtained by The Associated Press late Thursday that its research indicates that Pyongyang is involved in banned nuclear and ballistic activities in Iran, Syria and Myanmar. It called for further study of these suspected activities and urged all countries to try to prevent them.


The 47-page report and a lengthy annex document sanctions violations reported by U.N. member states, including four cases involving arms exports and two seizures of luxury goods. The report also details the broad range of techniques that North Korea is using to try to evade sanctions imposed after its nuclear tests.

Source: SGGP

Vietnamese technology wins UN environment award

In Uncategorized on May 11, 2010 at 4:53 pm




Vietnamese technology wins UN environment award


QĐND – Tuesday, May 11, 2010, 22:29 (GMT+7)

A new Vietnamese technology of using rice husks to replace fossil fuels has won the 2009 Energy Globe Awards (EGW)-sponsored by the UN Environmental Programme (UNEP).


The technology, with ceramic kilns fed by rice husks, was put into operation in the Mekong Delta province of Dong Thap in 2009 by the Centre for the Research and Development of Energy Savings (ENERTEAM) under the Ministry of Science and Technology.


The ENERTEAM said the project has provided ‘green brick’ technology for the Mekong Delta, home to thousands of traditional ceramic kilns at risk of being closed for using old technology that seriously pollutes the environment.


The application of this new technology will also help businesses increase their output, improve the quality of their products and ensure stable jobs for their workers.
Producing ceramics is a traditional craft which provides many people in Mekong Delta provinces with good incomes.


The project was part of a showcase programme initiated by the Asia-Pacific Forum on Environment and Development (APFED).


The award ceremony will take place in Rwanda on June 3.


In 2006, Vietnam also won an EGW prize for another bio fuel project.


Source: VNA/VOV


Source: QDND

How U.S. weapons technology is finding its way to Iran

In Uncategorized on April 16, 2010 at 10:27 am

The shadow war between the U.S. and Iran was briefly visible this week at an extradition hearing in a Paris courtroom, where an Iranian engineer was answering U.S. charges that he’d illegally shipped U.S. technology to Iran .


French authorities detained Majid Kakavand , 37, at the request of the U.S., as he stepped off a plane last year. On Wednesday he got a big boost when a French state prosecutor unexpectedly argued that the technology he allegedly shipped through his global procurement network had no military application.


Whether France extradites Kakavand or doesn’t, as now seems more likely, this was the latest round in an escalating contest over what U.S. officials say is Tehran’s voracious appetite for technology to feed its nuclear, missile and other military programs.


While diplomats dither about imposing new U.N. sanctions on Tehran because of its suspected nuclear weapons program, the real struggle over Iran’s capabilities is taking place in courtrooms and intelligence centers, via sting operations, front companies and falsified shipping documents.


In the last year alone, U.S. law enforcement and customs officials have uncovered at least 16 cases in which Iranians or their agents allegedly tried to buy night vision equipment, military aircraft parts, vacuum pumps with nuclear uses, and a lot more.


The U.S. counterattack has gone well beyond U.S. borders, provoking controversy and complications.


Suspects have been arrested and extradited from the country of Georgia and, just three weeks ago, from Hong Kong . A former Iranian ambassador to Jordan , nabbed in a U.S. sting operation, is fighting extradition from the United Kingdom .


Iran is fighting back. In December, state media released a list of 11 Iranians it said were being improperly detained, either in the U.S. or in other countries at U.S. request.


Kakavand was on the list, as was Nasrollah Tajik, the former ambassador to Jordan . Also listed was Shahram Amiri , an Iranian nuclear scientist who disappeared in Saudi Arabia last year and was reported by ABC News to have defected to the U.S.


Manoucher Mottaki, the foreign minister, called Kakavand earlier this month to offer encouragement. The call fueled suspicions that if France releases him, Iran will free Clotilde Reiss , a young Frenchwoman who was detained after Iran’s disputed July 2009 elections.


U.S. officials say Iran has also responded by trying better to cover its tracks.


Proliferation networks “are becoming increasingly more sophisticated — laying out a smoke trail, really,” said special agent Clark Settles , the chief of counter-proliferation investigations at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement .


“They’ve added more middlemen” to hide the true destinations of shipments of U.S. technology, and have become more proficient at forging documents and falsifying export licenses, Settles said.


The U.S. effort also has gotten a lot more aggressive, said David Albright , the president of the private Institute for Science and International Security and the author of a new book on illicit nuclear trade.


“I think it’s hurting them. You can see in some cases, they get pretty desperate,” Albright said.


Iran is dependent on foreign technology to expand its uranium enrichment efforts, which U.S. and European intelligence agencies say is aimed at acquiring enough fissile material to make a nuclear weapon.


“They want to get 20,000 centrifuges” for enrichment, Albright said. “They’re constantly needing to go out and buy things. . . . You hurt them on the build-up.”


Iran is using U.S. technology for non-nuclear applications, as well to harm Americans, law enforcement officials and analysts say.

Sophisticated roadside bombs, thought to have been assembled in Iran , have been discovered in Iraq and Afghanistan containing electronics whose serial numbers trace them back to the U.S., they say.

At ISIS’ Washington offices, Albright pointed to a picture of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad touring one of Iran’s nuclear sites. Also in the photograph is a pressure transducer, which can be used to measure pressure inside a centrifuge that’s enriching uranium — almost certainly of U.S. origin.

Steven Pelak , a senior Justice Department official said recently that there was a more than 30 percent increase in criminal defendants between late 2006 and late 2007. Most cases are focused on Iran and China , said Pelak, who coordinates an inter-agency export enforcement task force. He said there are more than a dozen open investigations into illegal proliferation networks.

Despite a near-total U.S. ban on trade with Iran and significant restrictions in Europe , a lot apparently gets through.

“Cases lead to other cases. Every time we’ve taken down one of these networks, we literally found hundreds of leads,” said Settles, the ICE special agent.

The U.S. last year acquired an extensive “electronic Rolodex” as part of a plea bargain with the owner of a Dutch aviation services firm, who with his son was charged with transshipping U.S. goods to Iran . Robert Kraaipoel and his son came voluntarily to the U.S., because after charges against them were made public, no Western banks would hold their money, throttling business.

U.S. customs agents also have lured Iranian front men to third countries that have extradition treaties with the U.S., and later brought them to U.S. jails.

Pelak disputed that the U.S. government is trying to enforce its laws overseas. He said suspects are using U.S. financial institutions, buying American technology and often causing U.S. companies to file false export certificates, unwittingly he said.

Kakavand was supposed to be a case in point. Documents filed in U.S. District Court in Northern California charge that he and his associates set up a firm, Evertop Services, in Malaysia , and used it to buy at least 30 shipments of U.S.-made electronics worth more than $1 million . Once in Malaysia , they were shipped to Iran via Iran Air , the state-controlled airline.

E-mails from Evertop show the company’s customers included Iran Electronics Industry and Iran Communications Industries , entities that supply Iran’s military.

Kakavand’s attorney in Paris , Diane Francois , told McClatchy that the Iranian dealt with “no arms or dual-use (items), period.” Because he didn’t break French law, he shouldn’t be extradited, she said.

A federal law enforcement official, speaking on condition of anonymity because the case is ongoing, said the real issue is that the two Iranian entities were designated for their involvement in Iran’s nuclear missile programs by the U.S. and one, IEI, by the European Union .

“These facilities don’t make toys,” he said.

The case helped prompt Malaysia , long seen as transit point for goods to Iran , to adopt an export control law in time for President Barack Obama‘s nuclear security summit this week.

A ruling on Kakavand’s extradition is expected May 5 .

Source: SGGP