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Posts Tagged ‘Zone’

Russians protest Kremlin time zone plan

In Uncategorized on December 18, 2010 at 10:27 am

Several dozen people on the Russian Pacific coast on Saturday rallied against a Kremlin plan to cut the number of time zones to further the sprawling country’s economic integration.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev delivers a speech as he presents the Federal Security Service flag in Moscow on December 17, 2010.

President Dmitry Medvedev surprised the country last year when during his state-of the-nation address he suggested cutting the number of time zones in order to improve coordination across Russia.


At the time of his announcement, the country spanned 11 time zones from Kaliningrad on the Baltic Sea to Chukotka on the Bering Sea and earlier this year the number of time zones fell to nine.


Under the Kremlin plan, the country’s Primorye region on the Pacific is to go from being seven hours ahead of Moscow to six next year after Medvedev’s initiative was rubber-stamped by a local legislature.


Most local residents are however unhappy about the move which would mean reduced hours of daylight in the evening and several dozen campaigners including from opposition parties gathered in central Vladivostok to protest against the plan.


Some of the slogans spotted at the rally read “We are not vampires. We do not want to live at night” and “The president’s message: outrun and outdo time.”


In nearby Sakhalin region, which is also seven hours ahead of Moscow, campaigners have already collected several thousand signatures against the Kremlin initiative.


Medvedev has said eliminating time zones could help the residents of some remote Russian regions but critics have derided his idea as silly and proof that he is a weak leader incapable of implementing substantive reforms.


Russia was divided into 11 time zones in 1919. The Soviet Union introduced daylight saving in 1981 and it has continued ever since.


The elimination of the time zone will be accomplished by having residents not set their clocks forward when Russia switches to daylight savings time in March.


Galina Medvedeva, a deputy representing the Communist party in the local legislature, said at the protest the plan did not take people’s opinion into account.


“If they cancel switching from summer to winter time then it will be getting dark in our region virtually in the middle of the day,” she added.


The remote region bordering China has tight economic ties with Asia and its residents often scoff at the Kremlin’s initiatives, their independent streak sometimes manifesting itself in mass rallies unseen in central Russia.


In 2008, authorities had to dispatch riot police all the way from Moscow to break up a protest against higher tariffs on used imported cars.

Source: SGGP

Gold Star Order for Military Zone 7

In Uncategorized on December 16, 2010 at 9:46 am

On its 65th anniversary, Military Zone 7 was presented with the Gold Star Order for the second time in its 65 year history.


Established in 1945, military zone 7 has constantly made great effort in fulfilling its political and military mission and continuously contributed to the country’s defence and military reconstruction.


Zone 7 was the core backbone of the main armed forces of the South and contributed greatly towards many triumphant victories during the resistant wars.


On the occasion of the 65th anniversary the zone’s 29 teams and 3 individuals were granted the title of Hero of the people’s armed forces.


Sai Gon Giai Phong showed visuals of the daily life and training methods of soldiers during peacetime.

 

Military Zone 7 soldiers during routine training

Drill at training ground

Soldiers are ready to struggle

 

Soldiers conduct the patrol on the sea

Overflow with joy or pleasure

Soldiers gather by water well



Source: SGGP

Scores found alive in Indonesia tsunami zone

In Uncategorized on October 30, 2010 at 10:10 am

SOUTH PAGAI, Indonesia, Oct 30, 2010 (AFP) – Scores of people feared dead in Indonesia’s tsunami disaster zone were found alive Saturday as rescue workers spread out to remote island communities five days after the killer wave.


The discovery came as Indonesia struggled with disaster on two fronts following another powerful eruption of the archipelago’s most active volcano, which spread chaos and ash over a vast area of central Java.

Three-week-old tsunami survivor Indonesian baby is attended by a nurse at a hospital in Sikakap in North Pagai island, one of the Mentawai islands on October 30, 2010. AFP

On the tsunami-hit Mentawai island chain off the coast of Sumatra, rescue workers battling rough seas and monsoon rain found 135 people hiding on high ground, too scared of another wave to return to their shattered villages.


“We’re so grateful that we’ve found many of the missing people — we’d been working very hard to find them,” disaster management official Joskamatir said.


Officials had held little hope of finding many of the missing after flights over the area earlier in the week revealed dozens of unclaimed bodies strewn across beaches and wedged in rubble.


Many of the dead were also believed to have been sucked out to sea as the killer wave receded.


The number of missing was almost halved from 298 to 163 following Saturday’s discovery, while the death count remained at 413, according to an official tally.


Rescue workers were reaching some of the isolated coastal villages crushed by the three-metre (10-foot) wall of water which was triggered on Monday by a 7.7-magnitude earthquake, but monsoon weather was slowing the relief effort.


“Before help came I survived by eating whatever we could find, such as taro,” said Theopilus, 42, a farmer on the worst-hit island of South Pagai.


“We’re in dire need of more food, tents and blankets. I feel really cold at night as it rains all the time.”


In central Java, 1,300 kilometres (810 miles) to the southeast, terrified residents fled in panic when Mount Merapi erupted again just after midnight, fearing a repeat of explosions on Tuesday that claimed at least 36 lives.


No one was killed in the latest eruption, but hospital staff reported that two people had died in the chaotic rush to escape.


“I was sleeping on the veranda when loud booms like thunder woke me up,” local resident Kris Budianto, 51, told AFP. He suffered a broken arm and facial wounds when he crashed his motorbike in the melee.


Volcanic ash rained down on the Central Java provincial capital of Yogyakarta 26 kilometres away from the crater, shutting the airport for over an hour.


Government volcanologist Subandrio said more eruptions were likely and warned about 50,000 people who have been evacuated from the danger zone not to tempt fate by going home too soon.


“We will even have to evaluate whether we need to widen the exclusion zone because we should not downplay the threat — Mount Merapi is extremely dangerous,” he said.


Many displaced people return to the slopes of 2,914-metre Merapi, a sacred landmark in Javanese tradition whose name means “Mountain of Fire”, to tend to their precious livestock during the day.


On North Pagai, dazed and hungry survivors of Monday night’s tsunami were still roaming between devastated villages looking for food and lost loved ones.


A baby was born in a crammed medical clinic as a man died of his wounds just a few beds away.


Another ship bearing badly need supplies such as tents, medicine and food arrived at Sikakap on the protected side of North Pagai island, while helicopters dropped aid packages to cut-off villages.


Joskamatir said only five percent of the aid piling up at Sikakap had been delivered to those in need, citing bad weather and the “limited availability of transportation” such as boats and helicopters.


“There are three helicopters here already but we still need more speedboats. We need about 50 speedboats,” he said.


Australia and the United States have pledged aid worth a total of three million dollars while the European Commission released 1.5 million euros (two million dollars) for victims of both disasters.


Indonesia straddles a region known as the “Pacific Ring of Fire”, with scores of active volcanoes and major tectonic fault lines. Almost 170,000 Indonesians were killed in the 2004 Asian tsunami.


President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono visited tsunami survivors on Thursday and said the “only long-term solution” was for people to move away from the most vulnerable coastal areas.


Mentawai fisherman Hari, 24, agreed.


“I plan to leave my village. I don’t want to live here anymore. I’m traumatised,” he said.

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Source: SGGP

US$ 4.5 billion to build economic zone in Tra Vinh

In Uncategorized on June 9, 2010 at 7:09 pm




US$ 4.5 billion to build economic zone in Tra Vinh


QĐND – Wednesday, June 09, 2010, 17:25 (GMT+7)


The Tra Vinh People’s Committee officially agreed on a project invested in by Le Hai Construction and Trade Ltd. to build Dinh Anh Economic Zone and a refinery in the province.

The project to build the economic zone, which was earlier approved by the Prime Minister, covers and area of 30,020 ha in the two districts of Tra Cu and Duyen Hai and costs some US$ 4.5 billion.


The economic zone is organised into two main sections: duty payable and duty free.


The first stage of the project will focus on the construction of a deep-water port and related sub-projects, Tra Cu tourist resort, residential areas, a power center, infrastructure in the duty free section and industrial section.


Under the approved plan, the economic zone will become one of key cultural and economic hubs in Mekong Delta and the two key subprojects are the deep-water port and the refinery.


Source: TPO


Translated by Thu Nguyen


Source: QDND

Obama to make fourth trip to oil disaster zone

In Uncategorized on June 9, 2010 at 2:18 pm

President Barack Obama unveiled plans for a fourth visit to the Gulf of Mexico next week, with his three-state tour reflecting the widening footprint of the US oil disaster zone.


Obama will visit Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, all of which have coastlines, fishing industries and tourist beaches damaged or threatened by the massive oil slick spawned by the April 20 explosion on a BP-operated rig.


On the 50th day of the disaster meanwhile, Obama lashed out at media “talking heads” who have criticized his response and said if it was up to him, he would fire BP CEO Tony Hayward over several flippant public comments.


“On Monday, June 14 and Tuesday, June 15, President Obama will travel to Mississippi, Alabama and Florida to further assess the latest efforts to counter the BP oil spill,” the White House said in a statement.


Obama has made three previous trips to the disaster area, all of them to Louisiana, until now the main focus of efforts to mop up the oil slick, and to plug the ruptured well that caused America’s worst environmental disaster.

A laughing gull coated in heavy oil wallows in the surf on June 4, on East Grand Terre Island, Louisiana.

Earlier, Obama struck a tougher rhetorical tone on the disaster, despite insisting he was not playing politics or putting on a show for news cameras.


Hayward, whose sardonic English tones and comments, including a prediction that the Gulf spill would be “very, very modest,” have irked some Americans, found himself directly in the cross-hairs.


“He wouldn’t be working for me after making any of those statements,” Obama said on the NBC “Today Show.”


Hayward has since apologized for his remarks.


Obama revealed he had not spoken to Hayward, since the explosion on the Deepwater Horizon, saying there would be little point.


“When you talk to a guy like a BP CEO, he’s going to say all the right things to me. I’m not interested in words. I’m interested in actions.”


Hayward can expect another tough ride next week: a key House of Representatives panel Tuesday said he would testify on the disaster on June 17.


Obama, who made the latest of his three trips to the disaster zone last week, insisted he had no time for playing politics — though his comments seem to be taking on an increasingly political cast.


He told NBC he was looking for some “ass to kick” as recriminations mount and oil reaps a dreadful toll on seabirds, Louisiana wetlands, teeming fishing grounds and idyllic beaches.


He rejected claims he had been too cool, or slow in his response.


“I’m going to push back hard on this because I think that this is an idea that got into folks’ heads and the media is running with it.


“I was down there a month ago, before most of these talking heads were even paying attention to the Gulf,” he said.


The undersea effort to capture spewing oil is accelerating.

Coastguard Admiral Thad Allen, who is heading the government response, said BP engineers had captured 14,842 barrels of oil over the last 24 hours from a containment cap placed over the well that blew on April 20, a significant increase from Monday’s tally.

It remains unclear how much oil is spewing out of the busted wellhead, and officials have warned they will not be able to siphon off all of the excess crude until relief wells are dug — likely not until August.

“We’ve gone from about 6,000 barrels up to almost 15,000,” Allen said.

Later, asked about estimates the leak could be gushing as much as 25,000-60,000 a day, Allen told ABC News: “I don’t know if it would be that high.

“Everything we know and everything we see is through the either remote sensors or remote-operated vehicles that are like looking through a particular keyhole at a particular time.”

Underwater video footage of the wellhead, and the containment cap installed by BP last week still appeared to show substantial oil escaping into the sea from the ruptured well.

There was also sobering news on the scope of the environmental damage, as scientists said that they had found evidence of an undersea oil plume at a size of 3,300 feet more than 40 miles from the disaster site.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said it had “fingerprinted” the oil to confirm it came from the BP well, though said the residue was currently at “low concentrations.”

BP had previously said oil plumes, which could pose deep threats to marine life, had not been discovered.

Still oil prices were up on Tuesday, fluttering around 72 dollars a barrel as expectations of slipping inventories and short term demand beat out fears of a faltering economy. New York’s main futures contract, light sweet crude for delivery in July, rose 55 cents to 71.99 dollars a barrel.

Commentators have drawn parallels between Obama’s handling of the slick, and his predecessor George W. Bush’s botched management of Hurricane Katrina that devastated the same coastline in 2005.

Political warning signs over the disaster are proliferating.

A recent CBS News poll showed only thirty-eight percent of Americans approve of the way the administration is dealing with the spill.

A Washington Post/ABC survey revealed more Americans disapprove of Obama’s response to the oil spill than disapprove of Bush’s Katrina performance.

Source: SGGP

Lang Son urged to build border gate economic zone

In Uncategorized on May 27, 2010 at 5:12 pm

Thai troops storm into Bangkok protest zone, 2 die

In Uncategorized on May 19, 2010 at 5:02 am

Thai soldiers with armored vehicles stormed into a fortified anti-government encampment Wednesday in central Bangkok, breaking through bamboo barricades and killing at least two protesters in a crackdown after weeks of clashes that have killed dozens.


Once inside the protest zone, troops fired M-16 rifles at fleeing protesters and shouted, “Come out and surrender or we’ll kill you.”


An Associated Press reporter who followed the troops into the protest camp saw the bodies of two men sprawled on the ground, one with a head wound and other apparently shot in the upper body. They were the first known casualties in the assault that began before dawn Wednesday on a 1-square kilometer (3-square kilometer) stretch of downtown Bangkok that protesters have occupied for weeks.

Thai soldiers fire torawds anti-government protesters near a barricade on Wednesday May 19, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand.

It was not clear how many protesters were still inside the encampment. As troops entered the fringes of the area, they passed smoldering fires and hastily abandoned campsites where clothes were still hanging on laundry lines. Shoes were scattered, chairs were overturned and a huge pile of rice was covered with flies.


Government spokesman Panitan Wattanayagorn went on national television four hours after the crackdown began to announce it was under way, speaking first in Thai and then in English.


“The operations will continue throughout the day,” Panitan said. “We would like to reassure the citizens of Bangkok that the operations are designed to make sure we stabilize the area.”


The army action came after weeks of defiance by the protesters who are seeking to oust the government of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva.


“This is D-Day,” said one soldier when asked earlier in the day if this was the final push to clear the protest zone.


Thick black smoke from mountains of burning tires darkened the skies Wednesday, billowing over the skyscrapers of this Asian metropolis of 10 million that has descended into chaos over the last week, with at least 39 killed, most of them civilians.


The violence in Bangkok, a popular stop for tourists heading to Thailand‘s world-famous beaches, has caused concern internationally and raised doubts about the stability of this Southeast Asian nation.


The so-called Red Shirt demonstrators marched into Bangkok in mid-March to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, dissolution of Parliament and immediate elections.


They created an encampment in Bangkok’s posh downtown Rajprasong district in April, surrounding themselves by a barricade of tires and bamboo spears, some of which appeared to be in flames Wednesday.


An estimated 3,000 people were believed to be inside the 1-square-mile (3-square-kilometer) protest zone, which has taken over several blocks of downtown Bangkok’s toniest shopping and tourism district.

Source: SGGP

Hai Phong’s non-tariff and industrial zone under construction

In Uncategorized on May 14, 2010 at 4:59 pm




Hai Phong’s non-tariff and industrial zone under construction


QĐND – Friday, May 14, 2010, 22:22 (GMT+7)

The northern port city of Hai Phong held a ground-breaking ceremony for its VND2.5 trillion Nam Dinh Vu non-tariff and industrial zone on May 13.


The project will cover a site of more than 1,300ha, divided into three areas including a non-tariff zone, a seaport and an industrial zone.


The non tariff-zone industrial zone will include supermarkets, duty free shops, bonded warehouses and areas for production, processing, recycling, a container depot and temporary import and re-export area.


It is expected to attract investors involved in green and environmentally friendly technology projects.


Its seaport will have 10 quays for container ships and a petrol and gas terminal capable of handling nearly 20 million tonnes a year.


Source: VOV


Source: QDND

Traditional revolutionary zone coming out of its shell

In Uncategorized on May 5, 2010 at 4:38 pm




Traditional revolutionary zone coming out of its shell


QĐND – Wednesday, May 05, 2010, 21:39 (GMT+7)


The northern mountainous Tuyen Quang province was a center of radical activism during Vietnam’s revolutionary struggle. Visiting the historical site now, it’s impossible not to notice the area’s strong development, with many construction projects worth hundreds of billion VND in value.

Tuyen Quang is located on the peaceful Lo River 165 kilometers northwest of Ha Noi.


The province is making all efforts to speed up its economic, cultural and social growth alongside neighboring provinces.

Tourism is one of Tuyen Quang’s strong points. Visitors are very interested in many tours to historical, cultural and ecotourism sites likely Tan Trao hamlet, Hong Thai communal house, Na Lua hut and more.

Tan Trao lies in a small valley between the mountains and jungle in Son Duong district and is roughly 200km from Hanoi.

The main places of interest are Tan Trao Communal House, Hong Thai Communal House, and a banyan tree and a hut where Ho Chi Minh lived from June to August 1945.

Tan Trao was used as a resistance base before August 1945 and was the provisional capital of the patriotic forces headed by late President Ho Chi Minh. The Communist Party of Vietnam held several important meetings there, especially in August 1945.

The wild beauty of the forest and mountains surrounding the Na Hang hydroelectric plant, including My Lam Atream, and sacred old pagodas and temples that dot the hills, attract thousands of visitors every year.

Tuyen Quang is also famous for its beautiful women with white complexions, good figures and shy smiles.

People believe that because the province was the capital of the Mac Dynasty (1527-1596), many imperial concubines produced beautiful lineages.

Tuyen Quang’s fresh air also makes for a high quality of life.

The province is also home of several ethnic groups such as Tay, Dao, Cao Lan, Mong, Thai and more.

Tuyen Quang town was recognized as a city in 2002. The city has a strong history of economic, cultural and social development but it still keeps the special cultural beauty of a traditional revolutionary zone.

Source: SGGP

Source: QDND

Traditional revolutionary zone coming out of its shell

In Uncategorized on May 5, 2010 at 8:34 am

The northern mountainous Tuyen Quang province was a center of radical activism during Vietnam’s revolutionary struggle. Visiting the historical site now, it’s impossible not to notice the area’s strong development, with many construction projects worth hundreds of billion VND in value.

Tuyen Quang town locates on the peaceful Lo River.

Tuyen Quang is located on the peaceful Lo River 165 kilometers northwest of Ha Noi.


The province is making all efforts to speed up its economic, cultural and social growth alongside neighboring provinces.

Tourism is one of Tuyen Quang’s strong points. Visitors are very interested in many tours to historical, cultural and ecotourism sites likely Tan Trao hamlet, Hong Thai communal house, Na Lua hut and more.

Tan Trao lies in a small valley between the mountains and jungle in Son Duong district and is roughly 200km from Hanoi.

The main places of interest are Tan Trao Communal House, Hong Thai Communal House, and a banyan tree and a hut where Ho Chi Minh lived from June to August 1945.

Tan Trao was used as a resistance base before August 1945 and was the provisional capital of the patriotic forces headed by late President Ho Chi Minh. The Communist Party of Vietnam held several important meetings there, especially in August 1945.

The wild beauty of the forest and mountains surrounding the Na Hang hydroelectric plant, including My Lam Atream, and sacred old pagodas and temples that dot the hills, attract thousands of visitors every year.

Tuyen Quang is also famous for its beautiful women with white complexions, good figures and shy smiles.

People believe that because the province was the capital of the Mac Dynasty (1527-1596), many imperial concubines produced beautiful lineages.

Tuyen Quang’s fresh air also makes for a high quality of life.

The province is also home of several ethnic groups such as Tay, Dao, Cao Lan, Mong, Thai and more.

Tuyen Quang town was recognized as a city in 2002. The city has a strong history of economic, cultural and social development but it still keeps the special cultural beauty of a traditional revolutionary zone.

Source: SGGP