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Posts Tagged ‘using’

Proportion of residents using clean water still low

In Uncategorized on November 9, 2010 at 8:51 am

Barefoot science students make tricycle using solar energy

In Uncategorized on October 13, 2010 at 7:55 am

The Da Nang Poly-technique University was abuzz with admiration for three “barefoot science” students who designed and built a tricycle using solar energy.

The group of students  and teacher stand by the new vehicle (Photo; SGGP)

Ta Ngoc Thien Binh, Huynh Kim Trang and Pham Nguyen Son of the Mechanic Department of the university, invested their own money to research and develop the new product because they felt sorry for tricycle drivers, who had to work in the scorching sun in central Vietnam.


The three barefoot science students said the biggest difficulty getting a hold of the design document. They journeyed to Ho Chi Minh City and the Mekong delta province of Can Tho to learn more about the machine.


Their efforts paid off after two months, when they finished the vehicle model with the zealous assistance of teacher Duong Viet Dung. They then had to overcome financial barriers. Upon hearing the group’s story, teachers, the Mechanic department and their families decided to help the ambitious students to make their dream come true.


The newly invented vehicle ran on June 15. The 350-kilogram tricycle, named Solar Car C4, has two seats; and is capable of achieving a maximum speed of 30 kilometers an hour. Its electrical charge lasts for 30 kilometers, but most importantly, it can utilize gas when it is out of electricity or if it is cloudy.


Its design is small, making it suitable for tourist service in the central city of Da Nang, which intends to become an environmentally friendly city.  It is also perfect for the UNESCO-recognized natural heritage site of Hoi An town, which ban vehicles with engines, said Thien Binh.


The Solar Car C4 won second prize at the competition launched in 2009 by the Communist Youth Union and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. The barefoot science students have entered their product to the “Student conduct scientific research” contest and the Competition for Creativeness of adolescents & children nationwide 2010.


The cost of Solar Car C4 is over VND80 million. The group expects a motor company to invest in it and improve aspects of its technical design to produce a fleet of solar tricycles in Da Nang.

Source: SGGP

Barefoot science students make tricycle using solar energy

In Uncategorized on August 12, 2010 at 11:20 am

The Da Nang Poly-technique University was abuzz with admiration for three “barefoot science” students who designed and built a tricycle using solar energy.

The group of students  and teacher stand by the new vehicle (Photo; SGGP)

Ta Ngoc Thien Binh, Huynh Kim Trang and Pham Nguyen Son of the Mechanic Department of the university, invested their own money to research and develop the new product because they felt sorry for tricycle drivers, who had to work in the scorching sun in central Vietnam.


The three barefoot science students said the biggest difficulty getting a hold of the design document. They journeyed to Ho Chi Minh City and the Mekong delta province of Can Tho to learn more about the machine.


Their efforts paid off after two months, when they finished the vehicle model with the zealous assistance of teacher Duong Viet Dung. They then had to overcome financial barriers. Upon hearing the group’s story, teachers, the Mechanic department and their families decided to help the ambitious students to make their dream come true.


The newly invented vehicle ran on June 15. The 350-kilogram tricycle, named Solar Car C4, has two seats; and is capable of achieving a maximum speed of 30 kilometers an hour. Its electrical charge lasts for 30 kilometers, but most importantly, it can utilize gas when it is out of electricity or if it is cloudy.


Its design is small, making it suitable for tourist service in the central city of Da Nang, which intends to become an environmentally friendly city.  It is also perfect for the UNESCO-recognized natural heritage site of Hoi An town, which ban vehicles with engines, said Thien Binh.


The Solar Car C4 won second prize at the competition launched in 2009 by the Communist Youth Union and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. The barefoot science students have entered their product to the “Student conduct scientific research” contest and the Competition for Creativeness of adolescents & children nationwide 2010.


The cost of Solar Car C4 is over VND80 million. The group expects a motor company to invest in it and improve aspects of its technical design to produce a fleet of solar tricycles in Da Nang.

Source: SGGP

Imperatives for using local raw material resources for steel-making in Vietnam

In Uncategorized on July 20, 2010 at 3:20 pm




Imperatives for using local raw material resources for steel-making in Vietnam


QĐND – Monday, July 19, 2010, 21:2 (GMT+7)


PANO – The Vietnam economy has been growing at a steady pace for the last decade or so and as it is common for any developing country the consumption of steel is linked to the GDP growth of the country. Vietnam consumed around 11.7 million tones of steel for the year 2010 and the consumption is going to increase at about 10% for the next 5 years or so. It is expected that the steel consumption will rise to about 20 million tones by 2015. As of now the major portion of the steel consumption is imported, which puts a strain on the trade deficit and hence the forex reserves of the country.

It is imperative that Vietnam produces steel based on its own raw materials, as it will help save scarce foreign exchange and prevent the trade deficit from increasing further. The trade deficit for Vietnam was about USD 12 billion for 2009. If incremental volumes of steel in future are produced from domestic raw materials, it will help to minimize increase in trade deficit and prevent the currency (i.e. Dong) from facing downward pressure. The preference to use indigenous resources will also help Vietnam reduce paying for the increased value of imported finished products compared to the exported raw materials. A domestic steel-making plant with large capacity can fulfill the domestic demand for steel and provide about 10-15% of the rest capacity for export, hence, help narrow the gap between the price of imported products and that of domestic ones.


For making steel from raw materials, only an integrated plant project can process the iron ore and coking coal. “Recently, Vietnam has to import 50% of demand for billet to produce long steel products and 90% of demand for flat products. An integrated plant uses basic materials (i.e: iron) to produce finished products with a large capacity. You may be aware that greenfield Integrated Steel plant project is very complex and difficult. Just to prove this point that there has been no successful implementation of the Integrated Steel Project in the world (outside China) in the last 12 years” Mr. Indronil Sengupta- Chief executive of South East Asia projects, Tata Steel Ltd. said.


 “In this category, Tata Steel, among the top 10 global steel makers, has proposed a project in Vietnam along with VNSTEEL and VICEM and we are confident to make serious investment to confirm our commitment to the development and expansion of steel industry,” said Mr Nghiem Xuan Da, Director of Finance & Accounting of VNSteel.


“Manufacturing per tone of steel (slab) requires 1.8 tones of iron ore and 0.8 tones of coking coal, if we were to consider the present market prices then the CIF prices for iron ore and coking coal will be about USD 466 per tone of steel, which amounts to USD 466 million per million tone of steel. Hence for a project like Tata Steel-VNSteel JV that is based on domestic raw materials, the saving will be USD 466 per tone of steel produced or USD 2.15 billion for 4.6 million tone steel capacity envisaged by the JV,” he added.


 “We are aware that the steel project using raw materials can create bad impacts on environment and the rapid exhaustion of natural resources. Besides, we have to watch out that our natural resources do not get locked-in with non-serious investors while the serious investors are being left out. Therefore, all existing projects must need to be cross-checked carefully project by project to ensure that we have the serious investors, and non -serious players should be rejected. ” Mr. Dinh Huy Tam, General Secrectary of Vietnam Steel Association commented. “Besides the non-serious players also crowd-out the serious players, who are looking at Vietnam from a distance as a prospective manufacturing base, as is happening in Vietnam, where a lot of steel projects are only on paper and nothing is happening on the ground. This makes the serious players consider that there is going to be an over-capacity in Vietnam and hence not consider it seriously.”


“In many countries, FDI proposals from only global top 10 players are considered in that particular sector to ensure that the potential investor has the technological and financial strength to implement the project and not keep the natural resources idle and locked up. For example, in Thailand, the Government invites only the top 5 players to ensure that they can select the specialized and committed investor with financial strength and state-of-art technology” he added.


“With over 100 year experience in mining and steel-making, we at Tata Steel ensure the ambition to exceed the environment law of every country where Tata Steel operates. It is our corporate ethics and culture. For example we have at least 5% of the whole land size is the surrounding green belt which is beyond the existing laws of Vietnam to minimize the impacts on environment,” said Mr. Indronil.


“Along with the commitment to environment and making effective use of natural resources, the savings as the proportion of trade deficit from Tata- VNS JV project alone will be about 18% or USD 2.15 billion out of USD 12 billion [the figure in 2009],” said Mr. Nghiem Xuan Da, Director of Finance & Accounting of VNSteel.


Hence it is imperative for a developing country like Vietnam that it encourages and speeds up these kinds of projects, which are based on domestic raw materials to save scarce foreign exchange and help the ‘Dong’ to remain a more stable currency, which is also a must for creating and attracting foreign direct investments into Vietnam. Finally, it is more important when Vietnam’s steel production is forecast to exceed the domestic demand in the next few years.


Reported by Thu Nguyen (basing on information provided by Tata)


Source: QDND

Air travelers to face fines up to VND1mil for using electronics

In Uncategorized on April 16, 2010 at 6:53 am

Aircraft passengers who are found using electronic appliances including cell phones and laptops without permission could soon face penalties of VND500,000 to VND1 million (US$53).

The Ministry of Transport has proposed the Government approve fines of up to VND1 million for passengers caught using electronic devices on flights

The fines were announced as part of a new draft on penalties for infractions related to the aviation sector, which the Ministry of Transport has submitted to the Government.


The Ministry of Justice, meanwhile, proposed that first-time offenders receive lighter penalties.


However, the Ministry of Transport said that all passengers are reminded not to use electronic appliances aboard aircraft to ensure safety.


Thus, anyone caught violating regulations should be strictly punished, the ministry said.

Source: SGGP

Doctors save bird flu patient using new method

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 9:33 am

For the first time, Vietnamese doctors have saved a patient with a life-threatening case of avian flu (A/H5N1), said the Bach Mai Hospital in Hanoi.

Nguyen Thu Thuy and her three month old child ( Photo: Thanh nien)

The patient is 25-year-old Nguyen Thu Thuy from the district of Soc Son in Hanoi. She was discharged from the Bach Mai Hospital after three weeks of intensive treatment. 


Dr. Nguyen Gia Binh, head of the Intensive Care Department, said Thuy was taken to the hospital in serious condition suffering primary viral pneumonia and multi-organ failure.


Vietnamese doctors consulted with Japanese counterparts to come up with a comprehensive treatment plan that included continuous renal replacement therapy to remove toxins in the patient’s blood, and reduce inflammation and organ damage.


The physicians’ efforts were rewarded after seven days as the woman began to improve and did not require the use of a breathing machine. After 10 days of intensive treatment, doctors said that Thuy’s organs had returned to normal functioning.


Bach Mai doctors also used other methods to help save the woman and are continuing to monitor her.


Dr. Binh said the method was first used in Japan but it is not widely implemented around the world as it is very expensive.


The Disease Control and Prevention Center (DCC) of the International Medical Center of Japan, which has a partnership with Bach Mai, sponsored the treatment process, which cost nearly VND200 million (US$10,500).


Dr. Nguyen Quoc Anh, Bach Mai Hospital’s director, said the new treatment techniques will hopefully pave the way for more successful outcomes in cases of severe or late-stage avian flu cases.


DCC Director Dr. Koichiro Kudo said the challenging case was beneficial for Vietnamese doctors as it improved their knowledge, determination and teamwork.

Source: SGGP

Doctors save bird flu patient using new method

In Uncategorized on April 5, 2010 at 9:24 am

For the first time, Vietnamese doctors have saved a patient with a life-threatening case of avian flu (A/H5N1), said the Bach Mai Hospital in Hanoi.

Nguyen Thu Thuy and her three month old child ( Photo: Thanh nien)

The patient is 25-year-old Nguyen Thu Thuy from the district of Soc Son in Hanoi. She was discharged from the Bach Mai Hospital after three weeks of intensive treatment. 


Dr. Nguyen Gia Binh, head of the Intensive Care Department, said Thuy was taken to the hospital in serious condition suffering primary viral pneumonia and multi-organ failure.


Vietnamese doctors consulted with Japanese counterparts to come up with a comprehensive treatment plan that included continuous renal replacement therapy to remove toxins in the patient’s blood, and reduce inflammation and organ damage.


The physicians’ efforts were rewarded after seven days as the woman began to improve and did not require the use of a breathing machine. After 10 days of intensive treatment, doctors said that Thuy’s organs had returned to normal functioning.


Bach Mai doctors also used other methods to help save the woman and are continuing to monitor her.


Dr. Binh said the method was first used in Japan but it is not widely implemented around the world as it is very expensive.


The Disease Control and Prevention Center (DCC) of the International Medical Center of Japan, which has a partnership with Bach Mai, sponsored the treatment process, which cost nearly VND200 million (US$10,500).


Dr. Nguyen Quoc Anh, Bach Mai Hospital’s director, said the new treatment techniques will hopefully pave the way for more successful outcomes in cases of severe or late-stage avian flu cases.


DCC Director Dr. Koichiro Kudo said the challenging case was beneficial for Vietnamese doctors as it improved their knowledge, determination and teamwork.

Source: SGGP

Yemen using war on Al-Qaeda to bolster regime: analysts

In World on January 11, 2010 at 5:51 am

DUBAI, Jan 11, 2010 (AFP) – Faced with an armed revolt in the north and a separatist movement in the south, Yemen’s president is using the Western-backed war against Al-Qaeda to bolster his regime and muzzle opponents, say analysts.








A picture shows a the Yemeni mountain village of Kawkaban, north of the capital Sanaa on January 10, 2010. (AFP photo)

The threat from Islamist militants poses less of a danger for Sanaa than the Zaidi Shiite insurrection on the border with Saudi Arabia or the independence calls in southern Yemen, according to Yemen experts.


“The regime is exploiting the war against Al-Qaeda to attract foreign aid and curb the opposition,” said anthropologist and Yemen specialist Franck Mermier.


With the West pressuring President Ali Abdullah Saleh to crack down on the Yemen branch of Al-Qaeda, “it is in the interests of the regime … to play the Al-Qaeda card to silence its opponents,” Mermier added.


The government was trying to “Al-Qaeda-ise” its enemies.


It suggests they are linked to Osama bin Laden’s network, especially Shiite rebels in the north who have been fighting the government since 2004 and the southerners, “most of whom are opposed to armed struggle,” Mermier said.


The south, which was an independent state from 1967 until Yemen was united in 1990, has been the scene of protests against the government’s repressive policies and its attempts “to amalgamate the southern movement and Al-Qaeda,” according to one of the movement’s leaders.


Separatists often complain of discrimination by northerners and a lack of financial aid.


But even if US military and financial support, in the name of the war on Al-Qaeda, “ends up strengthening Sanaa initially,” the government “could see a second more dangerous front opening up in the south,” Mercier warned.


“The regime’s policies are pushing its opponents towards more radical options, like separatism for the south.”


Mohammad al-Zahiri, professor of political science at Sanaa University, agrees that Yemen’s government is deliberately “exaggerating the Al-Qaeda threat in order to export or internationalise its problems.”


“The state is taking advantage of the West’s interest (in combating Al-Qaeda) … and avoiding its own internal problems,” he added.


But such an approach “cannot resolve Yemen’s problems and is very short-sighted,” said Zahiri, concerned that “military solutions will only lead to a rise in anti-Americanism in the country.”


He said only dialogue can achieve a permanent solution.


Zahiri was referring to the rebellion in the north, the demands of southerners and also the domestic opposition, angered by parliament’s agreement last February to delay legislative elections by two years.


“2009 has been the worst year for Yemen,” said Fares al-Saqqaf, director of the Centre for Future Studies in Sanaa.


“The country now faces five challenges: the rebellion in the north, which is intensifying, the southern question, which has turned into a separatist movement and is no longer peaceful, the Al-Qaeda threat, internal political opposition and the economic crisis.”


For Saqqaf, “the key to the solution is not military, but political and economic … Yemen cannot confront Al-Qaeda except by pacifying its other fronts, especially in the north and south.”


“The whole world wants to crush Al-Qaeda in Yemen. The country could take advantage of this conflict to demand economic aid, which would help to resolve its problems.”


He proposed the oil-rich Gulf states offer aid to the impoverished Arabian peninsula state “in the form of a Marshall plan,” referring to the post-World War II reconstruction plan for Europe.


The government has turned to the six Gulf Cooperation Council states for help but analysts say it has been almost negligible, although Riyadh has given Sanaa 7.2 billion dollars in aid over the past 10 years.


Source: SGGP Bookmark & Share