wiki globe

Posts Tagged ‘volcano’

Indonesia volcano death toll rises to 322

In Uncategorized on November 24, 2010 at 4:51 am

JAKARTA, Nov 23, 2010 (AFP) – Indonesia’s Mount Merapi volcano has killed 322 people since it began erupting late last month, and over 130,000 people are still living in makeshift camps, an official said Tuesday.


“The Merapi death toll has reached 322 people. More than 130,000 people are still living in temporary shelters,” disaster management official Agam Ferdatama said, updating the previous toll of 309 dead.


“Rescuers found many bodies in the incinerated area of Cangkringan,” he said.


The government reduced the exclusion zone on Friday for the second time in a week because of the volcano’s declining volatility, allowing more refugees to return to their homes.


Ferdatama said they had updated the number of refugees from more than 200,000 people.


Merapi killed around 1,300 people in 1930 but experts say November has seen its biggest convulsions since 1872.

d
Source: SGGP

Deadly Indonesian volcano eases off: government

In Uncategorized on November 14, 2010 at 9:54 am

Indonesia volcano death toll rises to 240

In Uncategorized on November 13, 2010 at 9:53 am

Panicked Indonesians flee deadly volcano

In Uncategorized on November 6, 2010 at 7:50 am

More evacuated as Indonesian volcano erupts again

In Uncategorized on November 5, 2010 at 10:55 am

Indonesian volcano claims another 35 lives

In Uncategorized on November 5, 2010 at 10:53 am

Indonesia issues flight warning as volcano spews ash

In Uncategorized on November 2, 2010 at 8:42 am

Indonesian volcano spews heat clouds, ash

In Uncategorized on November 1, 2010 at 4:41 am

137 dead as Indonesia hit by tsunami, volcano

In Uncategorized on October 27, 2010 at 5:34 am

JAKARTA (AFP) – At least 112 people were killed and hundreds remained missing in Indonesia after a tsunami triggered by a powerful earthquake smashed into a remote island chain, washing away entire villages.


Another 25 people have been killed after the eruption of the country’s most active volcano, as the force of nature was unleashed in an area known as the Pacific “Ring of Fire”.

Rescue officials evacuate a victim of the Merapi volcano at Kinahrejo village on October 26, 2010. AFP

The 7.7-magnitude quake struck late Monday in the Mentawai Islands off Sumatra generating waves as high as three metres (10 feet) that one official said had swept away 10 villages in one of the world’s top surfing spots.


“At least 112 people were killed and 502 people have gone missing,” West Sumatra disaster management head Harmensyah said Wednesday.


Less than 24 hours after the tsunami struck, Mount Merapi erupted on the island of Java, causing thousands to flee in panic as it spewed searing clouds of ash and claiming the lives of at least 25 people, including a baby.


“We heard three explosions around 6 pm (1100 GMT) spewing volcanic material as high as 1.5 kilometres (one mile) and sending heat clouds down the slopes,” government volcanologist Surono told AFP.


Indonesia sits on a “ring of fire”, where the meeting of continental plates causes high volcanic and seismic activity. The archipelago is frequently struck by powerful earthquakes and has the world’s largest number of active volcanoes.


A 7.6-magnitude earthquake in September last year in Padang killed about 1,100 people while the 2004 Asian tsunami — triggered by a 9.3-magnitude quake off Sumatra — killed at least 168,000 people in Indonesia alone.


Health Ministry Crisis Centre head Mudjiharto said the Mentawai waves reached up to three metres high and waters swept as far as 600 metres inland on South Pagai island, the hardest hit.


Disaster Management Agency spokesman Agolo Suparto said 10 villages had been swept away.


Medical personnel were on their way to the worst-hit areas in helicopters but rescue efforts had been hampered by disruption to communications in the remote islands, which are about half a day’s ferry ride away from Padang.


Disaster Management Agency aid coordinator Wisnu Wijaya told AFP that rescue teams from the capital Jakarta would join forces with local teams to evacuate bodies and deliver food aid, medicines, tents and blankets.


A group of Australian tourists reported that their boat with 15 people aboard was destroyed by a “wall of white water” crashing into a bay after the undersea quake and said some had to cling to trees to survive.


Rick Hallet, an Australian who operates a boat-chartering business in Sumatra, said a huge wave picked up another boat in the bay which smashed into his vessel, triggering an explosion and fireball.


“The bay we were in was several hundred metres across and the wall of white water was from one side to the other, it was quite scary,” he told Fairfax Radio Network.


Another group of nine Australian surfers was alive and well after going missing following the quake and tsunami, officials said Wednesday.


Australia’s foreign department said the nine on board the Southern Cross tour boat had lost mobile signal but contacted relatives late Tuesday, adding that they were not even aware of the tsunami pummelling the western islands.


US President Barack Obama, who lived in Indonesia as a boy and is due to return there on an Asian tour next month, pledged US help.


“(First Lady) Michelle and I are deeply saddened by the loss of life, injuries, and damage that have occurred as a result of the recent earthquake and tsunami in West Sumatra,” he said.


“As a friend of Indonesia, the United States stands ready to help in any way.”


Hundreds of kilometres away from the tsunami disaster zone, thousands of people fled in panic after the eruption of Mount Merapi, some covered in white ash, as officials with loudhailers tried to help them escape the area.


Search and rescue official Taufiq from Yogyakarta city told reporters that 12 bodies had been found in and around the house of the spiritual “gatekeeper” of the mountain.


“There are likely to be more victims as the terrain is difficult, roads are damaged and trees uprooted, it’s dark and the condition of the volcano is still unstable,” he said late Tuesday.


A local hospital doctor also said a baby had died from inhaling volcanic material.


The toll was updated to 25 on Wednesday morning.


Authorities had put an area 10 kilometres around the crater of Mount Merapi on red alert Monday, ordering 19,000 people to flee.


Volcanologist Surono said the latest activity at the 2,914-metre (9,616-foot) Merapi, was bigger than an eruption in 2006, which killed two people.


Its deadliest eruption occurred in 1930 when more than 1,300 people were killed. Heat clouds from another eruption in 1994 killed more than 60 people.

d
Source: SGGP

New volcano ash flight rules bring hope for airlines

In Uncategorized on May 18, 2010 at 9:03 am

LONDON (AFP) – British aviation regulators bring in measures Tuesday to reduce the airspace closures fiercely criticised by airlines, as European skies were hit by new shutdowns caused by volcano ash clouds.

A view showing heavy clouds over dwellings set near the Eyjafjoell volcano in Iceland. AFP photo

Plumes of thick ash from Iceland’s Eyjafjoell volcano, which in April shut down much of Europe’s airspace for a week last month, drifted over the continent Monday, closing major airports and cancelling some 1,000 flights.


Britain, the Netherlands and Ireland closed airspace, with London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest air hub, and Amsterdam-Schiphol among those affected.


Airlines, which have lost millions of dollars due to the ash alerts, have expressed their fury with what they viewed as unnecessary restrictions introduced by overcautious safety watchdogs.


In a bid to keep the skies open for business, British aviation regulators introduce new measures from midday Tuesday that will to allow flights in thicker ash than previously permitted for a certain amount of time.


The new area — called a “Time-Limited Zone” — was created after discussions between regulators and manufacturers, said regulator the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).


Experts believe high concentrations of volcanic dust can damage plane engines and even cause crashes.


But a CAA statement said: “Aircraft and engine manufacturers… have agreed that it is safe to allow operations in the new zone for a limited time.


“This means that areas of our airspace that would have previously been closed can safely open, further minimising disruption.”


To operate in the new zone, airlines must present regulators with a safety case which includes the agreement of the manufacturers, said the CAA.


This had already been achieved by British airline Flybe, which will be allowed in the zones from midday.


British Airways chief executive Willie Walsh led the attack on Monday’s flight restrictions, labelling them “a gross over-reaction to a very minor risk.”


His criticism was echoed by KLM after the disruption to Dutch airspace.


“The closure was unnecessary. The flight control service should have first measured the concentration of ash and then took a decision,” said KLM spokeswoman Joyce Veekman.


Irish airline Ryanair attacked the computer-generated projections used by safety authorities to work out the no-fly zones, saying they were insufficiently detailed.


Chief executive Michael O’Leary said: “It is frankly ridiculous that the flight plans of millions of air passengers across Europe are being disrupted on a daily basis by an outdated, inappropriate and imaginary computer-generated model and it is time that these charts were done away with.”


The international airline industry body, IATA, has estimated last month’s shutdown — Europe’s biggest since World War II — cost carriers some 1.7 billion dollars (1.4 billion euros).


Eurocontrol, the intergovernmental agency coordinating air traffic control, said around 1,000 flights in Europe were cancelled by Monday’s ash alert.


In the Netherlands, some 500 flights into and out of Amsterdam-Schiphol were axed after it was shut for seven hours until re-opening at 1100 GMT. Some 60,000 passengers were left stranded around the world by the closure.


London Heathrow and London Gatwick were also hit by a new round of delays and cancellations following a six-hour shutdown early Monday.


In Ireland, Dublin airport reopened at midday (1100 GMT) after a 17-hour shutdown as the cloud moved east. Almost 300 flights were cancelled, disrupting 36,000 passengers, The Irish Times newspaper said.


In Iceland, there was no sign of the volcano stopping.


The Eyjafjoell eruptions, which began on April 14, have peaked three times, with the latest surge of activity coming Friday.


“There is really no way of telling when it will stop… magma is still emerging,” Icelandic geophysicist Magnus Tumi Gudmundsson said.

d
Source: SGGP