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Posts Tagged ‘tropical’

Tropical depression to bring rains

In Uncategorized on August 19, 2010 at 11:23 am

Affected by a tropical low pressure zone, which was on the northern part of Truong Sa (Spratly) Islands as of 7am August 19, the waters off the central coastal area between Danang City and Binh Thuan Province will become rough with rains, the national weather bureau said Thursday.

A tropical low pressure zone will bring medium to heavy rains to the central and southern central regions

In the mainland, central and southern central provinces will see medium to heavy rains, some places might experience thunderstorms, said the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center.


The center said residents should keep watch of tornados and strong winds during the thunderstorms.


The tropical depression will slowly move westward at a speed of 5-10 kilometers an hour in the next 24 hours, the center forecasted.

Source: SGGP

Tropical depression halts drilling at Gulf well

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2010 at 11:21 am

Drilling the final feet of a relief well intended to permanently plug the busted BP oil well deep below the Gulf of Mexico will have to wait two to three days as a strengthening tropical depression bears down on the site.


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.

– In this Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2010 picture, a support vessel, foreground center, and others surround the Helix Q4000, background center, used to perform the static kill operation, at the site of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana

Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.


Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation because southeast Louisiana is the “geographic and psychological ‘center of gravity'” for the cases.

Source: SGGP

Tropical depression halts drilling at Gulf well

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2010 at 11:20 am

Drilling the final feet of a relief well intended to permanently plug the busted BP oil well deep below the Gulf of Mexico will have to wait two to three days as a strengthening tropical depression bears down on the site.


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.

– In this Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2010 picture, a support vessel, foreground center, and others surround the Helix Q4000, background center, used to perform the static kill operation, at the site of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana

Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation


BP and Coast Guard officials had already decided to stop drilling earlier Tuesday, before forecasters at the National Hurricane Center named the storm a depression. A tropical storm warning was issued for much of the Gulf Coast affected by the oil spill, from Destin, Fla., to Intracoastal City, La.


The center of the storm was located off Florida, hundreds of miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It was moving northwest and was expected to strengthen slowly and become a tropical storm on Wednesday.


Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the government’s point man on the spill, said the last steps will have to wait for ending any threat from the well that spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil over three months before a temporary cap sealed it in mid-July.


Crews will pop in a temporary plug to safeguard what they’ve drilled so far, but they won’t send workers back to land. They have about 30 to 50 feet left to drill.


The relief well is meant to allow BP PLC to pump mud and cement into the broken one from deep underground for a so-called bottom kill, a permanent seal that would complement a plug injected into the top of the well last week.


Allen has insisted for days that BP go ahead with the bottom kill, even though the top plug appeared to be holding. On Tuesday, though, he said testing still needs to be done on the well before a final decision is made.


“I’m not sure we know that … I don’t want to prejudge whether we are going to do it or not going to do it. It will be conditions-based.”


He later assigned a “very low probability” to the bottom kill not being done, but then said: “We will let everybody know” if that changes.


BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said it’s “really a possibility” that cement engineers pumped in through the top went down into the reservoir, came back up and plugged the annulus, which is between the inner piping and the outer casing.


Allen also said officials were removing some boom that had been put out to catch oil in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. He said the boom will be put it in storage and available for future use if necessary.


The delay from the storm came on the same day that anglers and tourism operators got some good news: Federal authorities announced that about 5,000 square miles of Gulf along Florida’s Panhandle was reopened for commercial and recreational fishing.


Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, said the expanse from east of Pensacola to Cape San Blas and extending south into the open Gulf was safe for fishing. No oil has been observed in those waters since July 3, though testing will continue.


The spill started with an April 20 explosion that sank the BP-leased drilling rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 workers.


More than 300 lawsuits filed in the aftermath against BP and other companies will be handled by a federal judge in New Orleans, a judicial panel said Tuesday.


An order issued Tuesday by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said 77 cases plus more than 200 potential “tag-along” actions will be transferred to U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.


The judicial panel’s order says the federal court based in New Orleans is the best place for the litigation because southeast Louisiana is the “geographic and psychological ‘center of gravity'” for the cases.

Source: SGGP

East Sea choppy from coming tropical depression

In Uncategorized on August 7, 2010 at 11:22 am

A tropical low-pressure system will leave the Philippines’ waters, heading for the East Sea in the next one or two days, said the national weather bureau. It is then expected to move westward at a speed of 15-20 kilometers an hour.


The northern part of the East Sea will be rough and experience rainstorms and strong winds, the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center has forecasted.


Affected by the depression, there are currently thunderclouds over the East Sea, which are slowly heading towards to the waters off from Khanh Hoa to Ca Mau, causing showers and thunderstorms for those southern provinces.

Source: SGGP

Tropical storm set to delay Gulf oil fix

In Uncategorized on July 23, 2010 at 3:17 am

NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana (AFP) – A tropical storm barreling towards the Gulf of Mexico has forced the evacuation of ships, personnel and a key drilling rig, prolonging the region’s three-month environmental and economic nightmare.


“Due to the risk that Tropical Storm Bonnie poses to the safety of the nearly 2,000 people responding to the BP oil spill at the well site, many of the vessels and rigs will be preparing to move out of harm’s way beginning tonight,” US oil spill chief Admiral Thad Allen announced.


“This includes the rig drilling the relief well that will ultimately kill the well, as well as other vessels needed for containment. Some of the vessels may be able to remain on site, but we will err on the side of safety.”


Officials have said the evacuation of the drilling rig will lead to a delay of up to 12 days in the final operation to plug BP’s runaway well, but Allen sought to play down those concerns.


“While these actions may delay the effort to kill the well for several days, the safety of the individuals at the well site is our highest concern,” he said.


“We are staging our skimming vessels and other assets in a manner that will allow us to promptly re-start oil mitigation efforts as soon as the storm passes and we can ensure the safety of our personnel.”


Allen decided the cap holding back the torrent of crude for the past week would stay on, providing some respite for those in the Gulf region struggling to cope with the huge economic impact of the disaster.

NASA handout image shows the oil slick (centre) caused by the BP Gulf of Mexico oil spill. AFP/NASA file

There had been fears the cap would have to be opened up or even removed because nobody would be on site to monitor any pressure anomalies in the well or oil seepage on the sea floor.


But Allen said he had ordered BP to make sure their remotely operated vehicles (ROV’s) which do the crucial monitoring for oil leaks and other anomalies are the last to leave when the storm arrives.


“As I stated earlier today, I have directed BP to continue with the well shut in procedure while the work to kill the well is temporarily suspended,” he said.


“I have also directed BP to take measures to ensure the vessels operating the ROV’s are the last to leave, and the first to return in order to maximize monitoring of the well.”


Latest forecasts show the storm hitting the area on Saturday morning and likely to pass by early Sunday.


Crucial work to concrete in the casing on the relief well will now be postponed until the giant drilling rig can return.


After that sets, a process expected to take up to a week, officials hope to perform a “static kill” to plug the well by injecting heavy drilling mud and cement through the cap at the top.


The final operation to cement the reservoir once and for all through the relief well would be expected five to seven days after that.


The evacuation was a huge blow for local residents who already see efforts to choke off the well as too little too late, with hundreds of miles of coastline already fouled.


The five US states along the Gulf of Mexico could lose 22.7 billion dollars in tourist revenue over the next three years because of the spill, a study showed Thursday.


A vast swath of the Gulf has also been closed to commercial and sport fishing since the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon rig sank on April 22, two days after an explosion that killed 11 workers.


But US officials reopened Thursday one third of those fishing grounds after no oil was seen in the area for 30 days and tests revealed the fish there were not being polluted.


Oil industry jobs in the region were also hit by President Barack Obama’s decision to impose a moratorium on new deepsea drilling — a move fiercely opposed by local leaders.


If an upper estimate of over four million barrels is confirmed, what is considered one of America’s worst ever environmental disasters would also be the biggest accidental oil spill ever.


After three frustrating months marked by several botched attempts to contain the leak, BP finally sealed the well with its new cap last Thursday and no significant amount of oil has entered the sea since.

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Source: SGGP

Northern region braces for season’s next tropical storm

In Uncategorized on July 21, 2010 at 3:16 pm




Northern region braces for season’s next tropical storm


QĐND – Wednesday, July 21, 2010, 21:1 (GMT+7)

The National Hydro-Meteorological Forecast Centre on July 20 said the second storm of this year, Chanthu, would be 210 km northeast of China’s Hainan Island at 7pm on July 21.


The eye of the storm would be positioned over Hainan, with wind gusts near the eye of the storm reaching up to 117 kph and the dangerous wind gust area spread over 250 km.


The storm was forecast to travel northwest at between 10 -15 kph towards China ’s Guangdong province in the next two days.


The storm would bring strong winds and rough seas to the Hoang Sa (Paracel) Archipelago and heavy rain-fall across the country.


Between the next 48 and 72 hours, the storm would continue moving northwest and weaken into a tropical low.


The Ministry of Health on July 20 sent an urgent message to health departments in coastal areas from central Da Nang city to Khanh Hoa province to promptly evacuate patients at storm-prone hospitals and clinics, especially in low-land areas to safety.
Hospitals and health clinics were asked to prepare for emergencies and free of charge first aid provision.


Ministry agencies have been asked to prepare medicine, disinfectants and other medical facilities to support localities to deal with the storm.


Source: VNA


Source: QDND

Conson weakens into tropical depression

In Uncategorized on July 20, 2010 at 3:17 pm




Conson weakens into tropical depression


QĐND – Sunday, July 18, 2010, 21:2 (GMT+7)

According to the National Hydro-Meteorological Forecasting Centre, storm Conson weakened into tropical low pressure system after hitting Hai Phong and Thai Binh provinces on the evening of July 17.


On the early morning of July 18, the centre of the low pressure was situated at 21.4 0 N latitude and 105.4 0 E longitude, at the Red River Delta. The strongest winds near the low pressure centre reduced to category 6 (less than 39 km per hour)


The low pressure will move northwest at a speed of 15-20 km per hour in the next 12 hours and then continue to move deeper inland and weaken.


Due to the impact of low pressure circulation, there will be heavy rains and thunderstorm in northern provinces. Mountainous areas should take precautions against possible flash floods and landslides.


Source: VOV


Source: QDND

Tropical storm Conson injures three people

In Uncategorized on July 20, 2010 at 3:16 pm




Tropical storm Conson injures three people


QĐND – Sunday, July 18, 2010, 21:3 (GMT+7)

By 6 a.m on July 18, three people were injured and 11 others remained missing after tropical storm Conson (named after a well-known historical site in Vietnam) hit the nation’s northern and central coastal provinces on July 17.


At a meeting in Hanoi on the morning of July 18, the Central Steering Committee for Flood and Storm Prevention and Control cited localities’ initial report as saying that the storm, the first to hit Vietnam this year, unroofed 303 houses and damaged 27 vessels and swept away 37 others.


The storm brought strong winds and heavy rains to the northern province of Quang Ninh southwards.


Localities said they have not been able to calculate damage cost.


The committee instructed localities to continue searching near the Hoang Sa (Paracel) archipelago for six missing fishermen and their vessels from the central province of Quang Ngai. Meanwhile, rescue teams continued dredging up sunken ships.


Source: VNA


Source: QDND

New tropical depression heading towards East Sea

In Uncategorized on July 20, 2010 at 11:30 am

A new tropical low-pressure system is set to move from the waters off the Philippines and is to the East Sea by the evening of July 18, according to the National Hydro Meteorological Forecasting Center.


As of 7am this morning, the tropical depression laid centered 16 degrees north latitude and 122 degrees east longitudes, east of Luzon Island. Strongest winds near the storm’s center reached 39-49 kilometers an hour.
 
In the next 24 hours, the system will move west-northwestward at a speed of 15 kilometers and is likely to intensify.


Affected by the tropical depression, the eastern East Sea will be rough with winds up to 61 kilometers an hour.

Source: SGGP

Tropical storm to land in the north

In Uncategorized on July 16, 2010 at 4:46 pm




Tropical storm to land in the north


QĐND – Friday, July 16, 2010, 21:22 (GMT+7)

The first tropical storm of the year is expected to bring high winds and rain to northern Vietnam, warns the National Hydro-meteorological Forecasting Centre.


Storm Con Son (named after a well-known historical site in Vietnam), is forecast to be off the coast from Quang Ninh province to Hai Phong City – 21.3 degrees north and 107.9 degrees east – at 1pm on July 17.


Wind gusts of up to 102kmph are likely.


Heavy rain will fall in northern provinces, especially the northern highlands, says the centre.


Provinces such as Ha Giang, Lao Cai and Lang Son have been alerted to possible flash floods and landslides.


The eye of the storm was at 16.5 degrees north and 113.9 degrees east, about 190km from the Hoang Sa (Paracel) Archipelago in the East Sea, at 1pm on July 15.


It was expected to generate rough seas in northern waters with waves of between 5-7 metres.


The Border Guard High Command reports that its personnel have been in contact with almost 52,000 vessels and 240,000 fishermen.


But 426 fishermen aboard 33 ships from central Quang Ngai province have not sought safety.


The guards have been unable to contact three vessels from Quang Nam province.


The Central Storm, Flood Prevention and Rescue Board met yesterday and Agriculture and Rural Development Minister Cao Duc Phat ordered the securing of tourist craft and port cranes to avoid serious damage.


The minister also asked Quang Ngai and Quang Nam provinces to do what ever possible to contact the three ships of Quang Nam Province so the crews could find safety.


Border guards were also asked to advise the crews of the 33 vessels working in dangerous seas to sail south or ask China for shelter if necessary.


Conson is expected to travel north-west at between 10-15kmph during the next two days and hit near the border of Viet Nam and China.


But it will weaken to a tropical depression with strongest gusts of up to 61kmph.


About 10-12 storms were forecast to hit the East Sea this year, two to three less than previous years, said the National Hydro-meteorological Forecasting Centre’s medium and long-term forecast office meteorologist Tran Thi Chuc.


But the number of storms affecting Viet Nam directly would be higher – 6-7 – against the average 5-6, she said.


Source: VNA


Source: QDND